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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Mime Type
  • application/pdf
Date Range
2011 2018


Advances in miniaturized sensors and wireless technologies have enabled mobile health systems for efficient healthcare. A mobile health system assists the physician to monitor the patient's progress remotely and provide quick feedbacks and suggestions in case of emergencies, which reduces the cost of healthcare without the expense of hospitalization. This work involves development of an innovative mobile health system with adaptive biofeedback mechanism and demonstrates the importance of biofeedback in accurate measurements of physiological parameters to facilitate the diagnosis in mobile health systems. Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) assessment, a key aspect in the treatment of diet related health problems is …

Contributors
Krishnan, Ranganath, Tao, Nongjian, Forzani, Erica, et al.
Created Date
2012

Understanding charge transport in single molecules covalently bonded to electrodes is a fundamental goal in the field of molecular electronics. In the past decade, it has become possible to measure charge transport on the single-molecule level using the STM break junction method. Measurements on the single-molecule level shed light on charge transport phenomena which would otherwise be obfuscated by ensemble measurements of groups of molecules. This thesis will discuss three projects carried out using STM break junction. In the first project, the transition between two different charge transport mechanisms is reported in a set of molecular wires. The shortest wires …

Contributors
Hines, Thomas, Tao, Nongjian, Li, Jian, et al.
Created Date
2013

In today's world there is a great need for sensing methods as tools to provide critical information to solve today's problems in security applications. Real time detection of trace chemicals, such as explosives, in a complex environment containing various interferents using a portable device that can be reliably deployed in a field has been a difficult challenge. A hybrid nanosensor based on the electrochemical reduction of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and the interaction of the reduction products with conducting polymer nanojunctions in an ionic liquid was fabricated. The sensor simultaneously measures the electrochemical current from the reduction of TNT and the conductance …

Contributors
Diaz Aguilar, Alvaro, Tao, Nongjian, Tsui, Raymond, et al.
Created Date
2012

Dual-wavelength laser sources have various existing and potential applications in wavelength division multiplexing, differential techniques in spectroscopy for chemical sensing, multiple-wavelength interferometry, terahertz-wave generation, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In the drive for ever smaller and increasingly mobile electronic devices, dual-wavelength coherent light output from a single semiconductor laser diode would enable further advances and deployment of these technologies. The output of conventional laser diodes is however limited to a single wavelength band with a few subsequent lasing modes depending on the device design. This thesis investigates a novel semiconductor laser device design with a single cavity waveguide capable …

Contributors
Green, Benjamin C., Zhang, Yong-Hang, Ning, Cun-Zheng, et al.
Created Date
2011

This work demonstrates the integration of a wearable particulate detector and a wireless chemical sensor into a single portable system. The detection philosophy of the chemical sensor is based on highly selective and sensitive microfabricated quartz tuning fork arrays and the particle detector detects the particulate level in real-time using a nephelometric (light scattering) approach. The device integration is realized by carefully evaluating the needs of flow rate, power and data collection. Validation test has been carried out in both laboratory and in field trials such as parking structures and highway exits with high and low traffic emissions. The integrated …

Contributors
Gao, Tianle, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2012

Measuring molecular interaction with membrane proteins is critical for understanding cellular functions, validating biomarkers and screening drugs. Despite the importance, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge, especially for small molecules binding to membrane proteins in their native cellular environment. The current mainstream practice is to isolate membrane proteins from the cell membranes, which is difficult and often lead to the loss of their native structures and functions. In this thesis, novel detection methods for in situ quantification of molecular interactions with membrane proteins are described. First, a label-free surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) platform is developed for …

Contributors
Zhang, Fenni, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018

Detection of molecular interactions is critical for understanding many biological processes, for detecting disease biomarkers, and for screening drug candidates. Fluorescence-based approach can be problematic, especially when applied to the detection of small molecules. Various label-free techniques, such as surface plasmon resonance technique are sensitive to mass, making it extremely challenging to detect small molecules. In this thesis, novel detection methods for molecular interactions are described. First, a simple detection paradigm based on reflectance interferometry is developed. This method is simple, low cost and can be easily applied for protein array detection. Second, a label-free charge sensitive optical detection (CSOD) …

Contributors
Guan, Yan, Tao, Nongjian, LaBaer, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2015

Monitoring vital physiological signals, such as heart rate, blood pressure and breathing pattern, are basic requirements in the diagnosis and management of various diseases. Traditionally, these signals are measured only in hospital and clinical settings. An important recent trend is the development of portable devices for tracking these physiological signals non-invasively by using optical methods. These portable devices, when combined with cell phones, tablets or other mobile devices, provide a new opportunity for everyone to monitor one’s vital signs out of clinic. This thesis work develops camera-based systems and algorithms to monitor several physiological waveforms and parameters, without having to …

Contributors
Shao, Dangdang, Tao, Nongjian, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2016

Studying charge transport through single molecules tethered between two metal electrodes is of fundamental importance in molecular electronics. Over the years, a variety of methods have been developed in attempts of performing such measurements. However, the limitation of these techniques is still one of the factors that prohibit one from gaining a thorough understanding of single molecule junctions. Firstly, the time resolution of experiments is typically limited to milli to microseconds, while molecular dynamics simulations are carried out on the time scale of pico to nanoseconds. A huge gap therefore persists between the theory and the experiments. This thesis demonstrates …

Contributors
Guo, Shaoyin, Tao, Nongjian, Bennett, Peter, et al.
Created Date
2012

Proteins play a central role to human body and biological activities. As powerful tools for protein detections, many surface plasmon resonance based techniques have been developed to enhance the sensitivity. However, sensitivity is not the only final goal. As a biosensor, four things really matter: sensitivity, specificity, resolution (temporal/spatial) and throughput. This dissertation presents several works on developing novel plasmonic based techniques for protein detections on the last two aspects to extend the application field. A fast electrochemically controlled plasmonic detection technique is first developed with the capability of monitoring electrochemical signal with nanosecond response time. The study reveals that …

Contributors
Wang, Yan, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018