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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Membrane proteins are very important for all living cells, being involved in respiration, photosynthesis, cellular uptake and signal transduction, amongst other vital functions. However, less than 300 unique membrane protein structures have been determined to date, often due to difficulties associated with the growth of sufficiently large and well-ordered crystals. This work has been focused on showing the first proof of concept for using membrane protein nanocrystals and microcrystals for high-resolution structure determination. Upon determining that crystals of the membrane protein Photosystem I, which is the largest and most complex membrane protein crystallized to date, exist with only a hundred …

Contributors
Hunter, Mark S., Fromme, Petra, Wolf, George, et al.
Created Date
2011

ABSTRACT X-Ray crystallography and NMR are two major ways of achieving atomic resolution of structure determination for macro biomolecules such as proteins. Recently, new developments of hard X-ray pulsed free electron laser XFEL opened up new possibilities to break the dilemma of radiation dose and spatial resolution in diffraction imaging by outrunning radiation damage with ultra high brightness femtosecond X-ray pulses, which is so short in time that the pulse terminates before atomic motion starts. A variety of experimental techniques for structure determination of macro biomolecules is now available including imaging of protein nanocrystals, single particles such as viruses, pump-probe …

Contributors
Wang, Dingjie, Spence, John CH, Weierstall, Uwe, et al.
Created Date
2014

Photosystem II (PSII) is a large protein-cofactor complex. The first step in photosynthesis involves the harvesting of light energy from the sun by the antenna (made of pigments) of the PSII trans-membrane complex. The harvested excitation energy is transferred from the antenna complex to the reaction center of the PSII, which leads to a light-driven charge separation event, from water to plastoquinone. This phenomenal process has been producing the oxygen that maintains the oxygenic environment of our planet for the past 2.5 billion years. The oxygen molecule formation involves the light-driven extraction of 4 electrons and protons from two water …

Contributors
Basu, Shibom, Fromme, Petra, Spence, John C.H., et al.
Created Date
2015

Sample delivery is an essential component in biological imaging using serial diffraction from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotrons. Recent developments have made possible the near-atomic resolution structure determination of several important proteins, including one G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug target, whose structure could not easily have been determined otherwise (Appendix A). In this thesis I describe new sample delivery developments that are paramount to advancing this field beyond what has been accomplished to date. Soft Lithography was used to implement sample conservation in the Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzle (GDVN). A PDMS/glass composite microfluidic injector was created and given …

Contributors
Nelson, Garrett, Spence, John C, Weierstall, Uwe J, et al.
Created Date
2015