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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


A robotic swarm can be defined as a large group of inexpensive, interchangeable robots with limited sensing and/or actuating capabilities that cooperate (explicitly or implicitly) based on local communications and sensing in order to complete a mission. Its inherent redundancy provides flexibility and robustness to failures and environmental disturbances which guarantee the proper completion of the required task. At the same time, human intuition and cognition can prove very useful in extreme situations where a fast and reliable solution is needed. This idea led to the creation of the field of Human-Swarm Interfaces (HSI) which attempts to incorporate the human …

Contributors
Karavas, Georgios Konstantinos, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Berman, Spring M., et al.
Created Date
2017

To achieve the ambitious long-term goal of a feet of cooperating Flexible Autonomous Machines operating in an uncertain Environment (FAME), this thesis addresses several critical modeling, design, control objectives for rear-wheel drive ground vehicles. Toward this ambitious goal, several critical objectives are addressed. One central objective of the thesis was to show how to build low-cost multi-capability robot platform that can be used for conducting FAME research. A TFC-KIT car chassis was augmented to provide a suite of substantive capabilities. The augmented vehicle (FreeSLAM Robot) costs less than $500 but offers the capability of commercially available vehicles costing over $2000. …

Contributors
Lu, Xianglong, Rodriguez, Armando Antonio, Berman, Spring, et al.
Created Date
2016

Traditional methods for detecting the status of traffic lights used in autonomous vehicles may be susceptible to errors, which is troublesome in a safety-critical environment. In the case of vision-based recognition methods, failures may arise due to disturbances in the environment such as occluded views or poor lighting conditions. Some methods also depend on high-precision meta-data which is not always available. This thesis proposes a complementary detection approach based on an entirely new source of information: the movement patterns of other nearby vehicles. This approach is robust to traditional sources of error, and may serve as a viable supplemental detection …

Contributors
Campbell, Joseph, Fainekos, Georgios, Ben Amor, Heni, et al.
Created Date
2016