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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Language
  • English
Status
  • Public
Date Range
2011 2018


Changes to a cell's DNA can result in cancer, which is permanently sustained cellular proliferation. When malfunctioning genes, oncogenes, were verified to be of human origin in the 1970s, drugs were designed to target their encoded, abnormal enzymes. Tyrosine kinases have been established as an oft-modified oncogene enzyme family, but the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) were not investigated as thoroughly. PTPs have gradually been established as relevant enzymes that work in tandem with tyrosine kinases in cell signaling and are not just "house-keeping" enzymes. Some PTPs are thought to initiate tumorigenesis, and others may play a complementary role after the …

Contributors
Fadgen, Casey, Rose, Seth D, Francisco, Wilson, et al.
Created Date
2012

The energy required in a eukaryotic cell is provided by mitochondria. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) coupled with oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP. During electron transport, electron leakage from the ETC produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). In healthy cells, there are preventive and defense mechanisms in place to manage ROS. Maintaining a steady balance of ROS is very important because overproduction of ROS can lead to several pathological conditions. There are several strategies to prevent ROS production. Addition of external antioxidants is widely used among them. Discussed in the first part of Chapter 1 is the mitochondrial ETC, ROS production and …

Contributors
Roy Chowdhury, Sandipan, Hecht, Sidney, Gould, Ian, et al.
Created Date
2016

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a series of molecules, ions, and radicals derived from oxygen that possess remarkable reactivity. They act as signaling molecules when their concentration in cells is within a normal range. When the levels of ROS increase, reaching a concentration in which the antioxidants cannot readily quench them, oxidative stress will affect the cells. These excessive levels of ROS result in direct or indirect ROS-mediated damage of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. Excessive oxidative stress, particularly in chronic inflammation, has been linked with mutations and carcinogenesis. One of the main targets of ROS in severe oxidative stress …

Contributors
Armendariz Guajardo, Jose Israel, Hecht, Sidney M, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2014

Biomolecules can easily recognize its corresponding partner and get bound to it, resulting in controlling various processes (immune system, inter or intracellular signaling) in biology and physiology. Bonding between two partners can be a result of electrostatic, hydrophobic interactions or shape complementarity. It is of great importance to study these kinds of biomolecular interactions to have a detailed knowledge of above mentioned physiological processes. These studies can also open avenues for other aspects of science such as drug development. Discussed in the first part of Chapter 1 are the biotin-streptavidin biomolecular interaction studies by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface …

Contributors
Biswas, Sudipta, Lindsay, Stuart, Zhang, Peiming, et al.
Created Date
2016

DNA nanotechnology is one of the most flourishing interdisciplinary research fields. Through the features of programmability and predictability, DNA nanostructures can be designed to self-assemble into a variety of periodic or aperiodic patterns of different shapes and length scales, and more importantly, they can be used as scaffolds for organizing other nanoparticles, proteins and chemical groups. By leveraging these molecules, DNA nanostructures can be used to direct the organization of complex bio-inspired materials that may serve as smart drug delivery systems and in vitro or in vivo bio-molecular computing and diagnostic devices. In this dissertation I describe a systematic study …

Contributors
Wei, Xixi, Liu, Yan, Yan, Hao, et al.
Created Date
2014

Since the discovery of graphene, two dimensional materials (2D materials) have become a focus of interest for material research due to their many unique physical properties embedded in their 2D structure. While they host many exciting potential applications, some of these 2D materials are subject to environmental instability issues induced by interaction between material and gas molecules in air, which poses a barrier to further application and manufacture. To overcome this, it is necessary to understand the origin of material instability and interaction with molecules commonly found in air, as well as developing a reproducible and manufacturing compatible method to …

Contributors
Yang, Sijie, Tongay, Sefaattin, Gould, Ian, et al.
Created Date
2017