Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Mime Type
Date Range
2011 2018


Studying the electronic band structure is necessary to understand the physics behind electron transport in devices made of the material under consideration. Graphene has been in the limelight of ground breaking research in the recent past and will continue to be in the future, as scientists around the world have been giving special attention to this remarkable material in pursuit of advancement in the semiconductor device industry by making use of many of its fascinating properties. Although several different approaches have been proposed for the calculation of the band structure, the empirical methods have proven to be more convenient, since …

Contributors
Ramanujam, Srinivasa Varadan, Ferry, David K, Saraniti, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2015

A novel Monte Carlo rejection technique for solving the phonon and electron Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE), including full many-particle interactions, is presented in this work. This technique has been developed to explicitly model population-dependent scattering within the full-band Cellular Monte Carlo (CMC) framework to simulate electro-thermal transport in semiconductors, while ensuring the conservation of energy and momentum for each scattering event. The scattering algorithm directly solves the many-body problem accounting for the instantaneous distribution of the phonons. The general approach presented is capable of simulating any non-equilibrium phase-space distribution of phonons using the full phonon dispersion without the need of …

Contributors
Sabatti, Flavio Francesco Maria, Saraniti, Marco, Smith, David J, et al.
Created Date
2018

In mesoscopic physics, conductance fluctuations are a quantum interference phenomenon that comes from the phase interference of electron wave functions scattered by the impurity disorder. During the past few decades, conductance fluctuations have been studied in various materials including metals, semiconductors and graphene. Since the patterns of conductance fluctuations is related to the distributions and configurations of the impurity scatterers, each sample has its unique pattern of fluctuations, which is considered as a sample fingerprint. Thus, research on conductance fluctuations attracts attention worldwide for its importance in both fundamental physics and potential technical applications. Since early experimental measurements of conductance …

Contributors
Liu, Bobo, Ferry, David K, Akis, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2015

In this work, transport in nanowire materials and nanowire field effect transistors is studied using a full band Monte Carlo simulator within the tight binding basis. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the importance of nanowires and nanoscale devices in present day electronics and the necessity to use a computationally efficient tool to simulate transport in these devices. Chapter 2 discusses the calculation of the full band structure of nanowires based on an atomistic tight binding approach, particularly noting the use of the exact same tight binding parameters for bulk band structures as well as the nanowire band structures. Chapter 3 …

Contributors
Hathwar, Raghuraj, Goodnick, Stephen M, Goodnick, Stephen M, et al.
Created Date
2016

The drive towards device scaling and large output power in millimeter and sub-millimeter wave power amplifiers results in a highly non-linear, out-of-equilibrium charge transport regime. Particle-based Full Band Monte Carlo device simulators allow an accurate description of this carrier dynamics at the nanoscale. This work initially compares GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on the established Ga-face technology and the emerging N-face technology, through a modeling approach that allows a fair comparison, indicating that the N-face devices exhibit improved performance with respect to Ga-face ones due to the natural back-barrier confinement that mitigates short-channel-effects. An investigation is then carried …

Contributors
Guerra, Diego, Saraniti, Marco, Saraniti, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2011

With the high demand for faster and smaller wireless communication devices, manufacturers have been pushed to explore new materials for smaller and faster transistors. One promising class of transistors is high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs have been shown to perform well at high power and high frequencies. However, AlGaN/GaN HEMTs have been gaining more attention recently due to their comparatively higher power densities and better high frequency performance. Nevertheless, these devices have experienced truncated lifetimes. It is assumed that reducing defect densities in these materials will enable a more direct study of the failure mechanisms in these devices. …

Contributors
McConkie, Thomas, Smith, David J, McCartney, Martha, et al.
Created Date
2018

In this work, the insight provided by our sophisticated Full Band Monte Carlo simulator is used to analyze the behavior of state-of-art devices like GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors and Hot Electron Transistors. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the description of the simulation tool used to obtain the results shown in this work. Moreover, a separate section is dedicated the set up of a procedure to validate to the tunneling algorithm recently implemented in the simulator. Chapter 2 introduces High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), state-of-art devices characterized by highly non linear transport phenomena that require the use of advanced simulation …

Contributors
Soligo, Riccardo, Saraniti, Marco, Goodnick, Stephen M, et al.
Created Date
2016

ABSTRACT An Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) computer code has been developed to simulate, semi-classically, spin-dependent electron transport in quasi two-dimensional (2D) III-V semiconductors. The code accounts for both three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-2D transport, utilizing either 3D or 2D scattering mechanisms, as appropriate. Phonon, alloy, interface roughness, and impurity scattering mechanisms are included, accounting for the Pauli Exclusion Principle via a rejection algorithm. The 2D carrier states are calculated via a self-consistent 1D Schrödinger-3D-Poisson solution in which the charge distribution of the 2D carriers in the quantization direction is taken as the spatial distribution of the squared envelope functions within the …

Contributors
Tierney, Brian David, Goodnick, Stephen, Ferry, David, et al.
Created Date
2011

In this work, an advanced simulation study of reliability in millimeter-wave (mm-wave) GaN Devices for power amplifier (PA) applications is performed by means of a particle-based full band Cellular Monte Carlo device simulator (CMC). The goal of the study is to obtain a systematic characterization of the performance of GaN devices operating in DC, small signal AC and large-signal radio-frequency (RF) conditions emphasizing on the microscopic properties that correlate to degradation of device performance such as generation of hot carriers, presence of material defects and self-heating effects. First, a review of concepts concerning GaN technology, devices, reliability mechanisms and PA …

Contributors
Latorre Rey, Alvaro Daniel, Saraniti, Marco, Kitchen, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2018

This research investigated using impedance as a minimally invasive oral cancer-screening tool by modeling healthy and diseased tissue. This research developed an ultra-structurally based tissue model for oral mucosa that is versatile enough to be easily modified to mimic the passive electrical impedance responses of multiple benign and cancerous tissue types. This new model provides answers to biologically meaningful questions related to the impedance response of healthy and diseased tissues. This model breaks away from the old empirical top down "black box" Thèvinin equivalent model. The new tissue model developed here was created from a bottom up perspective resulting in …

Contributors
Pelletier, Peter Robert, Kozicki, Michael, Towe, Bruce, et al.
Created Date
2012