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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Mime Type
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Although music is regarded as a universal language, it is rare to find musicians of different ages, ability levels, and backgrounds interacting with each other in collaborative performances. There is a dearth of mixed-ability-level wind band and string orchestra repertoire, and the few pieces that exist fail to celebrate the talents of the youngest and least-experienced performers. Composers writing music for school-age ensembles have also been excluded from the collaborative process, rarely communicating with the young musicians for whom they are writing. This project introduced twenty-nine compositions into the wind band and string orchestra repertoire via a collaboration that engaged …

Contributors
Brooks, Melanie Jane, Hill, Gary W, Caslor, Jason K, et al.
Created Date
2018

This philosophical inquiry explores the work of philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari and posits applications to music education. Through the concepts of multiplicities, becoming, bodies without organs, smooth spaces, maps, and nomads, Deleuze and Guattari challenge prior and current understandings of existence. In their writings on art, education, and how might one live, they assert a world consisting of variability and motion. Drawing on Deleuze and Guattari's emphasis on time and difference, I posit the following questions: Who and when are we? Where are we? When is music? When is education? Throughout this document, their philosophical figuration of a …

Contributors
Richerme, Lauren Kapalka, Stauffer, Sandra, Gould, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2013

This study investigated high school band students' processes of learning as well as their responses and reactions to student-led aural-based learning projects. Previous research has focused on various aspects of informal learning and student-centered learning--the frameworks upon which this study is based--but none have focused on inclusion of informal learning methods into a secondary large ensemble classroom setting with an emphasis on playing by ear. Participants in this study were 20 students divided into four small groups in a 45-member high school band. The study took place during the regularly scheduled band class during one full class period for eight …

Contributors
Spears, Amy Elizabeth, Schmidt, Marg, Sullivan, Jill, et al.
Created Date
2014

This study investigates degree perseverance among African Americans who transitioned from an undergraduate music program at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). A framework based on Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory and Yosso’s community cultural wealth theory was employed to examine how academic, cultural, and social aspects of participants’ undergraduate and graduate school experiences influenced their perseverance. Because those aspects are intricately intertwined with race, I also employed critical race theory and double consciousness theory, and used Angela Duckworth’s Grit Scale to measure degree perseverance. Eight African American male instrumental music educators participated in …

Contributors
McCall, Joyce Marie, Schmidt, Margaret E, Oldani, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2015

LGBTQ research in music education has become more available and accepted in the past ten years. LGBTQ studies in music education have focused on how gay and lesbian music educators negotiate their identities, the role of music education in the lives of transgender students, and the inclusion of LGBTQ issues in music teacher education programs. Studies have been limited to a singular content experience, such as gay vocal music educators or lesbian band directors. Additionally, studies have not explored multiple generations of LGBTQ music educators. The purpose of this study was to explore the lives as lived of six K-12 …

Contributors
Minette, Sarah Marie, Schmidt, Margaret, Stauffer, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2018

Guitar Hero III and similar games potentially offer a vehicle for improvement of musical rhythmic accuracy with training delivered in both visual and auditory formats and by use of its novel guitar-shaped interface; however, some theories regarding multimedia learning suggest sound is a possible source of extraneous cognitive load while playing so players may score higher with sound turned off. Also, existing studies have shown that differences in the physical format of interfaces affect learning outcomes. This study sought to determine whether (a) the game’s audio content affects rhythmic accuracy, and (b) the type of game controller used affects learning …

Contributors
Thomas, James William, Zuiker, Steven J, Atkinson, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2017

This research project was written simultaneously with a composition for double bass and piano that centers around improvisational concepts. The composition is intended for intermediate to advanced musicians to have an opportunity to practice improvisational performance and, hopefully, further their understanding and improve their ability to make convincing and creative musical decisions. Improvisation, an aspect of music that has a deep tradition in Western Classical music, is often feared by classical musicians. The lack of improvisation in classical music, the idea that it is a specialized skill, and the lack of encouragement from studio teachers contributes greatly to this fear. …

Contributors
Hedquist, Benjamin Patrick, Rotaru, Catalin, DeMars, James, et al.
Created Date
2017

Two different techniques utilizing vocalization in clarinet performance were examined through a research study in which one subject (the author) played several tasks utilizing each technique with different played pitches, vocalized pitches, and dynamic levels for each task. The first technique was singing while playing, which is also sometimes referred to as growling. This technique is produced by engaging the vocal folds during regular clarinet performance to create a second vocalized pitch that resonates in the oral cavity and exits through the mouthpiece as part of the same air stream as that used by the vibrating reed. The second technique …

Contributors
Ruth, Jeremy Larkham, Gardner, Joshua T, Spring, Robert S, et al.
Created Date
2019

ABSTRACT Korea’s first opera Chunhyang Jeon was composed by Jaemyeong Hyun in 1948. Until that time, most Korean vocal music was sung by a few native traditional artists. Inspired by their work, composer Hyun combined elements from the ancient Pansori (epic poetic forms presented by a solo singer with drum) and Western music techniques to create his opera. Hyun also used the more vernacular Hangeul (Korean alphabet) for his libretto rather than the Chinese usually heard in Korean theatrical presentations. It might be noted that in that same year (1948), the first Western opera: Verdi’s La Traviata was performed in …

Contributors
Shin, Jinhee, Britton, David, Dreyfoos, Dale, et al.
Created Date
2017

The focus of this in-depth study is to look at the gestation, performance history, and reception of Giacomo Puccini's evening of three one-act operas called Il Trittico and differentiate the particular components, Il Tabarro, Suor Angelica, and Gianni Schicchi to analyze them for their individual stylistic elements of Italian Opera. These were the styles of verismo, pathos and sentimentality, and opera buffa. As substantiated by written criticism, the audience and the critics did not fully comprehend the hidden meaning behind the individual works of Il Trittico. Puccini, enigmatically, had chosen to present one last glimpse of outmoded Italian operatic traditions. …

Contributors
Scovasso, Stephen, Oldani, Robert W., Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015