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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Advances in technology are fueling a movement toward ubiquity for beyond-the-desktop systems. Novel interaction modalities, such as free space or full body gestures are becoming more common, as demonstrated by the rise of systems such as the Microsoft Kinect. However, much of the interaction design research for such systems is still focused on desktop and touch interactions. Current thinking in free-space gestures are limited in capability and imagination and most gesture studies have not attempted to identify gestures appropriate for public walk-up-and-use applications. A walk-up-and-use display must be discoverable, such that first-time users can use the system without any training, …

Contributors
Danielescu, Lavinia Andreea, Walker, Erin A, Burleson, Winslow, et al.
Created Date
2019

As digital images are transmitted over the network or stored on a disk, image processing is done as part of the standard for efficient storage and bandwidth. This causes some amount of distortion or artifacts in the image which demands the need for quality assessment. Subjective image quality assessment is expensive, time consuming and influenced by the subject's perception. Hence, there is a need for developing mathematical models that are capable of predicting the quality evaluation. With the advent of the information era and an exponential growth in image/video generation and consumption, the requirement for automated quality assessment has become …

Contributors
Kannan, Vignesh, Sohoni, Sohum, Ren, Fengbo, et al.
Created Date
2016

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts. The first part studies socially-aware mobile networking and computing. First, it studies random access control and power control under a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework. The socially-aware Nash equilibria (SNEs) are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies mobile crowdsensing under an incentive mechanism that exploits social trust assisted reciprocity (STAR). The efficacy of …

Contributors
Gong, Xiaowen, Zhang, Junshan, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation explores the role of smart home service provisions (SHSP) as motivational agents supporting goal attainment and human flourishing. Evoking human flourishing as a lens for interaction encapsulates issues of wellbeing, adaptation and problem solving within the context of social interaction. To investigate this line of research a new, motivation-sensitive approach to design was implemented. This approach combined psychometric analysis from motivational psychology's Personal Project Analysis (PPA) and Place Attachment theory's Sense of Place (SoP) analysis to produce project-centered motivational models for environmental congruence. Regression analysis of surveys collected from 150 (n = 150) young adults about their homes …

Contributors
Brotman, Ryan S., Burleson, Winsow, Heywood, William, et al.
Created Date
2013

Communication networks, both wired and wireless, are expected to have a certain level of fault-tolerance capability.These networks are also expected to ensure a graceful degradation in performance when some of the network components fail. Traditional studies on fault tolerance in communication networks, for the most part, make no assumptions regarding the location of node/link faults, i.e., the faulty nodes and links may be close to each other or far from each other. However, in many real life scenarios, there exists a strong spatial correlation among the faulty nodes and links. Such failures are often encountered in disaster situations, e.g., natural …

Contributors
Banerjee, Sujogya, Sen, Arunabha, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2013