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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2004 2020


You Are Here: A choreographic memoir exploring anxiety in the YouTube generation is an evening-length performance which began as an interdisciplinary exploration of the therapeutic properties of creative writing and creative movement. Throughout the creation of this performance, the choreographer engaged in self-reflection from which arose the themes of anxiety, the Internet, and identity. As a result of this experience, she reached conclusions regarding her personal voice and agency, interdisciplinary art as therapy, the importance of dance as a coping mechanism in digital cultures, and a definition of the therapeutic process of choreographic memoir. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Dorn, Katherine, Dyer, Becky, Mitchell, John D, et al.
Created Date
2017

This research examines data exchange between city departments and external stakeholders; particularly, why city departments have different capacity to access data from departments in the same city, other public agencies, private and nonprofit organizations. Data access is of theoretical interest because it provides the opportunity to investigate how public organizations and public managers deal with a portfolio of relationships in a loosely structured context characterized by dynamics of power and influence. Moreover, enhancing data access is important for public managers to increase the amount and diversity of information available to design, implement, and support public services and policies. Drawing from ...

Contributors
Fusi, Federica, Feeney, Mary K., Welch, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2018

This dissertation investigated positive intergroup contact and communication in the experiences of fans at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Guided by concepts from Intergroup Contact Theory (ICT), formerly Allport’s (1954) Contact Hypothesis, I asked fans to identify and discuss factors that were relevant to their experiences at the event. These factors are reported in previous literature to foster positive intergroup relations. The fan participants also provided detailed, experience-based rationales for why and how the factors supported each other and created individual models of their experiences of ICT at the Olympics. The study relied on participant-centered, in-depth ...

Contributors
Brenneman, Luke, Alberts, Janet, Broome, Benjamin, et al.
Created Date
2017

This experiment uses the Community of Knowledge framework to better understand how jurors interpret new information (Sloman & Rabb, 2016). Participants learned of an ostensibly new scientific finding that was claimed to either be well-understood or not understood by experts. Despite including no additional information, expert understanding led participants to believe that they personally understood the phenomenon, with expert understanding acting as a cue for trustworthiness and believability. This effect was particularly pronounced with low-quality sources. These results are discussed in the context of how information is used by jurors in court, and the implications of the “Community of Knowledge” ...

Contributors
Jones, Ashley C. T., Schweitzer, Nicholas J., Neal, Tess M.S., et al.
Created Date
2018

Research has shown that a developmental process of maturing out of alcohol involvement occurs during young adulthood, and that this process is related to both young adult role transitions (e.g., marriage) and personality developmental (e.g., decreased disinhibition and neuroticism). The current study extended past research by testing whether protective marriage and personality effects on maturing out were stronger among more severe late adolescent drinkers, and whether protective marriage effects were stronger among those who experienced more personality development. Parental alcoholism and gender were tested as moderators of marriage, personality, and late adolescent drinking effects on maturing out; and as distal ...

Contributors
Lee, Matthew Ryan, Chassin, Laurie, Corbin, William R, et al.
Created Date
2013

At their cores, both rhetoric and public sphere theory have conceptualized how membership in public and counterpublic settings, as well as participation in public life and discussion, is cultivated, shared, contested, and shaped. Previous case studies on publics and counterpublics have looked at the experiences of individuals and collectives who enact practices in rhetorical invention that mark participation in public life. Much of public sphere scholarship focuses squarely on seasoned individuals in positions of authority and decision making in mainstream publics. Conversely, counterpublic spheres focus on the labor of individuals who have extensive experience in articulating discursive practices in response ...

Contributors
Flores, Carlos Augusto, Brouwer, Daniel C, Hess, Aaron R, et al.
Created Date
2018

The purpose of this study was to identify the algebraic reasoning abilities of young students prior to instruction. The goals of the study were to determine the influence of problem, problem type, question, grade level, and gender on: (a) young children’s abilities to predict the number of shapes in near and far positions in a “growing” pattern without assistance; (b) the nature and amount of assistance needed to solve the problems; and (c) reasoning methods employed by children. The 8-problem Growing Patterns and Functions Assessment (GPFA), with an accompanying interview protocol, were developed to respond to these goals. Each problem ...

Contributors
Cavanagh, Mary C., Greenes, Carole E, Buss, Ray, et al.
Created Date
2016

This dissertation examines how young children engage with digital games at home and how parents think and talk about their children's digital gaming. This is an ethnographic case study of the digital game playing of six three-year-old children in six families. This study combines ethnographic methods and critical perspectives to construct analyses that have the potential to rethink young children's digital game play. The focus of this study is on understanding how digital gaming functions in children's everyday lives. This study shows that young children's digital game play takes place in the interstices of their everyday family life. Digital games ...

Contributors
Huh, Youn Jung, Tobin, Joseph, Nakagawa, Kathryn, et al.
Created Date
2015

As climate change becomes a greater challenge in today's society, it is critical to understand young people's perceptions of the phenomenon because they will become the next generation of decision-makers. This study examines knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors among high school students. The subjects of this study include students from high school science classes in Phoenix, Arizona, and Plainfield, Illinois. Using surveys and small group interviews to engage students in two climatically different locations, three questions were answered: 1) What do American students know and believe about climate change? How is knowledge related to beliefs? 2) What types of behaviors are ...

Contributors
Kruke, Laurel, Larson, Kelli, Klinsky, Sonja, et al.
Created Date
2015

Food security literature has a heavy emphasis on physical barriers, often employing spatial analysis or market-based approaches, but the human dimensions of food security remain unexplored. This has resulted in a disconnect between the understanding of the problem and proposed interventions, as the contextual factors and lived experiences of residents are not considered. There are many barriers and opportunities for food security that are not spatially fixed (e.g. family relations, social capital) that may be important but are unrepresented in these types of studies. In order to capture these barriers and opportunities, community stakeholders need to play a fundamental role ...

Contributors
Schoon, Briar Dayne, Eakin, Hallie, Wharton, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2012