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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2015 2019


Most studies that explored the health benefits of interrupting sitting time focused on using different modalities (i.e., comparing walking vs standing breaks)33,36,59. However, experimental studies that directly compare patterns of interrupting sitting time through standing only are needed to advance the field. This study aimed to (i) determine if there is a difference in glucose response between continuous sitting (CS) and two intermittent standing regimes (high frequency, low duration breaks (HFLD) and low frequency, high duration breaks (LFHD)) and (ii) to determine if there is a difference in glucose response between the two strategies (HFLD vs. LFHD). Ten sedentary employees …

Contributors
Toledo, Meynard John Lapore, Buman, Matthew P, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2019

Through three investigations, this dissertation examined properties of the family and early care and education center (ECEC) environments related to preschool-aged children’s cardiovascular fitness (CVF) and gross locomotor skills (GLS). Investigation one used a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize the effectiveness of school-based interventions at improving CVF, in preschool-aged children. For investigations two and three product- and process-based measures of GLS were collected from children in ECECs (n=16), using the progressive aerobic cardiovascular endurance run (PACER; n=144) and the CHAMPS motor skill protocol (CMSP; n=91), respectively. Investigation two and three examined family factors and ECEC factors for associations with …

Contributors
Szeszulski, Jacob, Lee, Rebecca E, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2019

The purpose of this dissertation was 1) to develop noninvasive strategies to assess skeletal muscle size, architecture, and composition in young and old adults (study #1) and 2) evaluate the impact of chemotherapeutic treatment on skeletal muscle satellite cells and capillaries (study #2). For study #1 ultrasound images were obtained from the quadriceps muscles of young (8 m, 8 f) and older (7 m, 5 f) participants on two occasions, separated by 5-15 days. Images were collected while the participants were both standing and supine, and were analyzed for muscle thickness, pennation angle, and echogenicity. In addition, test-retest reliability and …

Contributors
D'Lugos, Andrew, Dickinson, Jared M, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2018

Many individual-level behavioral interventions improve health and well-being. However, most interventions exhibit considerable heterogeneity in response. Put differently, what might be effective on average might not be effective for specific individuals. From an individual’s perspective, many healthy behaviors exist that seem to have a positive impact. However, few existing tools support people in identifying interventions that work for them, personally. One approach to support such personalization is via self-experimentation using single-case designs. ‘Hack Your Health’ is a tool that guides individuals through an 18-day self-experiment to test if an intervention they choose (e.g., meditation, gratitude journaling) improves their own psychological …

Contributors
Phatak, Sayali Shekhar, Buman, Matthew P, Hekler, Eric B, et al.
Created Date
2019

The winter holiday period has been highlighted as a major risk period for weight gain due to excess caloric intake in the form of fat and sugar. Furthermore, diets high in fat and sugar have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exercise aids in the prevention of weight/fat gain, and prevents deleterious changes in cardiometabolic function. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a fat-sugar supplemented diet, with and without two different exercise training protocols, on body composition, glycemic control and other markers of cardiovascular disease in an at-risk population of overweight …

Contributors
Tucker, Wesley Jack, Gaesser, Glenn A, Angadi, Siddhartha S, et al.
Created Date
2016

Physical activity is critical for optimal health and has emerged as a viable option to improve sleep. Moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity comparisons to improve sleep in non-exercising adults with sleep problems is limited. The purpose was to determine the effects of moderate- or vigorous-intensity exercise on sleep outcomes and peripheral skin temperature compared to a no-exercise control. The exercise intensity preference also was determined. Eleven women (46.9±7.0 years) not participating in regular exercise and self-reporting insomnia completed a graded maximal exercise test followed by a crossover trial of three randomly assigned conditions separated by a 1-week washout. Participants performed …

Contributors
Kurka, Jonathan M., Ainsworth, Barbara E, Adams, Marc A, et al.
Created Date
2016

This study aimed to identify the emotional/affective sources of discrepancies between physical activity behavior and a widely used self-perception measure of physical activity motivation. Overweight women (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2, 18-64 years of age; N=37) were recruited from Arizona State University community through flyers and online newsletters. Participants wore a SenseWear accelerometer for 6 nights and 7 days and followed their normal patterns of daily living. Participants then completed a single lab visit and verbally responded to questions from the Behavorial Regulation Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) while being video and audio recorded. Captured emotional responses were evaluated with …

Contributors
Bryant, Sarah Elizabeth, Buman, Matthew P, Chisum, Jack W, et al.
Created Date
2016

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a theory-driven and a atheoretical reminder point-of-choice (PoC) prompt interventions on reducing workplace sedentary behavior in office workers with self-reported low usage (<4 hours per day) of their sit-stand workstations in the standing position. The design of this study was a cross-over trial including randomization into either the theory-driven or atheoertical reminder condition, after completion of a no prompt control condition. Participants (N=19) included full-time, primarily female, Caucasian, middle-aged office workers. The primary aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of these two PoC …

Contributors
Larouche, Miranda Leigh, Buman, Matthew P, Ainsworth, Barbara E, et al.
Created Date
2018

Having accurate measurements of sedentary behaviors is important to understand relationships between sedentary behaviors and health outcomes and to evaluate changes in interventions and health promotion programs designed to reduce sedentary behaviors. This dissertation included three projects that examined measurement properties of wearable monitors used to measure sedentary behaviors. Project one examined the validity of three monitors: the ActiGraph GT3X+, activPAL™, and SenseWear 2. None of the monitors were equivalent with the criterion measure of oxygen uptake to estimate the energy cost of sedentary and light-intensity activities. The ActivPAL™ had the best accuracy as compared with the other monitors. In …

Contributors
Florez Pregonero, Argemiro Alberto, Ainsworth, Barbara E, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2017

Background: Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization in older adults and has the highest 30-day readmission rate of all diagnoses. An estimated 30 to 60 percent of older adults lose some degree of physical function in the course of an acute hospital stay. Few studies have addressed the role of posture and mobility in contributing to, or improving, physical function in older hospitalized adults. No study to date that we are aware of has addressed this in the older heart failure population. Purpose: To investigate the predictive value of mobility during a hospital stay and patterns of mobility …

Contributors
Floegel, Theresa, Buman, Matthew P, Hooker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2015

Excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG) affects 50% of US pregnant women and may be an important contributor to obesity in both the mother and child. Novel strategies to prevent EGWG are needed to reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes for the mother and child. This dissertation presents three manuscripts that 1) propose a novel model to explain how prenatal yoga may prevent EGWG through behavioral, psychological/emotional, and physical factors, 2) test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a prenatal yoga intervention to prevent EGWG compared to a pregnancy education comparison group, and 3) qualitatively investigate pregnant women’s experiences participating …

Contributors
Green, Jennifer, Huberty, Jennifer L, Larkey, Linda K, et al.
Created Date
2019