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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Mime Type
  • application/pdf
Date Range
2011 2018


This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal processing methods for analysis of signals arising from measurement of social, biological, and other non-traditional phenomena has been an important and growing area of signal processing research over the past decade. Here, we explore the application of statistical modeling and signal processing concepts to data obtained from the Global Group Relations Project, specifically to understand and quantify the effects and interactions of social psychological factors related to intergroup conflicts. We …

Contributors
Liu, Hui, Taylor, Thomas, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2012

Spectral congestion is quickly becoming a problem for the telecommunications sector. In order to alleviate spectral congestion and achieve electromagnetic radio frequency (RF) convergence, communications and radar systems are increasingly encouraged to share bandwidth. In direct opposition to the traditional spectrum sharing approach between radar and communications systems of complete isolation (temporal, spectral or spatial), both systems can be jointly co-designed from the ground up to maximize their joint performance for mutual benefit. In order to properly characterize and understand cooperative spectrum sharing between radar and communications systems, the fundamental limits on performance of a cooperative radar-communications system are investigated. …

Contributors
Chiriyath, Alex Rajan, Bliss, Daniel W, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2018

The explosive growth of data generated from different services has opened a new vein of research commonly called ``big data.'' The sheer volume of the information in this data has yielded new applications in a wide range of fields, but the difficulties inherent in processing the enormous amount of data, as well as the rate at which it is generated, also give rise to significant challenges. In particular, processing, modeling, and understanding the structure of online social networks is computationally difficult due to these challenges. The goal of this study is twofold: first to present a new networked data processing …

Contributors
Proulx, Brian Benjamin, Zhang, Junshan, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015

Electric field imaging allows for a low cost, compact, non-invasive, non-ionizing alternative to other methods of imaging. It has many promising industrial applications including security, safely imaging power lines at construction sites, finding sources of electromagnetic interference, geo-prospecting, and medical imaging. The work presented in this dissertation concerns low frequency electric field imaging: the physics, hardware, and various methods of achieving it. Electric fields have historically been notoriously difficult to work with due to how intrinsically noisy the data is in electric field sensors. As a first contribution, an in-depth study demonstrates just how prevalent electric field noise is. In …

Contributors
Chung, Hugh Emanuel, Allee, David R, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2017

This dissertation describes a novel, low cost strategy of using particle streak (track) images for accurate micro-channel velocity field mapping. It is shown that 2-dimensional, 2-component fields can be efficiently obtained using the spatial variation of particle track lengths in micro-channels. The velocity field is a critical performance feature of many microfluidic devices. Since it is often the case that un-modeled micro-scale physics frustrates principled design methodologies, particle based velocity field estimation is an essential design and validation tool. Current technologies that achieve this goal use particle constellation correlation strategies and rely heavily on costly, high-speed imaging hardware. The proposed …

Contributors
Mahanti, Prasun, Cochran, Douglas, Taylor, Thomas, et al.
Created Date
2011

The cyber-physical systems (CPS) are emerging as the underpinning technology for major industries in the 21-th century. This dissertation is focused on two fundamental issues in cyber-physical systems: network interdependence and information dynamics. It consists of the following two main thrusts. The first thrust is targeted at understanding the impact of network interdependence. It is shown that a cyber-physical system built upon multiple interdependent networks are more vulnerable to attacks since node failures in one network may result in failures in the other network, causing a cascade of failures that would potentially lead to the collapse of the entire infrastructure. …

Contributors
Qian, Dajun, Zhang, Junshan, Ying, Lei, et al.
Created Date
2012

There is an ever-growing need for broadband conformal antennas to not only reduce the number of antennas utilized to cover a broad range of frequencies (VHF-UHF) but also to reduce visual and RF signatures associated with communication systems. In many applications antennas needs to be very close to low-impedance mediums or embedded inside low-impedance mediums. However, for conventional metal and dielectric antennas to operate efficiently in such environments either a very narrow bandwidth must be tolerated, or enough loss added to expand the bandwidth, or they must be placed one quarter of a wavelength above the conducting surface. The latter …

Contributors
Yousefi, Tara, Diaz, Rodolfo E, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2017

This thesis describes an approach to system identification based on compressive sensing and demonstrates its efficacy on a challenging classical benchmark single-input, multiple output (SIMO) mechanical system consisting of an inverted pendulum on a cart. Due to its inherent non-linearity and unstable behavior, very few techniques currently exist that are capable of identifying this system. The challenge in identification also lies in the coupled behavior of the system and in the difficulty of obtaining the full-range dynamics. The differential equations describing the system dynamics are determined from measurements of the system's input-output behavior. These equations are assumed to consist of …

Contributors
Naik, Manjish Arvind, Cochran, Douglas, Kovvali, Narayan, et al.
Created Date
2011

Resource allocation in communication networks aims to assign various resources such as power, bandwidth and load in a fair and economic fashion so that the networks can be better utilized and shared by the communicating entities. The design of efficient resource-allocation algorithms is, however, becoming more and more challenging due to the precipitously increasing scale of the networks. This thesis strives to understand how to design such low-complexity algorithms with performance guarantees. In the first part, the link scheduling problem in wireless ad hoc networks is considered. The scheduler is charge of finding a set of wireless data links to …

Contributors
Kang, Xiaohan, Ying, Lei, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015

Modern systems that measure dynamical phenomena often have limitations as to how many sensors can operate at any given time step. This thesis considers a sensor scheduling problem in which the source of a diffusive phenomenon is to be localized using single point measurements of its concentration. With a linear diffusion model, and in the absence of noise, classical observability theory describes whether or not the system's initial state can be deduced from a given set of linear measurements. However, it does not describe to what degree the system is observable. Different metrics of observability have been proposed in literature …

Contributors
Najam, Anbar, Cochran, Douglas, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2016