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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




A wireless hybrid device for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been developed. The device combines a highly selective and sensitive tuning-fork based detector with a pre-concentrator and a separation column. The selectivity and sensitivity of the tuning-fork based detector is optimized for discrimination and quantification of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) via a homemade molecular imprinted polymer, and a specific detection and control circuit. The device is a wireless, portable, battery-powered, and cell-phone operated device. The device has been calibrated and validated in the laboratory and using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SFIT-MS). The capability and robustness …

Contributors
Chen, Cheng, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2011

Demand for biosensor research applications is growing steadily. According to a new report by Frost & Sullivan, the biosensor market is expected to reach $14.42 billion by 2016. Clinical diagnostic applications continue to be the largest market for biosensors, and this demand is likely to continue through 2016 and beyond. Biosensor technology for use in clinical diagnostics, however, requires translational research that moves bench science and theoretical knowledge toward marketable products. Despite the high volume of academic research to date, only a handful of biomedical devices have become viable commercial applications. Academic research must increase its focus on practical uses …

Contributors
Choi, Seokheun, Chae, Junseok, Tao, Nongjian, et al.
Created Date
2011

This work demonstrates the integration of a wearable particulate detector and a wireless chemical sensor into a single portable system. The detection philosophy of the chemical sensor is based on highly selective and sensitive microfabricated quartz tuning fork arrays and the particle detector detects the particulate level in real-time using a nephelometric (light scattering) approach. The device integration is realized by carefully evaluating the needs of flow rate, power and data collection. Validation test has been carried out in both laboratory and in field trials such as parking structures and highway exits with high and low traffic emissions. The integrated …

Contributors
Gao, Tianle, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2012

Measuring molecular interaction with membrane proteins is critical for understanding cellular functions, validating biomarkers and screening drugs. Despite the importance, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge, especially for small molecules binding to membrane proteins in their native cellular environment. The current mainstream practice is to isolate membrane proteins from the cell membranes, which is difficult and often lead to the loss of their native structures and functions. In this thesis, novel detection methods for in situ quantification of molecular interactions with membrane proteins are described. First, a label-free surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) platform is developed for …

Contributors
Zhang, Fenni, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018

Proteins play a central role to human body and biological activities. As powerful tools for protein detections, many surface plasmon resonance based techniques have been developed to enhance the sensitivity. However, sensitivity is not the only final goal. As a biosensor, four things really matter: sensitivity, specificity, resolution (temporal/spatial) and throughput. This dissertation presents several works on developing novel plasmonic based techniques for protein detections on the last two aspects to extend the application field. A fast electrochemically controlled plasmonic detection technique is first developed with the capability of monitoring electrochemical signal with nanosecond response time. The study reveals that …

Contributors
Wang, Yan, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018

Obtaining local electrochemical (EC) information is extremely important for understanding basic surface reactions, and for many applications. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can obtain local EC information by scanning a microelectrode across the surface. Although powerful, SECM is slow, the scanning microelectrode may perturb reaction and the measured signal decreases with the size of microelectrode. This thesis demonstrates a new imaging technique based on a principle that is completely different from the conventional EC detection technologies. The technique, referred to as plasmonic-based electrochemical imaging (PECI), images local EC current (both faradaic and non-faradaic) without using a scanning microelectrode. Because PECI response …

Contributors
Shan, Xiaonan, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2011

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has emerged as a popular technique for elucidating subtle signals from biological events in a label-free, high throughput environment. The efficacy of conventional SPR sensors, whose signals are mass-sensitive, diminishes rapidly with the size of the observed target molecules. The following work advances the current SPR sensor paradigm for the purpose of small molecule detection. The detection limits of two orthogonal components of SPR measurement are targeted: speed and sensitivity. In the context of this report, speed refers to the dynamic range of measured kinetic rate constants, while sensitivity refers to the target molecule mass limitation …

Contributors
Macgriff, Christopher Assiff, Tao, Nongjian, Wang, Shaopeng, et al.
Created Date
2013