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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Language
  • English
Status
  • Public
Date Range
2010 2019


In thesis, a test time reduction (a low cost test) methodology for digitally-calibrated pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is presented. A long calibration time is required in the final test to validate performance of these designs. To reduce total test time, optimized calibration technique and calibrated effective number of bits (ENOB) prediction from calibration coefficient will be presented. With the prediction technique, failed devices can be identified only without actual calibration. This technique reduces significant amount of time for the total test time. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Kim, Kibeom, Ozev, Sule, Kitchen, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2013

New technologies enable the exploration of space, high-fidelity defense systems, lighting fast intercontinental communication systems as well as medical technologies that extend and improve patient lives. The basis for these technologies is high reliability electronics devised to meet stringent design goals and to operate consistently for many years deployed in the field. An on-going concern for engineers is the consequences of ionizing radiation exposure, specifically total dose effects. For many of the different applications, there is a likelihood of exposure to radiation, which can result in device degradation and potentially failure. While the total dose effects and the resulting degradation …

Contributors
Schlenvogt, Garrett James, Barnaby, Hugh, Goodnick, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2014

There is an ever growing need for larger memories which are reliable and fast. New technologies to implement non-volatile memories which are large, fast, compact and cost-efficient are being studied extensively. One of the most promising technologies being developed is the resistive RAM (ReRAM). In ReRAM the resistance of the device varies with the voltage applied across it. Programmable metallization cells (PMC) is one of the devices belonging to this category of non-volatile memories. In order to advance the development of these devices, there is a need to develop simulation models which replicate the behavior of these devices in circuits. …

Contributors
Bharadwaj, Vineeth, Barnaby, Hugh, Kozicki, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2014

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A promising candidate for next-generation memory is ion-conducting bridging RAM which is referred to as programmable metallization cell (PMC), conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM), or electrochemical metallization memory (ECM), which is likely to surpass flash memory in all the ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to completely understand PMC operation and assist in design optimization. To advance the PMC …

Contributors
Rajabi, Saba, Barnaby, Hugh, Kozicki, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2014

Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI) is commonly seen in p-channel transistors under negative gate voltages at an elevated temperature. The interface traps, oxide traps and NBTI mechanisms are discussed and their effect on circuit degradation and results are discussed. This thesis focuses on developing a model for simulating impact of NBTI effects at circuit level. The model mimics the effects of degradation caused by the defects. The NBTI model developed in this work is validated and sanity checked by using the simulation data from silvaco and gives excellent results. Furthermore the susceptibility of CMOS circuits such as the CMOS inverter, …

Contributors
Padala, Sudheer, Barnaby, Hugh, Bakkaloglu, Bertan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Non-volatile memory (NVM) has become a staple in the everyday life of consumers. NVM manifests inside cell phones, laptops, and most recently, wearable tech such as smart watches. NAND Flash has been an excellent solution to conditions requiring fast, compact NVM. Current technology nodes are nearing the physical limits of scaling, preventing flash from improving. To combat the limitations of flash and to appease consumer demand for progressively faster and denser NVM, new technologies are needed. One possible candidate for the replacement of NAND Flash is programmable metallization cells (PMC). PMC are a type of resistive memory, meaning that they …

Contributors
Taggart, Jennifer Lynn, Barnaby, Hugh, Kozicki, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2015

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology employs the mechanisms of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes (SE) and electrochemical redox reactions in order to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias is applied to an anode opposite to a cathode, atoms at the anode are oxidized to ions and dissolve into the SE. Under the influence of the electric field, the ions move to the cathode and become reduced to form the electrodeposits. These electrodeposits are filamentary in nature and persistent, and since they are metallic can alter the physical characteristics of the material on which they are formed. PMCs can …

Contributors
Yu, Weijie, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh, et al.
Created Date
2015

Over decades, scientists have been scaling devices to increasingly smaller feature sizes for ever better performance of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology to meet requirements on speed, complexity, circuit density, power consumption and ultimately cost required by many advanced applications. However, going to these ultra-scaled CMOS devices also brings some drawbacks. Aging due to bias-temperature-instability (BTI) and Hot carrier injection (HCI) is the dominant cause of functional failure in large scale logic circuits. The aging phenomena, on top of process variations, translate into complexity and reduced design margin for circuits. Such issues call for “Design for Reliability”. In order to …

Contributors
BANSAL, ANKITA, Cao, Yu, Seo, Jae Sun, et al.
Created Date
2016

The formation of dendrites in materials is usually seen as a failure-inducing defect in devices. Naturally, most research views dendrites as a problem needing a solution while focusing on process control techniques and post-mortem analysis of various stress patterns with the ultimate goal of total suppression of the structures. However, programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology embraces dendrite formation in chalcogenide glasses by utilizing the nascent conductive filaments as its core operative element. Furthermore, exciting More-than-Moore capabilities in the realms of device watermarking and hardware encryption schema are made possible by the random nature of dendritic branch growth. While dendritic structures …

Contributors
Foss, Ryan Martin, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh, et al.
Created Date
2016

The market for high speed camera chips, or image sensors, has experienced rapid growth over the past decades owing to its broad application space in security, biomedical equipment, and mobile devices. CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology has significantly improved the performance of the high speed camera chip by enabling the monolithic integration of pixel circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion. However, for low light intensity applications, many CMOS image sensors have a sub-optimum dynamic range, particularly in high speed operation. Thus the requirements for a sensor to have a high frame rate and high fill factor is attracting more attention. Another drawback …

Contributors
Zhao, Tong, Barnaby, Hugh, Mikkola, Esko, et al.
Created Date
2017