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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Real-world environments are characterized by non-stationary and continuously evolving data. Learning a classification model on this data would require a framework that is able to adapt itself to newer circumstances. Under such circumstances, transfer learning has come to be a dependable methodology for improving classification performance with reduced training costs and without the need for explicit relearning from scratch. In this thesis, a novel instance transfer technique that adapts a "Cost-sensitive" variation of AdaBoost is presented. The method capitalizes on the theoretical and functional properties of AdaBoost to selectively reuse outdated training instances obtained from a "source" domain to effectively …

Contributors
Venkatesan, Ashok, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2011

The rapid advancements of technology have greatly extended the ubiquitous nature of smartphones acting as a gateway to numerous social media applications. This brings an immense convenience to the users of these applications wishing to stay connected to other individuals through sharing their statuses, posting their opinions, experiences, suggestions, etc on online social networks (OSNs). Exploring and analyzing this data has a great potential to enable deep and fine-grained insights into the behavior, emotions, and language of individuals in a society. This proposed dissertation focuses on utilizing these online social footprints to research two main threads – 1) Analysis: to …

Contributors
Manikonda, Lydia, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2019

The ubiquity of single camera systems in society has made improving monocular depth estimation a topic of increasing interest in the broader computer vision community. Inspired by recent work in sparse-to-dense depth estimation, this thesis focuses on sparse patterns generated from feature detection based algorithms as opposed to regular grid sparse patterns used by previous work. This work focuses on using these feature-based sparse patterns to generate additional depth information by interpolating regions between clusters of samples that are in close proximity to each other. These interpolated sparse depths are used to enforce additional constraints on the network’s predictions. In …

Contributors
Rai, Anshul, Yang, Yezhou, Zhang, Wenlong, et al.
Created Date
2019

Reinforcement learning (RL) is a powerful methodology for teaching autonomous agents complex behaviors and skills. A critical component in most RL algorithms is the reward function -- a mathematical function that provides numerical estimates for desirable and undesirable states. Typically, the reward function must be hand-designed by a human expert and, as a result, the scope of a robot's autonomy and ability to safely explore and learn in new and unforeseen environments is constrained by the specifics of the designed reward function. In this thesis, I design and implement a stateful collision anticipation model with powerful predictive capability based upon …

Contributors
Richardson, Trevor W, Ben Amor, Heni, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2018