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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


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Date Range
2011 2019


Graphene has been extensively researched for both scientific and technological interests since its first isolation from graphite. The excellent transport properties and long spin diffusion length of graphene make it a promising material for electronic and spintronic device applications. This dissertation deals with the optimization of magnetic field sensing in graphene and the realization of nanoparticle induced ferromagnetism in graphene towards spintronic device applications. Graphene has been used as a channel material for magnetic sensors demonstrating the potential for very high sensitivities, especially for Hall sensors, due to its extremely high mobility and low carrier concentration. However, the two-carrier nature …

Contributors
Song, Guibin, Kiehl, Richard A, Kiehl, Richard A, et al.
Created Date
2019

There is an ever-increasing demand for higher bandwidth and data rate ensuing from exploding number of radio frequency integrated systems and devices. As stated in the Shannon-Hartley theorem, the maximum achievable data rate of a communication channel is linearly proportional to the system bandwidth. This is the main driving force behind pushing wireless systems towards millimeter-wave frequency range, where larger bandwidth is available at a higher carrier frequency. Observing the Moor’s law, highly scaled complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) technologies provide fast transistors with a high unity power gain frequency which enables operating at millimeter-wave frequency range. CMOS is the compelling choice …

Contributors
HabibiMehr, Payam, Thornton, Trevor John, Bakkaloglu, Bertan, et al.
Created Date
2019

Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors GaN (3.4 eV), Ga2O3 (4.8 eV) and AlN (6.2 eV), have gained considerable interests for energy-efficient optoelectronic and electronic applications in solid-state lighting, photovoltaics, power conversion, and so on. They can offer unique device performance compared with traditional semiconductors such as Si. Efficient GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have increasingly displaced incandescent and fluorescent bulbs as the new major light sources for lighting and display. In addition, due to their large bandgap and high critical electrical field, WBG semiconductors are also ideal candidates for efficient power conversion. In this dissertation, two types of devices are demonstrated: …

Contributors
Fu, Houqiang, Zhao, Yuji, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2019

This dissertation proposes and presents two different passive sigma-delta modulator zoom Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) architectures. The first ADC is fullydifferential, synthesizable zoom-ADC architecture with a passive loop filter for lowfrequency Built in Self-Test (BIST) applications. The detailed ADC architecture and a step by step process designing the zoom-ADC along with a synthesis tool that can target various design specifications are presented. The design flow does not rely on extensive knowledge of an experienced ADC designer. Two example set of BIST ADCs have been synthesized with different performance requirements in 65nm CMOS process. The first ADC achieves 90.4dB Signal …

Contributors
EROL, OSMAN EMIR, Ozev, Sule, Kitchen, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2018

Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are substantially different from their bulk counterparts. These unique properties have gained recognition and application for various fields and products including sensors, displays, photovoltaics, and energy storage devices. Aerosol Deposition (AD) is a relatively new method for depositing nanomaterials. AD utilizes a nozzle to accelerate the nanomaterial into a deposition chamber under near-vacuum conditions towards a substrate with which the nanomaterial collides and adheres. Traditional methods for designing nozzles at atmospheric conditions are not well suited for nozzle design for AD methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, ANSYS Fluent, is utilized to simulate two-phase flows …

Contributors
Hoffman, Trent, Holman, Zachary C, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2017

Semiconductor nanolasers, as a frontier subject has drawn a great deal of attention over the past decade. Semiconductor nanolasers are compatible with on-chip integrations towards the ultimate realization of photonic integrated circuits. However, innovative approaches are strongly required to overcome the limitation of lattice-mismatch issues. In this dissertation, two alternative approaches are employed to overcome the lattice-mismatch issues. i) By taking advantage of nanowires or nanobelts techniques, flexibility in bandgap engineering has been greatly expanded, resulting in the nanolasers with wide wavelength coverage and tunability. Simultaneous two-color lasing in green and red is firstly achieved from monolithic cadmium sulfide selenide …

Contributors
Fan, Fan, Ning, Cun-Zheng, Balanis, Constantine A, et al.
Created Date
2016

In this work, transport in nanowire materials and nanowire field effect transistors is studied using a full band Monte Carlo simulator within the tight binding basis. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the importance of nanowires and nanoscale devices in present day electronics and the necessity to use a computationally efficient tool to simulate transport in these devices. Chapter 2 discusses the calculation of the full band structure of nanowires based on an atomistic tight binding approach, particularly noting the use of the exact same tight binding parameters for bulk band structures as well as the nanowire band structures. Chapter 3 …

Contributors
Hathwar, Raghuraj, Goodnick, Stephen M, Goodnick, Stephen M, et al.
Created Date
2016

To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, consisting of a remotely interrogating array of dipoles, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. In the present work a remotely interrogating slot antenna inside a 60nm …

Contributors
Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat, Diaz, Rodolfo E, Pan, George W, et al.
Created Date
2016

This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random Access Memory (CBRAM), which can be important for applications such as multi-bit memory as well as non-volatile logic and neuromorphic computing. First, experimental data from small signal, quasi-static and pulsed mode electrical characterization of such devices are presented which clearly demonstrate the inherent multi-level resistance programmability property in CBRAM devices. A physics based analytical CBRAM compact model is then presented which simulates the ion-transport dynamics and filamentary growth mechanism that …

Contributors
Mahalanabis, Debayan, Barnaby, Hugh J., Kozicki, Michael N., et al.
Created Date
2015

In the nano-regime many materials exhibit properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. These nano-properties have been shown to be useful in a wide range of applications with nanomaterials being used for catalysts, in energy production, as protective coatings, and in medical treatment. While there is no shortage of exciting and novel applications, the world of nanomaterials suffers from a lack of large scale manufacturing techniques. The current methods and equipment used for manufacturing nanomaterials are generally slow, expensive, potentially dangerous, and material specific. The research and widespread use of nanomaterials has undoubtedly been hindered by this lack …

Contributors
Firth, Peter, Holman, Zachary C, Kozicki, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2015