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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Human walking has been a highly studied topic in research communities because of its extreme importance to human functionality and mobility. A complex system of interconnected gait mechanisms in humans is responsible for generating robust and consistent walking motion over unpredictable ground and through challenging obstacles. One interesting aspect of human gait is the ability to adjust in order to accommodate varying surface grades. Typical approaches to investigating this gait function focus on incline and decline surface angles, but most experiments fail to address the effects of surface grades that cause ankle inversion and eversion. There have been several studies …

Contributors
Barkan, Andrew Robert, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Lee, Hyunglae, et al.
Created Date
2016

Locomotion is of prime importance in enabling human beings to effectively respond in space and time to meet different needs. Approximately 2 million Americans live with an amputation with most of those amputations being of the lower limbs. To advance current state-of-the-art lower limb prosthetic devices, it is necessary to adapt performance at a level of intelligence seen in human walking. As such, this thesis focuses on the mechanisms involved during human walking, while transitioning from rigid to compliant surfaces such as from pavement to sand, grass or granular media. Utilizing a unique tool, the Variable Stiffness Treadmill (VST), as …

Contributors
Obeng, Ruby Afriyie, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2019

Object manipulation is a common sensorimotor task that humans perform to interact with the physical world. The first aim of this dissertation was to characterize and identify the role of feedback and feedforward mechanisms for force control in object manipulation by introducing a new feature based on force trajectories to quantify the interaction between feedback- and feedforward control. This feature was applied on two grasp contexts: grasping the object at either (1) predetermined or (2) self-selected grasp locations (“constrained” and “unconstrained”, respectively), where unconstrained grasping is thought to involve feedback-driven force corrections to a greater extent than constrained grasping. This …

Contributors
Mojtahedi, Keivan, Santello, Marco, Greger, Bradley, et al.
Created Date
2017

Humans' ability to perform fine object and tool manipulation is a defining feature of their sensorimotor repertoire. How the central nervous system builds and maintains internal representations of such skilled hand-object interactions has attracted significant attention over the past three decades. Nevertheless, two major gaps exist: a) how digit positions and forces are coordinated during natural manipulation tasks, and b) what mechanisms underlie the formation and retention of internal representations of dexterous manipulation. This dissertation addresses these two questions through five experiments that are based on novel grip devices and experimental protocols. It was found that high-level representation of manipulation …

Contributors
Fu, Qiushi, Santello, Marco, Helms Tillery, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2013

This dissertation aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and drawbacks of promising fall prevention strategies in individuals with stroke by rigorously analyzing the biomechanics of laboratory falls and compensatory movements required to prevent a fall. Ankle-foot-orthoses (AFOs) and functional electrical stimulators (FESs) are commonly prescribed to treat foot drop. Despite well-established positive impacts of AFOs and FES devices on balance and gait, AFO and FES users fall at a high rate. In chapter 2 (as a preliminary study), solely mechanical impacts of a semi-rigid AFO on the compensatory stepping response of young healthy individuals following trip-like treadmill perturbations were evaluated. It …

Contributors
Nevisipour, Masood, Honeycutt, Claire, Sugar, Thomas, et al.
Created Date
2019

Myoelectric control is lled with potential to signicantly change human-robot interaction. Humans desire compliant robots to safely interact in dynamic environments associated with daily activities. As surface electromyography non-invasively measures limb motion intent and correlates with joint stiness during co-contractions, it has been identied as a candidate for naturally controlling such robots. However, state-of-the-art myoelectric interfaces have struggled to achieve both enhanced functionality and long-term reliability. As demands in myoelectric interfaces trend toward simultaneous and proportional control of compliant robots, robust processing of multi-muscle coordinations, or synergies, plays a larger role in the success of the control scheme. This dissertation …

Contributors
Ison, Mark, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2015

Lower-limb prosthesis users have commonly-recognized deficits in gait and posture control. However, existing methods in balance and mobility analysis fail to provide sufficient sensitivity to detect changes in prosthesis users' postural control and mobility in response to clinical intervention or experimental manipulations and often fail to detect differences between prosthesis users and non-amputee control subjects. This lack of sensitivity limits the ability of clinicians to make informed clinical decisions and presents challenges with insurance reimbursement for comprehensive clinical care and advanced prosthetic devices. These issues have directly impacted clinical care by restricting device options, increasing financial burden on clinics, and …

Contributors
Howard, Charla Lindley, Abbas, James, Buneo, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2017