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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2019


A New Home is a multi-movement musical composition written for a chamber orchestra of flute, oboe, clarinet in B-flat, bassoon, horn in F, trumpet in C, trombone, bass trombone, percussion (1), pianoforte, and strings. The duration of the entire piece is approximately fourteen minutes (movement 1: four minutes; mvt. 2: four minutes and thirty seconds; mvt. 3: five minutes and thirty seconds). As an exercise in compositional experimentation, some of the musical techniques explored throughout the piece are harmonic planing or parallelism, ostinati, modality, chromatic dissonance, thematic transformation, mixed meter, and syncopation, as well as issues of orchestral blend, balance, …

Contributors
Jones, Zachary William, Rogers, Rodney, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

Johann Sebastian Bach's violin Sonata I in G minor, BWV 1001, is a significant and widely performed work that exists in numerous editions and also as transcriptions or arrangements for various other instruments, including the guitar. A pedagogical guitar performance edition of this sonata, however, has yet to be published. Therefore, the core of my project is a transcription and pedagogical edition of this work for guitar. The transcription is supported by an analysis, performance and pedagogical practice guide, and a recording. The analysis and graphing of phrase structures illuminate Bach's use of compositional devices and the architectural function of …

Contributors
Felice, Joseph Philip, Koonce, Frank, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2013

Yuko Uébayashi is a composer who was born in Japan and presently resides in France. She composed Misericordia for Flute and String Quartet for Carol Wincenc in 2013. The National Flute Association (NFA), the most active flute society in America, hosted the Misericordia performance during its annual convention in Chicago in 2014. Uébayashi’s flute works have not only been frequently performed at NFA conventions, but also at other well-known flute festivals since 2006, the year of her U.S. debut. Many current flutists are motivated to learn and play her compositions; however, there is little published literature about her works. Understanding …

Contributors
Ham, Na Young, Buck, Elizabeth, Campbell, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2019

Composers and performers alike are pushing the limits of expression with an ever-expanding sonic palette. There has also been a great expansion of saxophone repertoire over the past few decades. This has lead to an increasing number of advanced pieces incorporating saxophone extended techniques. As younger saxophonists discover these compositions, they too become inspired to implement these techniques in their own playing. There is a need for broader selections of introductory to intermediate compositions with saxophone extended techniques. It is the goal of this project to expand this repertoire for pre-college and early-college saxophonists. These target-level saxophonists are those who …

Contributors
Charbonneau, Christopher Michael, Creviston, Christopher, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015

This project features three new pieces for clarinet commissioned from three different composers. Two are for unaccompanied clarinet and one is for clarinet, bass clarinet, and laptop. These pieces are Storm's a Comin' by Chris Burton, Light and Shadows by Theresa Martin, and My Own Agenda by Robbie McCarthy. These three solos challenge the performer in various ways including complex rhythm, use of extended techniques such as growling, glissando, and multiphonics, and the incorporation of technology into a live performance. In addition to background information, a performance practice guide has also been included for each of the pieces. This guide …

Contributors
Vaughan, Melissa Lynn, Spring, Robert, Micklich, Albie, et al.
Created Date
2013

Compared to sacred choral music of the great Spanish composers of the Renaissance, church music of later Spanish composers is relatively ignored, despite the fact that many left behind a significant body of works worthy of scholarly investigation and performance. In fact, there is a paucity of information on eighteenth-century church music in Spain - music history books generally treat the subject in the briefest way. To correct this situation, scholars must delve into the large caches of unpublished works from this period, which lie dormant in the archives of religious institutions. Even contextualizing these works is difficult, because so …

Contributors
Gorton, William Paul, Feisst, Sabine, Demars, James, et al.
Created Date
2013

Voicing, as it pertains to saxophone pedagogy, presents certain obstacles to both teachers and students simply because we cannot visually assess the internal mechanics of the vocal tract. The teacher is then left to instruct based on subjective “feel” which can lead to conflicting instruction, and in some cases, misinformation. In an effort to expand the understanding and pedagogical resources available, ten subjects—comprised of graduate-level and professional-level saxophonists—performed varied pitch bend tasks while their tongue motion was imaged ultrasonographically and recorded. Tongue range of motion was measured from midsagittal tongue contours extracted from the ultrasound data using a superimposed polar …

Contributors
Lemoine, Ryan Cole, Gardner, Joshua T, Creviston, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2016

Sofia Gubaidulina’s Dancer on a Tightrope (Der Seiltänzer, 1993) for violin and piano is an excellent example of the sonic capabilities of both instruments. To convey the balance and uncertainty of a circus act, Gubaidulina makes ample use of rhythmic variation, flexible melodic gestures, compound meters, dissonance, and indeterminacy in notation of musical time. Due to the intricate nature of both parts, this can be a difficult work to perform accurately. This paper is an accompanying document to the score to explain notations, suggest performance techniques for both instruments, and provide a thorough analysis of the complete work. Students of …

Contributors
Birch, Alexandra, McLin, Katherine, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2017

Formed in 1999, BCM International, comprised of composers Eric Whitacre, Jonathan Newman, Steven Bryant, and James (Jim) Bonney dedicated itself to publishing repertoire in the wind band medium. This project focuses on the work of these four composers, who, at the beginning of the “digital age,” joined together to create a new entrepreneurial and self-published entity. This paper aims to discuss their contribution to the wind band medium, thereby adding to the genre’s body of research. Similarly to previous investigations of this sort, the author will: 1) offer a biographical sketch through the lens of each individual composer; 2) discuss …

Contributors
Blanco III, Charlie G., Hill, Gary W, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

The purpose of this project is to introduce Bryan Johanson's composition for two guitars, 13 Ways of Looking at 12 Strings, and present an authoritative recording appropriate for publishing. This fifty-minute piece represents a fascinating suite in thirteen movements. The author of this project performed both guitar parts, recorded them separately in a music studio, then mixed them together into one recording. This document focuses on the critical investigation and description of the piece with a brief theoretical analysis, a discussion of performance difficulties, and guitar preparation. The composer approved the use and the scope of this project. Bryan Johanson …

Contributors
Savic, Nenad, Koonce, Frank, Rotaru, Catalin, et al.
Created Date
2011

“by my death...” is a composition in three movements for chamber ensemble and laptop ensemble, with the instrumentation of clarinet in Bb, French horn in F, percussion, violin, double bass, and at least three laptops. The total duration of the piece is approximately twenty minutes. However, since the timing of the first and third movement is flexible, the total duration may vary. “by my death...” is the creative culmination of my research into representations of the Holocaust in music. More specifically, it corresponds to my analysis of three Holocaust-based works by the Israeli composer Arie Shapira (1943-2015): Gideon Kleins Marterstrasse …

Contributors
Dori, Gil, Suzuki, Kotoka, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

Even in the most despondent situations, the arts find a way to flourish. This research document examines the vocal music that Viktor Ullmann composed in the concentration camp-ghetto of Theresienstadt in German-occupied Czechoslovakia, and the notable aspects of his compositional writing style. Although his opera Der Kaiser von Atlantis has been performed globally, the remainder of his oeuvre has rarely been recorded or performed. Singers often shy away from twentieth-century composers such as Ullmann, with claims that the music is not lyrical or relatable. Perhaps the irregularity of the meter, rhythms, or intervals seem too daunting for many to consider …

Contributors
Goglia, Adrienne Ruth, FitzPatrick, Carole, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2018

CYOA is a prototype of an iPhone application that produces a single, generative, musical work. This document details some of the thoughts and practices that informed its design, and specifically addresses the overlap between application structure and musical form. The concept of composed instruments is introduced and briefly discussed, some features of video game design that relate to this project are considered, and some specifics of hardware implementation are addressed. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Peterson, Julian Brian, Hackbarth, Glenn, Demars, James, et al.
Created Date
2013

The percussion jazz ensemble is a long-established yet rare component of 21st century percussion studios in the United States. While many American collegiate programs have percussion ensembles that perform jazz-based pieces, none are identified as a “percussion jazz ensemble.” This may be for a variety of reasons. Professors may not have considered adding a percussion jazz ensemble to their program because of its scarcity in American universities. Including such a class would be challenging if the instructors did not feel comfortable or familiar enough with jazz idioms and vernacular. Additionally, very few compositions or arrangements are available for this group. …

Contributors
Moreau, Danielle, Smith, Jeffrey, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

Since 1999, a small group of groundbreaking orchestral works for turntables and orchestra has surfaced on the concert stage. These compositions explore the possibilities of the turntables and invite an intriguing fusion of musical cultures of the classically trained musician and the hip-hop DJ. Since DJ turntablists typically follow an improvised tradition and do not read music, the composer must find an effective means of notating the turntables and collaborate with the turntablist in the execution of the work. As interest in turntables composition grows, there is a need for discussion and a compositional guide with advice based on present …

Contributors
Ouper, Jeffrey Thomas, Hackbarth, Glenn, Standley, Eileen, et al.
Created Date
2014

The focus of this in-depth study is to look at the gestation, performance history, and reception of Giacomo Puccini's evening of three one-act operas called Il Trittico and differentiate the particular components, Il Tabarro, Suor Angelica, and Gianni Schicchi to analyze them for their individual stylistic elements of Italian Opera. These were the styles of verismo, pathos and sentimentality, and opera buffa. As substantiated by written criticism, the audience and the critics did not fully comprehend the hidden meaning behind the individual works of Il Trittico. Puccini, enigmatically, had chosen to present one last glimpse of outmoded Italian operatic traditions. …

Contributors
Scovasso, Stephen, Oldani, Robert W., Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015

When dancers are granted agency over music, as in interactive dance systems, the actors are most often concerned with the problem of creating a staged performance for an audience. However, as is reflected by the above quote, the practice of Argentine tango social dance is most concerned with participants internal experience and their relationship to the broader tango community. In this dissertation I explore creative approaches to enrich the sense of connection, that is, the experience of oneness with a partner and complete immersion in music and dance for Argentine tango dancers by providing agency over musical activities through the …

Contributors
Brown, Courtney Douglass, Paine, Garth, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2017

The Space Race (1957–1975), a period of rapid technological advancements prompted by the uncertainty and fear of the Cold War, captured the curiosity and attention of many artists, filmmakers and composers. Their responses, recorded in a multitude of works from various genres, reflect the overall tone and mirror societal views in the midst of uncertain, politically-charged times. My thesis explores two seminal American artists who explored outer space in numerous works. John Cage (1912–1992), an avant-garde classical composer, wrote such works as Atlas Eclipticalis (1961), Etudes Australes (1974–75), and the Freeman Etudes (1977–1980), all composed using star-maps. Sun Ra (1914–1993), …

Contributors
Ivis, Andrea, Feisst, Sabine, Wells, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2017

Hungarian composer, Miklós Rózsa, is primarily known for his career as a film composer, but he wrote over forty-five pieces for the concert hall. The most famous of these works, Theme, Variations, and Finale, was composed in 1933 and premiered the following year, ushering in a long history of performances throughout Europe and abroad in the 1930s and 1940s. This document serves as a guide for performers of Theme, Variations, and Finale by offering biographical information about Rózsa, the compositional history and performance history of the work and recorded legacy, details about its two versions, and a detailed analysis of …

Contributors
Alpizar, Mark Daniel, Meyer, Jeffery, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2018

Music is often used to induce relaxation and encourage calm surroundings, but in a group psychiatric treatment environment creating such a space can be complicated by varying and conflicting music preferences. Although best practices in music therapy encourage use of preferred music in sessions, adolescents’ tastes can be so closely tied with their sense of identity that tension may arise between peers in a group setting. On an inpatient adolescent psychiatric unit this issue becomes compounded by additional factors such as inadequate communication skills and difficulties with self-regulation. Although one must be careful not to generalize or romanticize, current literature …

Contributors
Powers, Melissa Marie, Rio, Robin, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2018

The Sonata for Cello and Piano (1915) was one of the last three sonatas written by Claude Debussy (1862–1918). When Debussy composed the sonata, France was involved in World War I and Debussy was influenced by political dogmas that sought to advance nationalism as well as the use of French traditions in musical compositions. By discussing the political impact of World War I on French music, this paper will place the Sonata in a context that strengthens the understanding of the work. Debussy, who participated in the political project of seeking out tradition as the protector of French culture, also …

Contributors
SONG, PEIPEI, Ryan, Russell, Campbell, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2016

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, musicologists have been delving into formerly inaccessible archives and publishing new research on Eastern Bloc composers. Much of the English-language scholarship, however, has focused on already well-known composers from Russia or Poland. In contrast, composers from smaller countries such as the Czech Republic (formerly Czechoslovakia) have been neglected. In this thesis, I shed light on the new music scene in Czechoslovakia from 1948–1989, specifically during the period of “Normalization” (1969–1989). The period of Normalization followed a cultural thaw, and beginning in 1969 the Czechoslovak government attempted to restore control. Many Czech and Slovak …

Contributors
Johnson, Victoria K., Feisst, Sabine, Oldani, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2015

This composition was commissioned by the Orgelpark to be performed in Amsterdam in September 2011 during Gaudeamus Muziekweek. It will be performed by the vocal group VocaalLab Nederland. It is scored for four vocalists, organ, tanpura, and electronic sound. The work is a culmination of my studies in South Indian Carnatic rhythm, North Indian classical singing, and American minimalism. It is a meditation on the idea that the drone and pulse are micro/macro aspects of the same phenomenon of vibration. Cycles are created on the macroscale through a mathematically defined scale of harmonic/pitch relationships. Cycles are created on the microscale …

Contributors
Adler, Jacob, Rockmaker, Jody, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2011

Profound alterations to instruments that take place over short periods of time are fascinating, and the changes undergone by the guitar during the late eighteenth century make for an intriguing transition in the instrument's history. The guitar that existed before 1750 is most commonly referred to as the 'Baroque guitar' and is vastly different from the guitar of today. It was considerably smaller than the guitars that followed, pitched higher, and used primarily for accompaniment through chord strumming. From roughly 1750 to 1800 the guitar underwent a transformation that eventually led to the design and performance practices that have continued …

Contributors
Copeland, Jeffrey Nathaniel, Koonce, Frank, Aspnes, Lynne, et al.
Created Date
2012

Technological advancements in computers and audio software and hardware devices in the twenty-first century have led to the expansion of possibilities for music composition, including works for acoustic instruments and live electronics. Electroacoustic composition is rapidly and continually evolving, and much that has been written about compositional techniques for percussion and live electronics is becoming outdated. Live electronics include performer-triggered events, audio processing, electronic responses to various inputs, and electronic decision-making during live performances. These techniques can be employed in a variety of ways. This project sheds light on how modern composers of different musical and cultural backgrounds reimagine the …

Contributors
Wier, Alexander Carl, Smith, Jeffrey, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015

Piano Quintet> is a three movement piece, inspired by music of Eastern Europe. Sunrise in Hungary starts with a legato song in the first violin unfolding over slow moving sustained harmonics in the rest of the strings. This is contrasted with a lively Hungarian dance which starts in the piano and jumps throughout all of the voices. Armenian Lament introduces a mournful melody performed over a subtly shifting pedal tone in the cello. The rest of the voices are slowly introduced until the movement builds into a canonic threnody. Evening in Bulgaria borrows from the vast repertoire of Bulgarian dances, …

Contributors
Giese, Adam, Hackbarth, Glenn, Demars, James, et al.
Created Date
2014

Throughout history composers and artists have been inspired by the natural world. Nature's influence on music is extraordinary, though water in particular, has had a unique magnetic pull. The large number of compositions dealing with water, from Handel's Water Music (1717) to Ros Bandt's and Leah Barclay's Rivers Talk (2012), reflects this continuous fascination. Since the late 1940s, composers have ventured further and brought actual sounds from the environment, including water recorded on tape, into the musical arena. Moreover, since the 1960s, some composers have nudged their listeners to become more ecologically aware. Much skepticism exists, as with any unconventional …

Contributors
Richardson, Jamilyn, Feisst, Sabine, Solís, Ted, et al.
Created Date
2012

Since its inception, the American Broadway industry has flourished and grown to include numerous vocal styles and techniques. The early twenty-first century has seen a rapid increase in demand for collegiate courses and instructors pertaining to music theater. It has therefore become necessary for voice instructors to be equally comfortable teaching both music theater and classical techniques such as bel canto. This document serves as a resource for instructors seeking more information on defining and teaching vocal styles in music theater including legit, mix, and belt. The first two chapters address the following three questions: 1) What is bel canto …

Contributors
Bruton, Sara, Weiss, Stephanie, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2018

An integral part of the avant-garde movement in 1920s Paris, the American composer George Antheil collaborated with writers Ezra Pound and James Joyce, violinist Olga Rudge, and befriended the likes of Pablo Picasso, Man Ray, and many others. In Paris, Antheil found great success as the provocateur of riots and scandal at his concerts, with a purposefully controversial compositional style. This document explores, in detail, his three violin sonatas composed between 1923 and 1924 at the behest of Ezra Pound for his violinist friend Rudge. The violin sonatas provide a fascinating perspective on Antheil's musical and personal life during his …

Contributors
Leland, Hannah Christina, McLin, Katherine, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015

ABSTRACT Torse III (1965) by Akira Miyoshi, Two Movements for Marimba (1965) by Toshimistu Tanaka, and Time for Marimba (1968) by Minoru Miki have remained “tour de force” pieces in the marimba repertoire since their inception nearly fifty years ago, yet they continue to present significant performance and interpretative issues to each new generation of marimbists. This document will serve as both a performance guide for advanced marimba performers, as well as provide insight into the aesthetic qualities that contribute to their lasting artistic significance. Each piece will receive a designated chapter discussing the historical context, technical challenges, and general …

Contributors
Holm, Matthew Douglas, Smith, Jeffrey b, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

Samuel Máynez Prince (1886-1966), was a prolific and important Mexican musician. Prince’s musical style followed the trends of the nineteenth-century salon music genre. His compositions include lullabies, songs, dances, marches, mazurkas, waltzes, and revolutionary anthems. Prince’s social status and performances in the famed Café Colón in Mexico City increased his popularity among high-ranking political figures during the time of the Mexican Revolution as well as his status in the Mexican music scene. Unfortunately there is virtually no existing scholarship on Prince and even basic information regarding his life and works is not readily available. The lack of organization of the …

Contributors
Ekenes, Spencer, McLin, Katherine, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2016

THE PEACOCK FLIES SOUTHEAST is a work for Qudi and orchestra inspired by an ancient Chinese love story of the same title. The Qudi is also known as the "Chinese bamboo flute." It is similar to the Western piccolo. However, it has open tone holes with greater ability to bend pitches. The Qudi sounds one octave above the written music with arrange from A4 to G7. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Li, Wanchen, Demars, James, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2014

In the early-twentieth-century United States, Jewish and European immigrant scholars, musicians, and composers dominated the academic, orchestral, film and popular music scenes. While some of these musicians immigrated voluntarily, others, having fled the genocide of the Holocaust, were forced into exile due to religious and political persecution. Musicians were often targeted by the Nazi regime for performing and advancing banned music, composing modernist works, or for their religious or political beliefs. The United States upheld strict, pre-World War Two immigration quotas and laws that limited relocation. Specialized rescue agencies arose to help these exiles settle in the United States. Meanwhile …

Contributors
Kurland, Jayme, Norton, Kay, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2015

The solo repertoire from the Light Music Era serves as an important link between the Classical and Jazz soloist traditions. These characteristics are best highlighted through an analysis of three solo transcriptions: Felix Arndt's Nola as performed by Al Gallodoro, Rudy Wiedoeft's Valse Vanité, as performed by Freddy Gardener, and Jimmy Dorsey's Oodles of Noodles, as performed by Al Gallodoro. The transcriptions, done by the author, are taken from primary source recordings, and the ensuing analysis serves to show the saxophone soloists of the Light Music Era as an amalgamation of classical and jazz saxophone. Many of the works performed …

Contributors
Puccio, Daniel Scott, Mcallister, Timothy P, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2012

In the 1930s, with the rise of Nazism, many artists in Europe had to flee their homelands and sought refuge in the United States. Austrian composer Hanns Eisler who had risen to prominence as a significant composer during the Weimar era was among them. A Jew, an ardent Marxist and composer devoted to musical modernism, he had established himself as a writer of film music and Kampflieder, fighting songs, for the European workers' movement. After two visits of the United States in the mid-1930s, Eisler settled in America where he spent a decade (1938-1948), composed a considerable number of musical …

Contributors
Boyd, Caleb Taylor, Feisst, Sabine, Levy, Benjamin, et al.
Created Date
2013

Three Meditations on the Philosophy of Boethius is a musical piece for guitar, piano interior, and computer. Each of the three movements, or meditations, reflects one level of music according to the medieval philosopher Boethius: Musica Mundana, Musica Humana, and Musica Instrumentalis. From spatial aspects, through the human element, to letting sound evolve freely, different movements revolve around different sounds and sound producing techniques. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Dori, Gil, Hackbarth, Glenn, Demars, James, et al.
Created Date
2013

This study examines the effectiveness of various types of alternative resources in organ building in order to determine whether a change to more sustainable materials would benefit or hinder the overall sound production of the instrument. The qualities of the metals and woods currently used in organ production (e.g. lead, walnut, etc.) have been prized for centuries, so the substitution of different, more sustainable materials must be considered with regards to the sonic alterations, as well as the financial implications, of using alternatives to make the organ more “green.” Five organ builders were interviewed regarding their views on sustainable materials. …

Contributors
Gregoire, Jonathan M., Marshall, Kimberly, Feisst, Sabine, et al.
Created Date
2014

To be a versatile violinist, one needs interdependence of aural, visual and kinesthetic skills. This thesis introduces aural, visual and kinesthetic learning modalities, and explores the way each is used in the Suzuki, Paul Rolland, Orff, Kodály, and Dalcroze methods, as well as in Edwin Gordon’s Musical Learning Theory. Other methods and pedagogical approaches were consulted and influential in developing the curriculum, such as the teaching of Mimi Zweig, but were not included in this paper either because of an overlap with other methods or insufficient comparable material. This paper additionally presents a new curriculum for teaching beginning violin that …

Contributors
Tang, Tee Tong, Swartz, Jonathan, Schmidt, Margaret, et al.
Created Date
2017

Musicians have the potential to experience health problems related to their profession. The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) requires schools to provide information about wellness. There are 634 degree-granting, not for profit, NASM accredited postsecondary music schools in America. This study examined the types of wellness resources offered at 387 of these schools or 60%. Wellness information was divided into three categories: physical, psychological and hearing. The types of resources offered, category of information and the size of the school were considered. Schools were emailed and their websites were searched for wellness information. Forty-eight percent of the schools …

Contributors
Fraser, Catherine, Spring, Robert, Gardner, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2016