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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a specification that aims to support the conceptual modeling of metadata or information about resources in the form of a directed graph composed of triples of knowledge (facts). RDF also provides mechanisms to encode meta-information (such as source, trust, and certainty) about facts already existing in a knowledge base through a process called reification. In this thesis, an extension to the current RDF specification is proposed in order to enhance RDF triples with an application specific weight (cost). Unlike reification, this extension treats these additional weights as first class knowledge attributes in the RDF …

Contributors
Cedeno, Juan Pablo, Candan, Kasim S, Chen, Yi, et al.
Created Date
2010

Internet sites that support user-generated content, so-called Web 2.0, have become part of the fabric of everyday life in technologically advanced nations. Users collectively spend billions of hours consuming and creating content on social networking sites, weblogs (blogs), and various other types of sites in the United States and around the world. Given the fundamentally emotional nature of humans and the amount of emotional content that appears in Web 2.0 content, it is important to understand how such websites can affect the emotions of users. This work attempts to determine whether emotion spreads through an online social network (OSN). To …

Contributors
Cole, William David, Liu, Huan, Sarjoughian, Hessam, et al.
Created Date
2011

As pointed out in the keynote speech by H. V. Jagadish in SIGMOD'07, and also commonly agreed in the database community, the usability of structured data by casual users is as important as the data management systems' functionalities. A major hardness of using structured data is the problem of easily retrieving information from them given a user's information needs. Learning and using a structured query language (e.g., SQL and XQuery) is overwhelmingly burdensome for most users, as not only are these languages sophisticated, but the users need to know the data schema. Keyword search provides us with opportunities to conveniently …

Contributors
Liu, Ziyang, Chen, Yi, Candan, Kasim S, et al.
Created Date
2011

K-Nearest-Neighbors (KNN) search is a fundamental problem in many application domains such as database and data mining, information retrieval, machine learning, pattern recognition and plagiarism detection. Locality sensitive hash (LSH) is so far the most practical approximate KNN search algorithm for high dimensional data. Algorithms such as Multi-Probe LSH and LSH-Forest improve upon the basic LSH algorithm by varying hash bucket size dynamically at query time, so these two algorithms can answer different KNN queries adaptively. However, these two algorithms need a data access post-processing step after candidates' collection in order to get the final answer to the KNN query. …

Contributors
Yu, Renwei, Candan, Kasim S, Sapino, Maria L, et al.
Created Date
2011