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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2018


Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is limited in speed and resolution by the inherently low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the underlying signal. Advances in sampling efficiency are required to support future improvements in scan time and resolution. SNR efficiency is improved by sampling data for a larger proportion of total imaging time. This is challenging as these acquisitions are typically subject to artifacts such as blurring and distortions. The current work proposes a set of tools to help with the creation of different types of SNR efficient scans. An SNR efficient pulse sequence providing diffusion imaging data with full …

Contributors
Aboussouan, Eric, Frakes, David, Pipe, James, et al.
Created Date
2011

Single cell phenotypic heterogeneity studies reveal more information about the pathogenesis process than conventional bulk methods. Furthermore, investigation of the individual cellular response mechanism during rapid environmental changes can only be achieved at single cell level. By enabling the study of cellular morphology, a single cell three-dimensional (3D) imaging system can be used to diagnose fatal diseases, such as cancer, at an early stage. One proven method, CellCT, accomplishes 3D imaging by rotating a single cell around a fixed axis. However, some existing cell rotating mechanisms require either intricate microfabrication, and some fail to provide a suitable environment for living …

Contributors
Zhang, Wenjie, Frakes, David, Meldrum, Deirdre, et al.
Created Date
2011

Treatment of cerebral aneurysms using non-invasive methods has existed for decades. Since the advent of modern endovascular techniques, advancements to embolic materials have largely focused on improving platinum coil technology. However, the recent development of Onyx®, a liquid-delivery precipitating polymer system, has opened the door for a new class of embolic materials--liquid-fill systems. These liquid-fill materials have the potential to provide better treatment outcomes than platinum coils. Initial clinical use of Onyx has proven promising, but not without substantial drawbacks, such as co-delivery of angiotoxic compounds and an extremely technical delivery procedure. This work focuses on formulation, characterization and testing …

Contributors
Riley, Celeste, Vernon, Brent L, Preul, Mark C, et al.
Created Date
2011

Microfluidics is the study of fluid flow at very small scales (micro -- one millionth of a meter) and is prevalent in many areas of science and engineering. Typical applications include lab-on-a-chip devices, microfluidic fuel cells, and DNA separation technologies. Many of these microfluidic devices rely on micron-resolution velocimetry measurements to improve microchannel design and characterize existing devices. Methods such as micro particle imaging velocimetry (microPIV) and micro particle tracking velocimetry (microPTV) are mature and established methods for characterization of steady 2D flow fields. Increasingly complex microdevices require techniques that measure unsteady and/or three dimensional velocity fields. This dissertation presents …

Contributors
Klein, Steven Adam, Posner, Jonathan D, Adrian, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2011

Over the past fifty years, the development of sensors for biological applications has increased dramatically. This rapid growth can be attributed in part to the reduction in feature size, which the electronics industry has pioneered over the same period. The decrease in feature size has led to the production of microscale sensors that are used for sensing applications, ranging from whole-body monitoring down to molecular sensing. Unfortunately, sensors are often developed without regard to how they will be integrated into biological systems. The complexities of integration are underappreciated. Integration involves more than simply making electrical connections. Interfacing microscale sensors with …

Contributors
Welch, David, Blain Christen, Jennifer, Muthuswamy, Jitendran, et al.
Created Date
2012

There is a growing interest for improved high-accuracy camera calibration methods due to the increasing demand for 3D visual media in commercial markets. Camera calibration is used widely in the fields of computer vision, robotics and 3D reconstruction. Camera calibration is the first step for extracting 3D data from a 2D image. It plays a crucial role in computer vision and 3D reconstruction due to the fact that the accuracy of the reconstruction and 3D coordinate determination relies on the accuracy of the camera calibration to a great extent. This thesis presents a novel camera calibration method using a circular …

Contributors
Prakash, Charan Dudda, Karam, Lina J, Frakes, David, et al.
Created Date
2012

Single cell analysis has become increasingly important in understanding disease onset, progression, treatment and prognosis, especially when applied to cancer where cellular responses are highly heterogeneous. Through the advent of single cell computerized tomography (Cell-CT), researchers and clinicians now have the ability to obtain high resolution three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of single cells. Yet to date, no live-cell compatible version of the technology exists. In this thesis, a microfluidic chip with the ability to rotate live single cells in hydrodynamic microvortices about an axis parallel to the optical focal plane has been demonstrated. The chip utilizes a novel 3D microchamber design …

Contributors
Myers, Jakrey, Meldrum, Deirdre, Johnson, Roger, et al.
Created Date
2012

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common cause of blindness occurring due to prolonged presence of diabetes. The risk of developing DR or having the disease progress is increasing over time. Despite advances in diabetes care over the years, DR remains a vision-threatening complication and one of the leading causes of blindness among American adults. Recent studies have shown that diagnosis based on digital retinal imaging has potential benefits over traditional face-to-face evaluation. Yet there is a dearth of computer-based systems that can match the level of performance achieved by ophthalmologists. This thesis takes a fresh perspective in developing a computer-based …

Contributors
Chandakkar, Parag Shridhar, Li, Baoxin, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2012

Recent advances in camera architectures and associated mathematical representations now enable compressive acquisition of images and videos at low data-rates. While most computer vision applications of today are composed of conventional cameras, which collect a large amount redundant data and power hungry embedded systems, which compress the collected data for further processing, compressive cameras offer the advantage of direct acquisition of data in compressed domain and hence readily promise to find applicability in computer vision, particularly in environments hampered by limited communication bandwidths. However, despite the significant progress in theory and methods of compressive sensing, little headway has been made …

Contributors
Kulkarni, Kuldeep Sharad, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2012

Human operators have difficulty driving cranes quickly, accurately, and safely because of the slow response of heavy crane structures, non-intuitive control interfaces, and payload oscillations. Recently, a novel hand-motion crane control system has been proposed to improve performance by coupling an intuitive control interface with an element that reduces the complex oscillatory behavior of the payload. Hand-motion control allows operators to drive a crane by simply moving a hand-held radio-frequency tag through the desired path. Real-time location sensors are used to track the movements of the tag and the tag position is used in a feedback control loop to drive …

Contributors
Ragunathan, Sudarshan, Frakes, David, Singhose, William, et al.
Created Date
2012