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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Language
  • English
Subject
Date Range
2010 2020


English proficiency is one of the major factors affecting international students’ academic adjustment to American universities. Many international college students select to improve their academic English proficiency through an English intensive program. Collaborative learning is an educational approach to teaching and learning that allows students and teachers to engage in a common task and work together to search for knowledge and skills. This thesis study aims to develop, design, and iteratively refine strategies to help English intensive program teachers build collaborative learning and promote international students’ effective collaboration, so as to improve students' academic English proficiency. In this study, two …

Contributors
Nolastname, Digengni, Wolf, Leigh Graves, Zuiker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2020

This graduate thesis explains and discusses the background, methods, limitations, and future work of developing a low-budget, variable-length, Arduino-based robotics professional development program (PDP) for middle school or high school classrooms. This graduate thesis builds on prior undergraduate thesis work and conclusions. The main conclusions from the undergraduate thesis work focused on reaching a larger teacher population along with providing a more robust robot design and construction. The end goal of this graduate thesis is to develop a PDP that reaches multiple teachers, involves a more robust robot design, and lasts beyond this developmental year. There have been many similar …

Contributors
lerner, jonah, Carberry, Adam, Walters, Molina, et al.
Created Date
2020

Cancer has a financial impact worldwide. According to a study published by the American Cancer Society, “cancer accounts for 1.5% of global gross domestic product loss per year” (John & Ross, 2010). The legal and economic costs of death are not something normally addressed with patients prior to the occurrence of death. With an integrative approach, education may help reduce financial stressors for both the patient and family, while offering cost saving benefits to the facilities involved. Studies have shown that education pertaining to advanced care planning help to reduce hospital visits and the costs associated with the last six …

Contributors
Simundson, Julie Lynn, Rodriguez, Yolanda, Scheall, Scott, et al.
Created Date
2020

The education and criminal justice systems have developed in relation to one another, intersected through specific events, policies, practices, and discourses that have ultimately shaped the experiences and lives of children of color. Racism, white supremacy, and oppression are foundational to the United States and evident in all systems, structures, and institutions. Exploring the various contexts in which the education and criminal justice systems have developed illuminates their coalescence in contemporary United States society and more specifically, in public schools. Public schools now operate under discipline regimes that criminalize the behavior of Black and Brown children through exclusionary practices and …

Contributors
Nunez-Eddy, Emily Nicole, Broberg, Gregory, Swadener, Beth Blue, et al.
Created Date
2020

The purposes of this dissertation are two-fold. First, it aims to re-examine the new generation of Chinese students in the United States (U.S.) in light of the changing international and educational contexts. Second, the dissertation seeks to understand the new generation of Chinese students’ experience in First-year Composition (FYC) classes in a public U.S. university. A model of dynamic sociocultural approach is developed and applied to explore this new generation of Chinese students. Compared to previous generations of overseas students, the new generation is substantially different in their backgrounds and shares their own unique characteristics. Taking a sociocultural approach, this …

Contributors
Liu, Jianing, Matsuda, Paul Kei, Matsuda, Aya, et al.
Created Date
2020

The profession known as industrial design is undergoing a transformation. Design thinking and strategy are replacing form giving and styling. Critics are calling for curricular reform to meet the changing needs of practice, yet surprisingly little knowledge is available about how and why design teachers do what they do. In an effort to frame the problem of (re)designing design education, this study provides a framework for understanding the pedagogical beliefs and preferences of design students and educators utilizing Bruner’s four folk pedagogies. This study also provides evidence that the practices of industrial design teachers exhibit what Cross (2006) has described …

Contributors
Christensen, Tamara Fawn, Nocek, Adam, Brooks, Kenneth, et al.
Created Date
2020

ABSTRACT Parental involvement is vital to student success academically as well as socially (Jeynes, 2007; Kim & Hill, 2015). The purpose of this mixed-methods action research study was to examine the perceptions of parental involvement of parents and teachers in a Title I school. A training session intervention, Social Hour, was designed using the Heath and Heath change model (2010) to create an opportunity to learn about parental involvement and educate the school community on the Epstein’s six-types of parental involvement (Epstein, 1987). The goal of the Social Hour workshop was to address the challenges and barriers to parental involvement, …

Contributors
Dery-Chaffin, Margaret, Wylie, Ruth, Orozco, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2020

Students across the United States of America are struggling to achieve college and career readiness in reading before they graduate from high school. The phenomenon of reading comprehension in older adolescent students plagues teachers because of its complexity and the perceived need for multiple solutions. However, close inspection of the research reveals factors such as self-efficacy, motivation, and lack of skills with regards to using reading strategies all contribute to the problem. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of sketchnoting as a reading strategy on student self-efficacy for reading, motivation for reading, and reading comprehension in …

Contributors
Treptow, Jennifer, Wylie, Ruth, Peyton Marsh, Josephine, et al.
Created Date
2020

This action research project was a concurrent mixed method case study design The purpose of this action research study was to begin to understand how an institution of higher education can best support creativity and innovation of university staff members. More specifically this study looked at the influence of a design thinking workshop on university staff perceived creative and innovative ability. Additionally, this study looked at the influence of individual attributes on staff creativity, and the influence of organizational attributes on staff innovation. Amabile and Pratt’s Dynamic Component Model of Creativity and Innovation in Organizations informed this study. Participants for …

Contributors
Morgan, Chad William, Judson, Eugene, Kim, Jeongeun, et al.
Created Date
2020

The traditional analysis, design, develop, implement, and evaluate (ADDIE) model is inadequate for dealing with the instructional design requirements of today’s constantly evolving world. This reality is especially true at the National Simulation Center where medicine and technology are constantly changing. To provide the best care for the nation’s veterans, the educational products must too reflect the current state of medicine. The Agile ADDIE Framework was developed to overcome challenges such as a constantly changing domain, external threats to the development process, and the need for expedited timelines while still creating quality products. Using agile theory, including the agile manifesto, …

Contributors
Borgwing, Jonathan Lars, Rotheram-Fuller, Erin, Parsons, Odas, et al.
Created Date
2020

This interpretive dissertation study sought to understand what happened when a seventh-grade teacher introduced multimodal concepts and texts into his English Language Arts classroom. Multimodal texts contain linguistic features (words and sentences) but also images and graphic design features. The classroom teacher described himself as a novice with regards to multimodal literacies instruction and had previously focused predominantly on written or spoken texts. Motivating his decision to design and enact a multimodal literacies pedagogy was his belief that students needed to garner experience interpreting and composing the kinds of texts that populated his students’ social worlds. Therefore, I asked: What …

Contributors
Reid, Stephanie Francesca, Serafini, Frank, Moses, Lindsey, et al.
Created Date
2020

The problem of practice addressed in this mixed methods action research study is the underachievement of fifth-grade students in mathematics. This study explores the effects of an innovation designed to help students develop a growth mindset by utilizing self-regulation strategies to improve academic growth in mathematics. Students’ underachievement in mathematics has been illustrated by both state and international assessments. Throughout the decades, mathematics instruction and reforms have varied, but overall students’ psychological needs have been neglected. This innovation was designed to develop students’ psychological characteristics regarding facing challenges in mathematics. For this purpose, two guiding theories were utilized to frame …

Contributors
Manchester, Sarah, Judson, Eugene, Moses, Lindsey, et al.
Created Date
2020

In this multi-media dissertation, water is used metaphorically to equate the process of learning with embracing change. Paradigm shifts needed for sustainability require transformative learning where one is open to being shaped by new knowledge and experience. Properties of water – such as molecular bonding and phase changes – uncover lessons for humans’ adaptability. Given that human bodies are comprised mostly of water – what implications exist for human capacity to similarly undergo continuous change? An arts- based research methodology is practiced to produce a four-chapter project. Artistic methods of data collection and communication retain subjective complexity of lived experiences …

Contributors
Movahed, Neda Y, Manuel-Navarrete, David, Lerman, Liz, et al.
Created Date
2020

The dissertation addresses questions tied in to the challenges posed by the impact of environmental factors on the nonlinear dynamics of social upward mobility. The proportion of educated individuals from various socio-economic backgrounds is used as a proxy for the environmental impact on the status quo state. Chapter 1 carries out a review of the mobility models found in the literature and sets the economic context of this dissertation. Chapter 2 explores a simple model that considers poor and rich classes and the impact that educational success may have on altering mobility patterns. The role of the environment is modeled …

Contributors
Montalvo, Cesar Paul, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Mubayi, Anuj, et al.
Created Date
2020

While the literacy narrative genre has been studied in first-year composition and methods of teaching courses, investigations of the literacy narrative as a multimodal project for pre-service teachers (PSTs) of English Language Arts remain scarce. This research shares a qualitative classroom-based case study that focuses on a literacy narrative project, redesigned as a Multimodal Writing History Memoir (see Appendix 1), the first assignment in a required writing methods course in a teacher training program for English Language Arts (ELA) teachers at a large public university in the southwest. The study took place during the fall semester of 2019 with 15 …

Contributors
Hope, Kate, Early, Jessica, Saidy, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2020

This mixed methods action research study closely examines what Club Advisors need in order to be successful in their role, develops an intervention that supports Club Advisors in skill-building along with Club Advisor’s self-motivation and the development of self-efficacy in their role. The purpose of this study was to understand what skills and motivations Club Advisors had and after an intervention occurred, observing whether their self-efficacy around club advising increased. While there has been growth in the area of student affairs and focus on student involvement outside of the classroom, there is currently limited research in the field of university …

Contributors
O'Brien, Jennifer, Chen, Ying-Chih, Davis, Ben, et al.
Created Date
2020

Over a million children who attend American public schools experience homelessness every year. This study investigates the musical lives of children experiencing homelessness through the lens of the ecological systems theory (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). Children encounter music in a variety of ways and develop their own lexicon of meaning that depicts the relationships they have in, through, and around music. Relationship connections in this study were depicted through a system of relationship networks (Neal & Neal, 2013). In this study I present and analyze the cases of nine participants who attended an after-school care program at a homeless shelter for families …

Contributors
Box Mitchell, Corrie, Stauffer, Sandra L, Tobias, Evan, et al.
Created Date
2019

In 1976 Florynce R. Kennedy, a United States lawyer, activist, speaker, and author famously stated that “anybody with the brains and energy to become a teacher ought to want to become something better.” With these stigmas surrounding the teaching profession, it becomes a wonder that anybody decides to become a teacher, or even more difficult, stay in the profession. The state of Arizona, specifically, has reached landmark attrition rates and dissatisfaction surrounding lack of education funding. The stories of those leaving have been well publicized over the last year, but what about those who choose to stay? This dissertation examines …

Contributors
Luszeck, Amanda, Blasingame, James, Durand, Elizabeth S, et al.
Created Date
2019

This research introduces Roblocks, a user-friendly system for learning Artificial Intelligence (AI) planning concepts using mobile manipulator robots. It uses a visual programming interface based on block-structured programming to make AI planning concepts easier to grasp for those who are new to robotics and AI planning. Users get to accomplish any desired tasks by dynamically populating puzzle shaped blocks encoding the robot’s possible actions, allowing them to carry out tasks like navigation, planning, and manipulation by connecting blocks instead of writing code. Roblocks has two levels, where in the first level users are made to re-arrange a jumbled set of …

Contributors
Dave, Chirav, Srivastava, Siddharth, Hsiao, Ihan, et al.
Created Date
2019

Concert band classes have been part of the schooling landscape in Canada and the United States since the early 1900’s. Nevertheless, the context in which concert band classes have been offered recently has undergone a dramatic change. Typically, concert band classes have been offered as an elective course in schools, but more recently, concert band classes in some school settings have been required, especially at the beginning level. Because of the required band class context, it can no longer be assumed students in such band classes have the same music making goals exhibited by earlier generations of students. Persistence, resilience, …

Contributors
Mantie, Angela, Buss, Ray, Schmidt, Margaret, et al.
Created Date
2019

Computer science education is an increasingly vital area of study with various challenges that increase the difficulty level for new students resulting in higher attrition rates. As part of an effort to resolve this issue, a new visual programming language environment was developed for this research, the Visual IoT and Robotics Programming Language Environment (VIPLE). VIPLE is based on computational thinking and flowchart, which reduces the needs of memorization of detailed syntax in text-based programming languages. VIPLE has been used at Arizona State University (ASU) in multiple years and sections of FSE100 as well as in universities worldwide. Another major …

Contributors
De Luca, Gennaro, Chen, Yinong, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2020

This dissertation examines the first impressions that occur between Deaf consumers and American Sign Language (ASL)/English interpreters prior to a healthcare appointment. Negative first impressions can lead to a disconnect or loss of trust between Deaf consumers and interpreters and increase the risk for Deaf consumers to receive inadequate healthcare. The recognition of this risk led to an action research study to look at barriers to successful interactions between ASL/English interpreters and Deaf consumers. The mixed methods research design and associated research questions discovered factors and perceptions that contributed to the disconnect and subsequently informed a 10-week intervention with a …

Contributors
Covey von Pingel, Teddi Lynn, Bertrand, Melanie, Bernstein, Katie A, et al.
Created Date
2019

The focus of this research study was to better understand the development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) culture within an urban middle school campus and to analyze if the intervention, intended to develop a campus PLC culture, had any positive or negative impact on student achievement. This mixed-methods research study utilized pre and post surveys and interviews with campus educators to delve into the perceptions of the development of a PLC culture within the middle school campus. Furthermore, student academic performance was explored through the analysis of state academic performance reports. The first significant finding of this study was …

Contributors
Herrera, José Antonio, Gee, Elisabeth, Henriksen, Danah, et al.
Created Date
2019

This study utilized a Culturally Responsive Teaching training and bi-weekly collaboration sessions to improve the connectedness between teachers and their Latino male students. Three first-year teachers and 21 students participated in this study to learn how teaching practice and student classroom experiences changed as a result of the innovations. The findings showed teachers modified their planning and teaching and demonstrated more frequent culturally responsive teaching behaviors at the end of the implementation period. Participating students also showed increased classroom engagement and stronger relationships with their teachers, in addition to feeling more valued and included in the classroom. This study highlights …

Contributors
Thomas, Richard, Bernstein, Katie, Waite, Bryan, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this action research study was to implement and analyze an intervention designed to improve perceptions of working with others as well as practice and improve emotional tools related to such interactions through the systematic development of ability emotional intelligence (EI) related skills. The present study sought to: (1) explore high school students’ perceptions of their role as part of a team during teamwork; (1a) investigate how perceptions differed by EI level; (2) examine how students’ perceptions of their role in teamwork were influenced by being paired with more advanced (ability EI) peers or less advanced peers, based …

Contributors
Zuniga, Alison Kara, Bertrand, Melanie, Buss, Ray, et al.
Created Date
2019

Chi and Wylie’s (2014) Interactive Constructive Active Passive Framework (ICAP) was used as the foundation of a teacher led intervention using small group instruction with manipulatives during mathematics instruction to provide developmentally appropriate instruction to kindergarten students in a rigorous academic program. This action research mixed-methods study was conducted in a full-day self-contained kindergarten classroom to ascertain the effects of this mathematics instruction method on students’ levels of engagement and attitudes. Over the course of six months, twenty mathematics lessons were recorded to gather data for the study. Quantitative data included measuring time-on-task, teacher behaviors ICAP level, student behaviors ICAP …

Contributors
Miller, Jessica Ann, Rotheram-Fuller, Erin, Oakes, Wendy, et al.
Created Date
2019

As higher education embraces innovative educational models, support for the faculty members who must carry them out remains a vital ingredient for success. Despite this need, many institutions adopt innovations such as blended learning for all of the benefits afforded, with minimal consideration to meaningfully equip professors teaching these courses. “Faculty Learning Communities” (FLC’s) provide a powerful model of supporting and equipping faculty in their teaching practice. Nevertheless, ongoing and collaborative faculty development was historically unavailable to professors teaching undergraduate blended courses at Lancaster Bible College. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative action research study was to examine the ways …

Contributors
Harbin, Justin, Rotheram-Fuller, Erin, Foulger, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2019

Network analysis is a key conceptual orientation and analytical tool in the social sciences that emphasizes the embeddedness of individual behavior within a larger web of social relations. The network approach is used to better understand the cause and consequence of social interactions which cannot be treated as independent. The relational nature of network data and models, however, amplify the methodological concerns associated with inaccurate or missing data. This dissertation addresses such concerns via three projects. As a motivating substantive example, Project 1 examines factors associated with the selection of interaction partners by students at a large urban high school …

Contributors
Bates, Jordan Taylor, Maroulis, Spiro J, Kang, Yun, et al.
Created Date
2019

Learning analytics application is evolving into a student-facing solution. Student-facing learning analytics dashboards (SFLADs), as one popular application, occupies a pivotal position in online learning. However, the application of SFLADs faces challenges due to teacher-centered and researcher-centered approaches. The majority of SFLADs report student learning data to teachers, administrators, and researchers without direct student involvement in the design of SFLADs. The primary design criteria of SFLADs is developing interactive and user-friendly interfaces or sophisticated algorithms that analyze the collected data about students’ learning activities in various online environments. However, if students are not using these tools, then analytics about students …

Contributors
Li, Siyuan, Zuiker, Steven, Cunningham, James, et al.
Created Date
2019

In this study, the current literature regarding student engagement and student voice were reviewed to explore the connection between these two classroom elements. Currently, frequently incorporating student voice in order to increase student engagement most commonly takes place at the high school and university levels. Thus, utilizing Finn’s (1989) participation-identification theory, this study set out to implement a practical design intervention in an elementary classroom to increase student engagement through the incorporation of student voice. Using Design-Based Research, I implemented a collaborative reflection process which allowed students, teacher/researcher, and co-educators to provide feedback on classroom task and participant structures. The …

Contributors
Sanders, Elizabeth, Zuiker, Steven, Jordan, Michelle, et al.
Created Date
2019

The primary aim of this dissertation is to make a substantial contribution to the better understanding of the identity formations of Black Caribbean migrant women in Britain. The dissertation outlines a theory of Black female subject formation in Britain. This theory proposes that the process of subject formation in these women is an interrupted one. It further suggests that interruptions are likely to occur at four crucial points in the development of their identities. These four points are: 1) the immigrant identity; 2) the Caribbean identity; 3) “the Jamaican” identity; and 4) the Black British identity. In order to understand …

Contributors
John, Anique Terri, Swadener, Elizabeth B, Henry, Paget, et al.
Created Date
2019

This study aims to gain an understanding of higher education interventions taking place in refugee camps around the world that implement hybrid online and on-site models. Through an archival, database study, this uncovers the most salient characteristics of 8 international interventions (Australian Catholic University, Borderless Higher Education for Refugees, Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, InZone, Kepler, Mosaik, Global Border Studies, and Education for Humanity) in regard to logistics, academics, technology, and pedagogy. The study found multiple ways in which these programs seek to increase inclusion and success of refugee learners. These techniques include (1) free tuition, (2) …

Contributors
Abuwandi, Sarah, Swadener, Elizabeth, Broberg, Gregory, et al.
Created Date
2019

This research works from in an institutional ethnographic methodology. From this grounded approach, it describes the dialectic between the individual and the discourse of the institution. This work develops a complex picture of the multifarious ways in which institutional discourse has real effects on the working lives of graduate teaching associates (GTAs) and administrative staff and faculty in Arizona State University's Department of English. Beginning with the experiences of individuals as they described in their interviews, provided an opportunity to understand individual experiences connected by threads of institutional discourse. The line of argumentation that developed from this grounded institutional ethnographic …

Contributors
Oakley, Abigail, Goggin, Maureen, Gee, Elisabeth, et al.
Created Date
2019

This mixed-methods study explored perceptions of new adjuncts on various trainings with regards to satisfying their professional and aspirational needs. Three trainings were offered in fall 2018 quarter as optional professional development: workshop, and two roundtable sessions. These trainings assisted adjuncts with their teaching skills, educational technology and pedagogy. Guidance was provided from experienced adjuncts and staff. Surveys and interviews with adjuncts, along with a focus group with staff were the sources of data for this study. A repeated measures Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) model was utilized. Analysis of data showed that there was a positive and statistical significance of …

Contributors
Sreekaram, Siddhartha, Marsh, Josephine, Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey, et al.
Created Date
2019

There has been growing interest among learning scientists in the design and study of out-of-school time (OST) learning environments to support equitable development of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) interests among youth from groups that are underrepresented in STEM fields. Most of these design studies assumed the youth came to the learning environments without well-developed STEM interests. I challenged this assumption by enacting a social design participatory study to engage youth (aged 11 to 14), from groups that are underrepresented in STEM fields, as partners in designing an OST networked club to support the youth in growing their own …

Contributors
Gould, Deena Lee, Barab, Sasha, Gee, Elisabeth, et al.
Created Date
2019

Feedback represents a vital component of the learning process and is especially important for Computer Science students. With class sizes that are often large, it can be challenging to provide individualized feedback to students. Consistent, constructive, supportive feedback through a tutoring companion can scaffold the learning process for students. This work contributes to the construction of a tutoring companion designed to provide this feedback to students. It aims to bridge the gap between the messages the compiler delivers, and the support required for a novice student to understand the problem and fix their code. Particularly, it provides support for students …

Contributors
Day, Melissa, Gonzalez-Sanchez, Javier, Bansal, Ajay, et al.
Created Date
2019

Throughout the field of corrections in the United States, the prevalent question in regard to reentry preparation of offenders is, “what works?” With a renewed focus on providing meaningful program opportunities for offenders that enable real and sustained changes for reentry success, which has been partially driven by overcrowded prison systems and soaring corrections budgets, the quest has been energized for program models with results that are empirically based. As part of this quest, the Rand Corporation in 2014 (Davis, et al., 2014) published a comprehensive review of correctional education programs based on a meta-analysis of past studies and reported …

Contributors
Fizer, Gregory A., Gee, Elisabeth, Metcalf, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2019

Given the profound influence that schools have on students’ genders and the existing scholarly research in the field of education studies which draws clear implications between practices of schooling and sanctioning and promoting particular gender subjectivities, often in alignment with traditional norms, I conduct a critical ethnography to examine the practices of gender in one eighth grade English language arts (ELA) classroom at an arts-missioned charter school. I do this to explore how ELA instruction at an arts charter school may provide opportunities for students to do gender differently. To guide this dissertation theoretically, I rely on the process philosophy …

Contributors
Sweet, Joseph David, Carlson, David Lee, Blasingame, James, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this action research study was to examine how membership within a virtual community of practice impacted individual professional development, knowledge exchange practices, and self-efficacy. The G-3/5/7 virtual community of practice (VCoP) website was created to provide members with access to a wide range of career-related content, while also bestowing them with the level of volition needed to be completely in control of when and how they consume content. Feedback from early cycles of research suggested the pilot version of the VCoP wasn’t perceived as user-friendly and didn’t provide a broad range of professional development-related content. Thus, the …

Contributors
Roy, Brennan M., Marsh, Josephine, Bankus, Tammy, et al.
Created Date
2019

Institutions of higher learning can be centers of meaning-making and learning and are expected to play a pivotal role in a global shift toward sustainability. Despite recent innovations, much sustainability education today is still delivered using traditional pedagogies common across higher education. Therefore, students and facilitators should continue innovating along pedagogical themes consistent with the goals of sustainability: transformation and emancipation. Yet, more clarity is needed about pedagogical approaches that will transform and emancipate students, allowing them to become innovators that change existing structures and systems. My dissertation attempts to address this need using three approaches. First, I present a …

Contributors
Papenfuss, Jason, Merritt, Eileen, Manuel-Navarrete, David, et al.
Created Date
2019

Traditionally when the topic of secondary traumatic stress (STS) is discussed, it is often in regard to medical professionals and first responders. People who have STS or compassion fatigue, as it has been renamed, have been defined as people who are dealing with traumatic stress and/or emotional burdens via their “patients.” This study, conducted at a major university in the southwest, measured educators’ perceptions of the extent of their compassion fatigue using the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL) before and after a voluntary online support training during last four weeks of the semester. Educators who were full time scored …

Contributors
Lank, Shannon, Puckett, Kathleen, Shaw, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this study was to research the effects of a student-staff mentoring relationship on high school students’ locus of control, life/school satisfaction and ultimately their academics as determined by their grades. Participants consisted of a small cohort of 10th grade high school students at a public charter, college preparatory high school in inner city Phoenix, Arizona. Frederickson’s broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions and Bandura’s social cognitive theory provide the models of behavior to improve school satisfaction, motivation and overall well being. A mixed method, action research design was used to study how a 9-week mentoring program facilitated by …

Contributors
Alvarado Hernandez, Ruby Rebecca, Ott, Molly, Hartley, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2019

This quasi-experimental, concurrent, mixed method, action research study sought to evaluate how an elective 1-credit course informed by mindfulness and culturally sustaining pedagogy influenced honors students’ academic self-efficacy, self-compassion, and their meaning-making about what it means to be an honors student. Theoretical perspectives and research guiding the study included: academic self-efficacy, culturally sustaining pedagogy, mindfulness, and third space. Drawing from these perspectives, the 9-week Creative Compassion course utilized poetry and rap as a way to enact culturally sustaining pedagogy and also as a vehicle for students to practice mindfulness. Findings from quantitative data from pre- and post- surveys of a …

Contributors
Billbe, Sasha, McArthur Harris, Lauren, Golden, Amy, et al.
Created Date
2019

The advancement of technology has transformed information consumption into an accessible and flexible process. The open learning ecosystem that exists online relies on self-direction. Learners are able to effectively fulfill personal learning goals with preferred content forms, specifically by utilizing Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). It is essential to investigate the role of mediums in distributed learning to initiate human-centric design changes that best support the learner. This study provides insight into how choice influences self-learning and highlights the major engagement difficulties of MOOCs. Significant attrition was experienced while issuing text and audio material to participants for three weeks. Although …

Contributors
Woods, Quintin, Roscoe, Rod, Craig, Scotty, et al.
Created Date
2019

Nursing school can be challenging for undergraduate students, largely because they do not know what to expect in terms of the demands of the rigorous academic program. Students who enter the program with unrealistic expectations of the demands, such as underestimated time needed for studying for exams or preparing for clinical and class time, as well as the emotional toll of time away from family and friends are often challenged with being adequately prepared for the day-to-day experience of nursing school. Once students have been in the program a few semesters, they begin to get the flow of the expectation …

Contributors
Bednarek, Salina, Puckett, Kathleen, Albert, Louis, et al.
Created Date
2019

ABSTRACT Over the past decades, there has been growth in student academic success programs in institutions of higher learning. However, with this growth instructors in these programs have not always been prepared to teach courses focused on supporting student academic success. The purpose of this study was to understand the role that mentoring plays in the performance of new faculty in the Success Courses department at Arizona State University. The guiding questions of the study examined the degree to which mentoring affected instructors’ efficacy in implementing the core tenets of the Success Courses Department and the features of the mentoring …

Contributors
Atkins, Allison, McArthur Harris, Lauren, Rhoden, Stuart, et al.
Created Date
2019

This action research study primarily examined how educative curriculum materials (i.e., curriculum materials that include supports for teacher learning) can improve a teacher’s knowledge base and ability to succeed in the classroom. The focus was on the impact of one type of educative curriculum material: PowerPoint presentations. Specifically, the study investigated if translating teacher’s manuals into digital presentations was valued by general education teachers responsible for teaching Engage NY math in kindergarten, first, second, and third grades. The study asked teacher participants to describe the impact (if any) of adding a digital presentation component to their lessons and investigated if …

Contributors
Freauff, Rebecca, Ott, Molly, Ceceña, Araceli, et al.
Created Date
2019

This mixed methods study explores the work of five small writing communities formed within a university-based preservice English language arts writing methods course. Fifteen preservice English language arts teachers took part in the study and participated across five peer writing groups. The study shares the instructional design of the course as well as the writing activities and practices that took place within the groups over the course of one 15-week semester. The study draws on Wenger’s (1998, 2009) theory of communities of practice as well as activity theory (Engeström,1999, 2001; Russell, 1997) to understand the social supports, practices, and learning …

Contributors
Alford, Katie, Singer-Early, Jessica, Whitney, Anne, et al.
Created Date
2019

There has been a growing emphasis on the education of future generations of engineers who will have to tackle complex, global issues that are sociotechnical in nature. The National Science Foundation invests millions of dollars in interdisciplinary engineering education research (EER) to create an innovative and inclusive culture aimed at radical change in the engineering education system. This exploratory research sought to better understand ways of thinking to address complex educational challenges, specifically, in the context of engineering-social sciences collaborations. The mixed methods inquiry drew on the ways of thinking perspectives from sustainability education to adapt futures, values, systems, and …

Contributors
Dalal, Medha, Archambault, Leanna M, Carberry, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this study was to trouble existing conceptions of disability that ground music education literature and practice. I sought plausible insights into how disability is experienced in, through, and/or around music by participants who are disabled persons/persons with disabilities (DP/PwD). Insights gained might allow readers to complexify and trouble taken-for-granted assumptions about disability. Questions included: (a) How do participants experience disability in, through, and around music? (b) What plausible insights related to disability can be gained by attending to participants’ experiences of disability in, through, and around music? (c) What plausible insights related to inclusion can be gained …

Contributors
Rathgeber, Jesse, Stauffer, Sandra L, Mantie, Roger, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how collaborative language learning activities affected student perceptions of their engagement and language self-efficacy in a communicative, flipped language learning classroom in higher education. The new online platforms accompanying many textbooks now allow students to prepare for classes ahead of time, allowing instructors to use more class time for student engagement in actual language practices. However, there has been little investigation of the effects of this communicative, flipped classroom model on students’ learning processes and outcomes. This mixed methods action research study revealed that the introduction of varied …

Contributors
Rama, Rashmi, Gee, Elisabeth, Buss, Ray R., et al.
Created Date
2019

There is a national shortage of highly qualified early childhood educators. For many early childhood educators, this career path begins with the Child Development Associate credential. Community colleges are well-positioned to award this credential and address the shortage of highly qualified early childhood educators. However, many students arrive at community colleges academically unprepared, with excessive work and family responsibilities. The purpose of my participatory action research study is to explore the impact of internships on early childhood education student attitudes towards persistence in their course of study. This study has the potential to impact strategies used with child development majors …

Contributors
Deibert, Deborah, Marsh, Josephine, Geiselhofer, Melissa, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of the Inclusive Instruction Program (IIP) action research study was to explore the potential relationship between a new professional development cluster and general education teacher self-efficacy in supporting students with special needs. The IIP was designed to address teacher areas of needs as identified in a prior cycle of action research. During the needs assessment cycle, teachers suggested that they needed help with differentiation, behavior management, collaboration, and progress monitoring. As a result of this information, the IIP study workshops were developed around these topics. The study was grounded in a constructivist framework with aspects of self-efficacy and …

Contributors
Ochonogor, Emerald, McArthur Harris, Lauren, Rotheram-Fuller, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a mentoring program on self-efficacy beliefs. High-risk undergraduate students at Arizona State University majoring in Public Health and other closely-related fields represent this study’s sample. Bandura’s Self-Efficacy Theory guides this study’s theoretical framework. This study used a mixed method, action research design. Participants took a pre-test that measures their self-efficacy and registered the barriers to their academic success; following that, they enrolled and participated in a mentoring program. Upon completion of the program, they completed a post-test to evaluate any changes to their perspectives. Non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were …

Contributors
Savaglio, Lauren Nicole, Ott, Molly, Hrncir, Shawn, et al.
Created Date
2019

Abstract On a daily basis I am bombarded with images in every walk of life. I encounter images crossing my path constantly through media such as the internet, television, magazines, radio, social media, even in the grocery store line on screens intended to capture our attention. As I drive down the roadways, I am invaded by images that at times can be distracting with their dazzling displays, attempting to get our attention and get us to consume their product or service or understand a historical meaning. In this dissertation I intend on looking at murals and two social studies textbooks …

Contributors
Gonzales, Darlene Michelle, Margolis, Eric, Ovando, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2018

One of the ideals underpinning public education in the United has been that of educating young people to become engaged democratic citizens. Civics courses have been the main, and sometimes only, sign of public schools attending to their civic mission. An opportunity to offer citizenship education through the experience of democratic governance manifests itself through the implementation of school participatory budgeting. Though promising, the use of school participatory budgeting in the United States is relatively new. The literature is sparse and issues of process design as well as research methodology remain unexplored. School participatory budgeting has the potential, at least, …

Contributors
Brown, Andrew Boyd Keefer, Schugurensky, Daniel, Barone, Thomas E, et al.
Created Date
2018

International schools and international education initiatives are experiencing tremendous growth as the world’s economy continues to globalize. International schools operating outside of the traditional boundaries of state and national contexts have become havens noted for their diverse and multicultural staff, student bodies and school communities. However, the challenges facing international education have only recently begun to be studied independent from their traditional teaching counterparts. International schools, and any study associated with them, require an individual approach for identifying and solving the challenges unique to their context. “I’m Leaving!” is an action research study which incorporates phenomenological hermeneutics, action research, and …

Contributors
Dieterle, Bret Steven, Henriksen, Danah, Cocchiarella, Martha, et al.
Created Date
2018

This study examined discussion forum posts within a website dedicated to a medium and genre of music (chiptunes) with potential for music-centered making, a phrase I use to describe maker culture practices that revolve around music-related purposes. Three research questions guided this study: (1) What chiptune-related practices did members of chipmusic.org discuss between December 30th, 2009 and November 13th, 2017? (2) What do chipmusic.org discussion forum posts reveal about the multidisciplinary aspects of chiptunes? (3) What import might music-centered making evident within chipmusic.org discussion forum posts hold for music education? To address these research questions, I engaged in corpus-assisted discourse …

Contributors
O'Leary, Jared Duane, Mantie, Roger A, Tobias, Evan S, et al.
Created Date
2018

The discipline of continuing professional development (CPD) is well defined and established within a variety of industries, such as medical, legal, and financial. The built environment is a less defined and mature industry with respect to educational pathways and professional education, with no uniform structure. Occupational licensing, such as registered nurses, certified professional accountants, and others are well known within both their industries and the public. Additionally, occupational core-competencies are well established. Planning is a core skill set within the built environment and construction management. Definitions of the term “planning” vary quite broadly across the built environment, but generally includes …

Contributors
Hurtado, Kristen Caroline, Sullivan, Kenneth, Wiezel, Avi, et al.
Created Date
2018

Machine learning tutorials often employ an application and runtime specific solution for a given problem in which users are expected to have a broad understanding of data analysis and software programming. This thesis focuses on designing and implementing a new, hands-on approach to teaching machine learning by streamlining the process of generating Inertial Movement Unit (IMU) data from multirotor flight sessions, training a linear classifier, and applying said classifier to solve Multi-rotor Activity Recognition (MAR) problems in an online lab setting. MAR labs leverage cloud computing and data storage technologies to host a versatile environment capable of logging, orchestrating, and …

Contributors
De La Rosa, Matthew Lee, Chen, Yinong, Collofello, James, et al.
Created Date
2018

This mixed methods study examined whether participation in a virtual community of practice (vCoP) could impact the implementation of new skills learned in a professional development session and help to close the research to implementation gap. Six participants attended a common professional development session and completed pre- , mid- , and post-intervention surveys regarding their implementation of social emotional teaching strategies as well as face-to-face interviews. Both quantitative and qualitative data was examined to determine if participation in the vCoP impacted implementation of skills learned in the PD session. Quantitative data was inconclusive but qualitative data showed an appreciation for …

Contributors
Lopez, Ariana Colleen, Dorn, Sherman, Gray, Shelley, et al.
Created Date
2018

Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are university-sanctioned initiatives for students in recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction. Given the ever-rising rates of alcohol and opioid use and misuse, a great need exists to understand how to provide support for those who are considering recovery or who choose a recovery lifestyle in college. The purpose of this action research study was to examine peer-to-peer support for students in recovery. The development of two training innovations, Recovery 101 and Recovery Ally, were delivered to health and wellness peer educators called the Well Devil Ambassadors (WDAs) with the goal of equipping them to …

Contributors
Gueci, Veronika (Nika), Henriksen, Danah, Moses, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2018

This study examined the influence of perceived transfer of learning on student engagement, completion rates, and attendance hours of high school equivalency (HSE) students within a Wicked Problems Framework. Local research had shown that over 30% of HSE students stopped attending HSE classes prior to completing 40 instructional hours, and many students cited a lack of relevant, “real-world” application, and the need to pursue employment as the two most common reasons that they stopped attending. To address this issue, an innovation was developed and deployed for one semester at the Rio Salado College Avondale location. The innovation identified the individual …

Contributors
PEREIRA, GREG, Henriksen, Danah, Gee, Betty, et al.
Created Date
2018

New teachers quit the profession at high levels, particularly in rural and urban schools. These high rates of turnover create staffing issues, particularly in high-needs areas like math and special education. High levels of stress and dissatisfaction with the profession have been cited as common reasons teachers exit the profession within the first few years. However, positive interventions from the field of positive psychology as well as mindfulness have been used in the workplace and have been found to support increasing wellbeing as well as reducing stress. This study defines workplace wellbeing as a construct of positive emotions, engagement, positive …

Contributors
Hallquist, Rachel Anne, Henriksen, Danah, Frias, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2018

The current study investigated the task of coloring static images with multimedia learning to determine the impact on retention and transfer scores. After watching a multimedia video on the formation of lightning participants were assigned to either a passive, active, or constructive condition based on the ICAP Framework. Participants colored static images on key concepts from the video, passive condition observed the images, active condition colored the images by applying the concepts, and the constructive condition colored the images by generating new ideas and concepts. The study did not support the hypothesis that the constructive condition would have increased retention …

Contributors
Williams, Jennifer S, Craig, Scotty D, Roscoe, Rod, et al.
Created Date
2018

ABSTRACT Closing the achievement gap between low-income, marginalized, racially, and linguistically diverse students has proven difficult. Research has outlined the effects of funding on student achievement in a manner that focuses the attention on dollars expended, in order overcome barriers to learning. Arizona has long been recognized for its education funding disparity, and its inability to balance fiscal capacity in a manner that serves to improve educational outcomes. This dissertation examines how Arizona funds its education system. It measures horizontal inequity in a robust manner by examining those fiscal capacity resources directly related to learning and poverty. Recognizing districts with …

Contributors
Martinez, David G., Pivovarova, Margarita, Berliner, David C, et al.
Created Date
2018

In the real world outside of schools, contemporary students are routinely reading, writing, communicating, acting, and learning internationally, translingually, and multimodally, thanks to the prevalence of digital online communication; this has taken place across students’ racial, ethnic, and linguistic identities and national affiliations. Today, the global online contexts are considered as one of essential literacy environments, and the globally networked online contexts might become a main stage of future literacy practices. In this sense, this study develops new three theories about literacies studies from the perspective of the New Literacy Studies in an increasingly digitalized and globalized contemporary world. To …

Contributors
Lee, Kewman M., Gee, James Paul, Serafini, Frank, et al.
Created Date
2018

Among researchers, educators, and other stakeholders in literacy education, there has been a growing emphasis on developing literacy pedagogies that are more responsive to the ways young people experience literacy in their everyday lives, which often make use of digital media and other technologies for exchanging meaning. This dissertation project sought to explore the nature of these digital-age literacies in the context of children learning through and about new technologies. Conducting a year-long, multimethod observational study of an out-of-school library-based program designed to engage students in self-directed learning around the domain of computer programming, this project was framed around an …

Contributors
Aguilera, Earl, GEE, ELISABETH R, GEE, JAMES P, et al.
Created Date
2018

As interest in making and STEM learning through making and tinkering continue to rise, understanding the nature, process, and benefits of learning STEM through making have become important topics for research. In addition to understanding the basics of learning through making and tinkering, we need to understand these activities, examine their potential benefits, and find out ways to facilitate such learning experiences for all learners with resources that are readily available. This dissertation is a study of children’s learning while tinkering inspired by the Educational Maker Movement. It is motivated by the projects that children playfully create with broken toys, …

Contributors
Parekh, Priyanka, Gee, Elisabeth R, Zuiker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2018

This multilevel, institutional case study used ethnographic methods to explore the intersections of local language policies and emergent bilingual students’ identities in dual language and structured English immersion (SEI) classrooms at one urban elementary school. Using a sociocultural policy approach as means to explore the ways that educational language policies are appropriated and practiced in schools and classrooms and an intersectional literacy identity framework, I engaged in a multilevel qualitative analysis of one school, two fifth-grade classrooms, and four focal emergent bilingual students. At the school and classroom levels, I sought to understand the ways educators practiced and enacted language …

Contributors
Baca, Evelyn Concepcion, Jimenez-Silva, Margarita, Artiles, Alfredo, et al.
Created Date
2018

In college, students are continuously learning and maturing, prompting transitions, as they grow to enhance their academic, vocational, and personal development. As such, institutions of higher education must also consider how to support students in these transitions. At the Teachers College at Southwestern University, 59% (N=86) of students in Educational Studies, a non-certification major, transitioned from teacher certification majors. In an ecology that centralizes students pursuing teacher certification, students majoring in Educational Studies do not receive the adequate support, particularly in addressing their concerns and curiosities regarding their future career trajectories. This qualitative study drew on Bronfenbrenner’s ecological models of …

Contributors
Fong, Raquel, Liou, Daniel Dinn-You, Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka, et al.
Created Date
2018

Research shows that teachers hold different expectations for different students and these varying expectations influence students’ academic performance (Good & Brophy, 1997; Jussim, Smith, Madon, & Palumbo, 1998; Rubie-Davies, 2007; Rubie-Davies, Hattie, Townsend, & Hamilton, 2007). Teachers form expectations of students based on personal beliefs about individuals’ capabilities (Rubie-Davies, 2015). Teachers’ differential expectations for students can have positive and negative influences on student learning opportunities and their future potential (Weinstein, 2002). The purpose of this action research study was to better understand if gifted second-graders perceive their teachers’ expectations and if there is a difference in their academic performance or …

Contributors
Zichichi, Tara Marie, Dinn-You Liou, Daniel, Lansdowne, Kimberly, et al.
Created Date
2018

Criticisms of technocratic and managerial sustainability responses to global environmental change have led scholars to argue for transformative shifts in ideology, policy, and practice favoring alternative, plural transformation pathways to sustainability. This raises key debates around how we build transformative capacity and who will lead the way. To further this critical dialogue, this dissertation explores the potential for sustainability experiential learning (SEL) to serve as a capacity building mechanism for global ecological citizenship in support of transformation pathways to sustainable wellbeing. In the process it considers how the next generation of those primed for sustainability leadership identify with and negotiate …

Contributors
Gwiszcz, Julianna Marie, Eder, James, Haglund, LaDawn, et al.
Created Date
2018

This dissertation explored the literacy practices that developed around comics when two secondary teachers (one AP Science and one AP English) used comics in their classroom instruction for the first time. It also explored the ways the teachers and their students positioned comics within their specific classroom contexts. Historically, comics are a marginalized medium in educational circles—widely considered non-academic despite the recognition by scholars for their sophistication as a multimodal medium. Scholars, librarians, teachers, and comics authors have made the case for the inclusion of comics in educational contexts citing their ability to support the literacy development of struggling readers, …

Contributors
Kachorsky, Danielle, Serafini, Frank, Gee, Elisabeth, et al.
Created Date
2018

Arguing for the importance of decolonial pedagogy in human rights education, this research is located at the intersection of human rights education, pedagogy, and justice studies, and is situated in the context of a contested neoliberal university in order to learn about and understand some of the challenges in implementing pedagogical change inspired by decolonial theory. This research focuses on pedagogical approaches of human rights professors to understand how and to what extent they are aligned with and informed by, incorporate, or utilize decolonial theory. This is accomplished through a content analysis of their syllabi, including readings and pedagogical statements, …

Contributors
Aldawood, Danielle, Gómez, Alan, Simmons, William, et al.
Created Date
2018

This mixed methods action research project focused on improving external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. More specifically, this project explored how and to what extent an intervention of a professional development model influenced external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences and how the intervention influenced external evaluators’ perception of effectiveness when providing feedback during pre- and post- evaluation conferences. Self-efficacy theory, sociocultural theory, and the community of practice framework informed the intervention. Six external teacher evaluators participated in the study from July through December of 2017. The professional development …

Contributors
Buchanan, Jennifer, Hodges Kulinna, Pamela, Jordan, Michelle E, et al.
Created Date
2018

ABSTRACT It is critical for students to be provided with opportunities to learn in settings that foster their academic growth. It is equally important that schools endeavor to be a place where students’ social and emotional needs are met as well. However, due to lack of funding, over-testing, inappropriate evaluation measures, and other persistent policy pressures, our public schools have often resorted to a focus on raising standardized test scores through direct instruction with an increasingly narrowed curriculum. As a result, schools have often become places in which students, rather than being seen as valued future members of a productive …

Contributors
Ohanian, Jennifer, Hermanns, Carl, Jordan, Michelle, et al.
Created Date
2018

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was two-fold. In Specific Aim One, we examined the associations between education level, personal trainer credentials and characteristics, and knowledge of exercise science and personal training principles. In Specific Aim Two we examined associations between education, personal trainer credentials and knowledge of personal trainers with client retention. This study utilized a cross-sectional research design. An anonymous electronic survey was used to collect the data. Eligible participants (N=226) were individuals who were providing one-on-one personal training services for at least one client. All data were assessed for normality prior to data analysis. Descriptive statistics were …

Contributors
Preston, John, Der Ananian, Cheryl, Berger, Christopher G, et al.
Created Date
2018

This research examines the communicative processes of resilience in the organizational context of public education. The research utilizes one-on-one interviews to elicit descriptions of resilience and well-being and collect stories of success and overcoming challenges. The study purpose is two-fold: (1) to understand the ways in which organizational members construct and enact resilience individually and collectively through their talk and stories, and (2) to extend the communication theory of resilience through an empirical investigation of resilience in an organizational context. An iterative, thematic analysis of interview data revealed that resilience, as lived, is a socially constructed, collective process. Findings show …

Contributors
Kamrath, Jessica K, Tracy, Sarah J., Adame, Elissa A., et al.
Created Date
2018

The Imagination + Imagery model for design pedagogy is presented. Two studies were conducted to develop the model: (a) the visual imagery assessment of design students; and (b) a historical research on the concept of imagination. Results suggest the following implications as the components of strong imagination for design thinkers: (a) the ability to shape vivid images of objects in mind; (b) the ability to mentally transform the spatial representations of images; (c) to consider the ethical consequences of imagined situation; (d) to use imagination for resolving design wicked problems; and (e) to actively imagine for mental and emotional health. …

Contributors
Hedayati, Farzaneh, Takamura, John, Lerman, Liz, et al.
Created Date
2018

Much research has been conducted regarding the current state of public education within the United States. Very little of that research bodes well for the system’s current circumstances or for the direction our system is headed. The debate stems around two opposing ideologies. One believes that there needs to be more accountability via high-stakes testing and the continuum of the status quo that the country has maintained for centuries, regardless of the effect it may be having on the students’ well-being. While the opposing view sees high-stakes testing as a contributing factor to the seemingly unproductive, chaotic, and even harmful …

Contributors
Khaleesi, Casey, Swadener, Elizabeth, Bertrand, Melanie, et al.
Created Date
2018

Art museums are institutions with a mission to not only preserve art and culture for the public, but to provide visitors with an educational experience. This qualitative case study includes three art museums in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area: a university art museum, a large public museum in Downtown Phoenix, and a contemporary art museum in the city of Scottsdale. This research study sought to identify the ways in which eight art museum employees from the education and administration departments identify their institutions as educational. Data was collected and analyzed through the methods of direct observations and field notes, one-on-one interviews, …

Contributors
Lechner, Nicole Ashley, Young, Bernard, Stokrocki, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2018

This paper addresses a local problem of practice at Arizona State University regarding the support for potentially underprepared students. The overarching goal of this study was to better understand the role rapport plays in student achievement. This study examines how the LEAD Project (Learn, Explore, Advance, Design), in particular student relationships with instructors and their peers, may or may not influence student achievement. LEAD students complete three courses as a group – Introduction to Human Communication (COM 100), Critical Reading and Thinking (UNI 110), and The LEAD Project (ASU 150). The innovation was designed to give students the opportunity to …

Contributors
Vawter, Katherine, Kulinna, Pamela, Buss, Ray, et al.
Created Date
2018

Artists and designers are preparing for rapidly changing and competitive careers in creative fields that require a healthy dose of resiliency to persevere. However, little is known on how students within these fields become more self-efficacious, gritty, situated toward a growth mindset, and persistent over time. This mixed-method action research study investigates how undergraduate arts and design college students approach and navigate perceptions of failure as well as incorporates an intervention course designed to increase their self-efficacy, growth mindset, and academic persistence. Participants were eighteen arts and design students representing a variety of disciplines from an eight-week, one-unit, 300-level course …

Contributors
Workmon Larsen, Megan, Kulinna, Pamela, Henriksen, Danah, et al.
Created Date
2018

More Math Minutes is an action research study, set in a high school in the southwestern United States, designed to examine the effects of collaborative peer-group learning for low-performing Algebra I and low-performing Algebra II students. This study is grounded in Social Cognitive Theory and Constructivist Theory including Bandura’s self-efficacy theory and Vygotsky’s theory of proximal development. Participants are comprised of 20 low-performing Algebra I students as the peer-learners and 20 low-performing Algebra II students as the peer-teachers participating in a peer tutoring intervention. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected through pre- and post-self-efficacy questionnaires, pre- and post-mathematics knowledge assessments, …

Contributors
Herriman, Patricia Valles, Kulinna, Pamela, Marsh, Josephine, et al.
Created Date
2018

The problem under investigation was to determine if a specific outline-style learning guide, called a Learning Agenda (LA), can improve a college algebra learning environment and if learner control can reduce the cognitive effort associated with note-taking in this instance. The 192 participants were volunteers from 47 different college algebra and pre-calculus classes at a community college in the southwestern United States. The approximate demographics of this college as of the academic year 2016 – 2017 are as follows: 53% women, 47% men; 61% ages 24 and under, 39% 25 and over; 43% Hispanic/Latino, 40% White, 7% other. Participants listened …

Contributors
Tarr, Julie Charlotte, Nelson, Brian, Atkinson, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2018

To develop critical reasoning skills potentially advances students' ability to critically consume information, make informed decisions, and actively participate in a democracy. An inquiry-based pedagogical approach to science teaching remains an effective means to develop critical reasoning skills. Participating in scientific inquiry requires students to generate arguments and test alternative hypotheses using experimental evidence. Scientific inquiry demands that students use their critical reasoning skills. Unfortunately, many teachers fail to allocate an adequate amount of time for genuine experimentation in science classes. As a result, science classes often leave students unprepared to think critically and apply their knowledge in a practical …

Contributors
Blechacz, Sarah, Hermanns, Carl, Judson, Eugene, et al.
Created Date
2018

Evolution is the foundation of biology, yet it remains controversial even among college biology students. Acceptance of evolution is important for students if we want them to incorporate evolution into their scientific thinking. However, students’ religious beliefs are a consistent barrier to their acceptance of evolution due to a perceived conflict between religion and evolution. Using pre-post instructional surveys of students in introductory college biology, Study 1 establishes instructional strategies that can be effective for reducing students' perceived conflict between religion and evolution. Through interviews and qualitative analyses, Study 2 documents how instructors teaching evolution at public universities may be …

Contributors
Barnes, Maryann, Brownell, Sara, Nesse, Randolph, et al.
Created Date
2018

The role of an art educator is characteristically dualistic and paradoxical. Not only are most art educators trained as artists, but they also receive instruction on theories and practices used in art education. The purpose of the study was to examine how community college ceramic instructors identify themselves within their dual roles as teacher-artists. I studied if and how the teacher-artist places emphasis on one position over the other, or how they successfully synthesized these positions. I also investigated the phenomenon by considering the why, how and which role they accentuated, as well as it affects and influences on their …

Contributors
Keele, Teresa, Young, Bernard, Stokrocki, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2018

This dissertation shares the results of a study of the community of the mobile augmented reality game Pokémon Go. It also serves to build on and expand the framework of Distributed Teaching and Learning (DTALS), which here is used as a framework through which to explore the game’s community (Gee & Gee, 2016; Holmes, Tran, & Gee, 2017). DTALS serves to expand on other models which examine learning in out-of-school contexts, and in particular on the connections between classroom and out-of-school learning, which numerous scholars argue is of critical importance (Sefton-Green, 2004; Vadeboncoeur, Kady-Rachid, & Moghtader, 2014). This framework serves …

Contributors
Tran, Kelly Michaela, Gee, Elisabeth R, Gee, James P, et al.
Created Date
2018

This research features a phenomenological investigation of the interactions between adolescent storytellers and audience members during a live storytelling event. The researcher partnered with an English teacher in an urban Southwest high school and a spoken word poet from a youth nonprofit to produce a storytelling workshop and corresponding story slam event for high school students. Fourteen participants, including seven student storytellers and seven student audience members, participated in extensive follow-up interviews where they described the experience of their respective roles during the event. Utilizing a phenomenological design (Moustakas, 1994; Vagle, 2014) and drawing from reception theory (Bennett, 1997; Hall, …

Contributors
Griffith, Jason J., Blasingame, James, Graham, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2018

Using an adapted Straussian Grounded Theory approach, and as a participant observer, data from members of a Facebook group made up of parents and caretakers of infants or children with Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) were collected and analyzed. During the first exploratory phase, 31 semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 theoretically sampled members of the group. During the second phase, 604 postings (original and comments) created by members of the online social media group, for one week, were analyzed. The study explored various dimensions of informal learning in this space. These included what learning strategies members used, what types …

Contributors
Vargas Wright, Jenny, Savenye, Wilhelmina C., Archambault, Leanna, et al.
Created Date
2018

Guided by cognitive, socio-cognitive, and socio-cultural learning theories, large-scale studies over multiple semesters, multiple instructors and at two different institutions have been performed in order to understand the factors that contribute to student performance in general organic chemistry. Students’ cognitive abilities were assessed in a new way based on a categorization of problem types in a standard organic chemistry curriculum. Problem types that required higher cognitive load were found to be more predictive of overall course performance. However, student performance on high cognitive load problems was different when compared in terms of non-cognitive factors, e.g. whether they were pre-health students …

Contributors
Austin, Ara, Gould, Ian R., Atkinson, Robert K., et al.
Created Date
2018

This is a genealogical study of the taken-for-granted ‘free’ or ‘self-governed’ play practice at the free schools. The study places play practice within a historical trajectory. The study compares and analyzes the current (1960s to present) discursive formations of play practice as they emerge in various archival texts such as on free schools, and juvenile delinquency and youth crime, to the discursive formations of the 1890s to 1929s as they emerge in various archival texts such as on physical education, public bath, city problems, playground, outdoor recreation legislation, and recreation areas and juvenile delinquency. The study demonstrates how various “subjugated …

Contributors
Aletheiani, Dinny Risri, Carlson, David L, Sandlin, Jennifer A, et al.
Created Date
2017

Educators often struggle to effectively engage all students. Part of the reason for this is adherence to behavioral principles which curtail student autonomy and diminish student self-efficacy. Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) can counter this problem; it was designed to increase autonomy for minority youth in urban high schools. I conducted a study to add to the growing conversation about YPAR in settings beyond urban high schools and to look at how YPAR can influence students’ self-efficacy. Drawing on results from surveys, interviews, and field observation, I found that students who participated in a YPAR program showed improved self-efficacy in …

Contributors
Cox, Timothy Soren, Boyd, Patricia R, Durand, Elizabeth S, et al.
Created Date
2017

Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field entails. To make matters worse, students who are introduced to computer science are frequently being fed only part of what it is about rather than its entire construction. Consequently, they feel out of their depth when they approach college. Research has discovered that by teaching computer science and programming through a problem-driven approach and focusing on a combination of syntax and computational thinking, students can be prepared when entering higher …

Contributors
Kury, Nizar, Nelson, Brian C, Hsiao, Ihan, et al.
Created Date
2017

The advancement of technology has substantively changed the practices of numerous professions, including teaching. When an instructor first adopts a new technology, established classroom practices are perturbed. These perturbations can have positive and negative, large or small, and long- or short-term effects on instructors’ abilities to teach mathematical concepts with the new technology. Therefore, in order to better understand teaching with technology, we need to take a closer look at the adoption of new technology in a mathematics classroom. Using interviews and classroom observations, I explored perturbations in mathematical classroom practices as an instructor implemented virtual manipulatives as novel didactic …

Contributors
Pampel, Krysten Ashley, Currin van de Sande, Carla, Thompson, Patrick W, et al.
Created Date
2017

Positive Youth Development (PYD) programs include intentional efforts by peers, adults, communities, schools, and organizations to provide opportunities for youth to increase their skills, abilities, and interests in positive activities. The goal of PYD is to provide positive outcomes where youth are viewed as resources to be developed rather than problems to be managed. Future generations rely on youth as active contributing members of society and PYD programs promote sustainable futures for young individuals and the community. PYD programs started in the United States and grew out of interest in prevention programs targeting risky behavior of youth. Interest is growing …

Contributors
Sieng, Michael, Cloutier, Scott, Dooley, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2017

Pediatric obesity is a continuing concern in the United States. Preventative intervention methods in the form of nutrition education, including hands-on cooking lessons may improve personal choices for healthy eating. This study assessed the effectiveness of Arizona State University’s Camp CRAVE, a one-week course promoting healthy eating and teaching basic cooking skills. Children ages 9-13years (mean 10.3years, n=31) participated in a pre- and post-test survey to assess if the one-week course would increase self-efficacy to cook at home and increase knowledge of nutrition. The course showed significant increase in the participants’ nutrition knowledge and preference for healthier food options. There …

Contributors
Bell, Kelly Marie, Johnston, Carol, Shepard, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2017

Electronic books or eBooks have the potential to revolutionize the way humans read and learn. eBooks offer many advantages such as simplicity, ease of use, eco-friendliness, and portability. The advancement of technology has introduced many forms of multimedia objects into eBooks, which may help people learn from them. To help the readers understand and comprehend a concept that is put forward by the author of an eBook, there is ongoing research involving the use of augmented reality (AR) in education. This study explores how AR and three-dimensional interactive models are integrated into eBooks to help the readers comprehend the content …

Contributors
Juluru, Kalyan Kumar, Atkinson, Robert K., Chen, Yinong, et al.
Created Date
2017