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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


As the robotic industry becomes increasingly present in some of the more extreme environments such as the battle field, disaster sites or extraplanetary exploration, it will be necessary to provide locomotive niche strategies that are optimal to each terrain. The hopping gait has been well studied in robotics and proven to be a potential method to fit some of these niche areas. There have been some difficulties in producing terrain following controllers that maintain robust, steady state, which are disturbance resistant. The following thesis will discuss a controller which has shown the ability to produce these desired properties. A phase …

Contributors
New, Philip Wesley, Sugar, Thomas G, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, et al.
Created Date
2015

Human walking has been a highly studied topic in research communities because of its extreme importance to human functionality and mobility. A complex system of interconnected gait mechanisms in humans is responsible for generating robust and consistent walking motion over unpredictable ground and through challenging obstacles. One interesting aspect of human gait is the ability to adjust in order to accommodate varying surface grades. Typical approaches to investigating this gait function focus on incline and decline surface angles, but most experiments fail to address the effects of surface grades that cause ankle inversion and eversion. There have been several studies …

Contributors
Barkan, Andrew Robert, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Lee, Hyunglae, et al.
Created Date
2016

Unmanned aerial vehicles have received increased attention in the last decade due to their versatility, as well as the availability of inexpensive sensors (e.g. GPS, IMU) for their navigation and control. Multirotor vehicles, specifically quadrotors, have formed a fast growing field in robotics, with the range of applications spanning from surveil- lance and reconnaissance to agriculture and large area mapping. Although in most applications single quadrotors are used, there is an increasing interest in architectures controlling multiple quadrotors executing a collaborative task. This thesis introduces a new concept of control involving more than one quadrotors, according to which two quadrotors …

Contributors
Larsson, Daniel, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Marvi, Hamidreza, et al.
Created Date
2016