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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


A new class of layered materials called the transition metal trichalcogenides (TMTCs) exhibit strong anisotropic properties due to their quasi-1D nature. These 2D materials are composed of chain-like structures which are weakly bound to form planar sheets with highly directional properties. The vibrational properties of three materials from the TMTC family, specifically TiS3, ZrS3, and HfS3, are relatively unknown and studies performed in this work elucidates the origin of their Raman characteristics. The crystals were synthesized through chemical vapor transport prior to mechanical exfoliation onto Si/SiO¬2 substrates. XRD, AFM, and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the crystallinity, thickness, and …

Contributors
Kong, Wilson, Tongay, Sefaattin, Wang, Liping, et al.
Created Date
2017

Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide (titania or TiO2) offers enormous potential in solving energy and environmental problems. Immobilization of titania nanoparticles on inert substrates is an effective way of utilizing its photocatalytic activity since nanoparticles enable high mass-transport, and immobilization avoids post-treatment separation. For competitive photocatalytic performance, the morphology of the substrate can be engineered to enhance mass-transport and light accessibility. In this work, two types of fiber architectures (i.e., dispersed polymer/titania phase or D-phase, and multi-phase polymer-core/composite-shell fibers or M-phase) were explored as effective substrate solutions for anchoring titania. These fibers were fabricated using a low-cost and scalable fiber …

Contributors
Kanth, Namrata, Song, Kenan, Tongay, Sefaattin, et al.
Created Date
2020