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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




The purpose of this study was to examine compulsory schooling in the United States and its potential to provide an inconsistent avenue to employment for students from neighborhoods of differing socioeconomic status. Specifically, this study asked why do students from privileged neighborhoods typically end up in positions of ownership and management while those from impoverished urban or rural neighborhoods end up in working-class positions or involved in cycles of incarceration and poverty? This research involved the use of qualitative methods, including participant observation and interview, as well as photography, to take a look at a reputable private day school in …

Contributors
Theodoropoulos, Eftyhia, Margolis, Eric, Nakagawa, Kathryn, et al.
Created Date
2011

Construction Management research has not been successful in changing the practices of the construction industry. The method of receiving grants and the peer review paper system that academics rely on to achieve promotion, does not align to academic researchers becoming experts who can bring change to industry practices. Poor construction industry performance has been documented for the past 25 years in the international construction management field. However, after 25 years of billions of dollars of research investment, the solution remains elusive. Research has shown that very few researchers have a hypothesis, run cycles of research tests in the industry, and …

Contributors
Rivera, Alfredo Octavio, Kashiwagi, Dean T, Sullivan, Kenneth, et al.
Created Date
2014

Individual and group accountability is an important part of productive group work. However, classroom evaluation of teamwork often relies on top-down assessment of group product by the teacher. Other methods include averaging group grades, group discussions, evaluative essays and random selection and application of one member's grade to the entire team. In contrast, the Teamwork Skills Inventory (TSI) developed by Strom and Strom provides assessment of individual conduct and contributions as observed by peers. The instrument also affords students with the opportunity to judge their own performance. Team members are responsible for their own behavior and skill development but are …

Contributors
Brown, Denise Miller, Strom, Robert D., Stamm, Jill, et al.
Created Date
2010

Educators and therapists must unify and formulate new strategies to address the academic and social needs of a newly emerging at risk demographic, "the forgotten middle." Currently, a paradigm shift within educative music therapy, human development study, and educational psychology, suggests that curriculums need to integrate alternative methods into their framework, change the definition of at-risk, and recognize math aptitude and social competency as predictors of a student's ability to gain upward mobility and self-sufficiency. Musical interaction, although considered a secondary measure within educational forums, is a viable means to address the socio-emotional and academic needs of students. In order …

Contributors
Heiskell, James De Witt, Crowe, Barbara J, Rio, Robin, et al.
Created Date
2010

This document outlines the formation and development of Worth the Weight, or WTW, a platform that seeks to sustain the Breaking community in Phoenix, Arizona and connect the generations by bringing them together in a newly and never before seen event in Breaking, an all weight class and division competition. In the last five to ten years there has been a noticeable decline in the local Breaking community, in part due to the introduction of new dance categories, economic and social changes, the cross over of academia and traditional studios in Phoenix; all combining to create a lack of longevity …

Contributors
Magana, Jorge Edson, Vissicaro, Pegge, Schupp, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2015