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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2012 2019


Energy efficient design and management of data centers has seen considerable interest in the recent years owing to its potential to reduce the overall energy consumption and thereby the costs associated with it. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that new methods for improved physical design of data centers, resource management schemes for efficient workload distribution and sustainable operation for improving the energy efficiency, be developed and tested before implementation on an actual data center. The BlueTool project, provides such a state-of-the-art platform, both software and hardware, to design and analyze energy efficiency of data centers. The software platform, namely …

Contributors
Gilbert, Rose Robin, Gupta, Sandeep K.S, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, et al.
Created Date
2012

Humans' ability to perform fine object and tool manipulation is a defining feature of their sensorimotor repertoire. How the central nervous system builds and maintains internal representations of such skilled hand-object interactions has attracted significant attention over the past three decades. Nevertheless, two major gaps exist: a) how digit positions and forces are coordinated during natural manipulation tasks, and b) what mechanisms underlie the formation and retention of internal representations of dexterous manipulation. This dissertation addresses these two questions through five experiments that are based on novel grip devices and experimental protocols. It was found that high-level representation of manipulation …

Contributors
Fu, Qiushi, Santello, Marco, Helms Tillery, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2013

As robots are increasingly migrating out of factories and research laboratories and into our everyday lives, they should move and act in environments designed for humans. For this reason, the need of anthropomorphic movements is of utmost importance. The objective of this thesis is to solve the inverse kinematics problem of redundant robot arms that results to anthropomorphic configurations. The swivel angle of the elbow was used as a human arm motion parameter for the robot arm to mimic. The swivel angle is defined as the rotation angle of the plane defined by the upper and lower arm around a …

Contributors
Wang, Yuting, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Mignolet, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2013

Humans have an inherent capability of performing highly dexterous and skillful tasks with their arms, involving maintaining posture, movement and interacting with the environment. The latter requires for them to control the dynamic characteristics of the upper limb musculoskeletal system. Inertia, damping and stiffness, a measure of mechanical impedance, gives a strong representation of these characteristics. Many previous studies have shown that the arm posture is a dominant factor for determining the end point impedance in a horizontal plane (transverse plane). The objective of this thesis is to characterize end point impedance of the human arm in the three dimensional …

Contributors
Patel, Harshil, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Berman, Spring, et al.
Created Date
2013

Electromyogram (EMG)-based control interfaces are increasingly used in robot teleoperation, prosthetic devices control and also in controlling robotic exoskeletons. Over the last two decades researchers have come up with a plethora of decoding functions to map myoelectric signals to robot motions. However, this requires a lot of training and validation data sets, while the parameters of the decoding function are specific for each subject. In this thesis we propose a new methodology that doesn't require training and is not user-specific. The main idea is to supplement the decoding functional error with the human ability to learn inverse model of an …

Contributors
Antuvan, Chris Wilson, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Muthuswamy, Jitendran, et al.
Created Date
2013

As robotic systems are used in increasingly diverse applications, the interaction of humans and robots has become an important area of research. In many of the applications of physical human robot interaction (pHRI), the robot and the human can be seen as cooperating to complete a task with some object of interest. Often these applications are in unstructured environments where many paths can accomplish the goal. This creates a need for the ability to communicate a preferred direction of motion between both participants in order to move in coordinated way. This communication method should be bidirectional to be able to …

Contributors
Whitsell, Bryan, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2014

Wearable robots including exoskeletons, powered prosthetics, and powered orthotics must add energy to the person at an appropriate time to enhance, augment, or supplement human performance. Adding energy while not being in sync with the user can dramatically hurt performance making it necessary to have correct timing with the user. Many human tasks such as walking, running, and hopping are repeating or cyclic tasks and a robot can add energy in sync with the repeating pattern for assistance. A method has been developed to add energy at the appropriate time to the repeating limit cycle based on a phase oscillator. …

Contributors
Wheeler, Chase Bryan, Sugar, Thomas G, Redkar, Sangram, et al.
Created Date
2014

As the robotic industry becomes increasingly present in some of the more extreme environments such as the battle field, disaster sites or extraplanetary exploration, it will be necessary to provide locomotive niche strategies that are optimal to each terrain. The hopping gait has been well studied in robotics and proven to be a potential method to fit some of these niche areas. There have been some difficulties in producing terrain following controllers that maintain robust, steady state, which are disturbance resistant. The following thesis will discuss a controller which has shown the ability to produce these desired properties. A phase …

Contributors
New, Philip Wesley, Sugar, Thomas G, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, et al.
Created Date
2015

Myoelectric control is lled with potential to signicantly change human-robot interaction. Humans desire compliant robots to safely interact in dynamic environments associated with daily activities. As surface electromyography non-invasively measures limb motion intent and correlates with joint stiness during co-contractions, it has been identied as a candidate for naturally controlling such robots. However, state-of-the-art myoelectric interfaces have struggled to achieve both enhanced functionality and long-term reliability. As demands in myoelectric interfaces trend toward simultaneous and proportional control of compliant robots, robust processing of multi-muscle coordinations, or synergies, plays a larger role in the success of the control scheme. This dissertation …

Contributors
Ison, Mark, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2015

Human walking has been a highly studied topic in research communities because of its extreme importance to human functionality and mobility. A complex system of interconnected gait mechanisms in humans is responsible for generating robust and consistent walking motion over unpredictable ground and through challenging obstacles. One interesting aspect of human gait is the ability to adjust in order to accommodate varying surface grades. Typical approaches to investigating this gait function focus on incline and decline surface angles, but most experiments fail to address the effects of surface grades that cause ankle inversion and eversion. There have been several studies …

Contributors
Barkan, Andrew Robert, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Lee, Hyunglae, et al.
Created Date
2016