Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2018


A method for evaluating the integrity of geosynthetic elements of a waste containment system subject to seismic loading is developed using a large strain finite difference numerical computer program. The method accounts for the effect of interaction between the geosynthetic elements and the overlying waste on seismic response and allows for explicit calculation of forces and strains in the geosynthetic elements. Based upon comparison of numerical results to experimental data, an elastic-perfectly plastic interface model is demonstrated to adequately reproduce the cyclic behavior of typical geomembrane-geotextile and geomembrane-geomembrane interfaces provided the appropriate interface properties are used. New constitutive models are …

Contributors
Arab, Mohamed G., Kavazanjian, Edward, Zapata, Claudia, et al.
Created Date
2011

As a prelude to a study on the post-liquefaction properties and structure of soil, an investigation of ground freezing as an undisturbed sampling technique was conducted to investigate the ability of this sampling technique to preserve soil structure and properties. Freezing the ground is widely regarded as an appropriate technique to recover undisturbed samples of saturated cohesionless soil for laboratory testing, despite the fact that water increases in volume when frozen. The explanation generally given for the preservation of soil structure using the freezing technique was that, as long as the freezing front advanced uni-directionally, the expanding pore water is …

Contributors
Katapa, Kanyembo, Kavazanjian, Edward, Houston, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2011

In a laboratory setting, the soil volume change behavior is best represented by using various testing standards on undisturbed or remolded samples. Whenever possible, it is most precise to use undisturbed samples to assess the volume change behavior but in the absence of undisturbed specimens, remodeled samples can be used. If that is the case, the soil is compacted to in-situ density and water content (or matric suction), which should best represent the expansive profile in question. It is standard practice to subject the specimen to a wetting process at a particular net normal stress. Even though currently accepted laboratory …

Contributors
Rosenbalm, Daniel Curtis, Zapata, Claudia E, Houston, Sandra L, et al.
Created Date
2013

The objective of the research is to develop guidelines for identifying when settlement or seismic loading presents a threat to the integrity of geosynthetic elements for both side slope and cover systems in landfills, and advance further investigation for parameters which influence the strains in the barrier systems. A numerical model of landfill with different side slope inclinations are developed by the two-dimensional explicit finite difference program FLAC 7.0, beam elements with a hyperbolic stress-strain relationship, zero moment of inertia, and interface elements on both sides were used to model the geosynthetic barrier systems. The resulting numerical model demonstrates the …

Contributors
Wu, Xuan, Kavazanjian, Edward, Zapata, Claudia, et al.
Created Date
2013

Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) is attracting increasing attention as a sustainable means of soil improvement. While there are several possible MICP mechanisms, microbial denitrification has the potential to become one of the preferred methods for MICP because complete denitrification does not produce toxic byproducts, readily occurs under anoxic conditions, and potentially has a greater carbonate yield per mole of organic electron donor than other MICP processes. Denitrification may be preferable to ureolytic hydrolysis, the MICP process explored most extensively to date, as the byproduct of denitrification is benign nitrogen gas, while the chemical pathways involved in hydrolytic ureolysis …

Contributors
Hamdan, Nasser, Kavazanjian, Edward, Rittmann, Bruce E, et al.
Created Date
2013

This thesis presents a probabilistic evaluation of multiple laterally loaded drilled pier foundation design approaches using extensive data from a geotechnical investigation for a high voltage electric transmission line. A series of Monte Carlo simulations provide insight about the computed level of reliability considering site standard penetration test blow count value variability alone (i.e., assuming all other aspects of the design problem do not contribute error or bias). Evaluated methods include Eurocode 7 Geotechnical Design procedures, the Federal Highway Administration drilled shaft LRFD design method, the Electric Power Research Institute transmission foundation design procedure and a site specific variability based …

Contributors
Heim, Zackary, Houston, Sandra, Witczak, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2014

The dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, or denitrification, offers the potential of a sustainable, cost effective method for the non-disruptive mitigation of earthquake-induced soil liquefaction. Worldwide, trillions of dollars of infrastructure are at risk for liquefaction damage in earthquake prone regions. However, most techniques for remediating liquefiable soils are either not applicable to sites near existing infrastructure, or are prohibitively expensive. Recently, laboratory studies have shown the potential for biogeotechnical soil improvement techniques such as microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) to mitigate liquefaction potential in a non-disruptive manner. Multiple microbial processes have been identified for MICP, but only two have been …

Contributors
O'Donnell, Sean Thomas, Kavazanjian, Edward, Rittmann, Bruce, et al.
Created Date
2016

Nanotechnology has been applied to many areas such as medicine, manufacturing, catalysis, food, cosmetics, and energy since the beginning 21st century. However, the application of nanotechnology to geotechnical engineering has not received much attention. This research explored the technical benefits and the feasibility of applying nanoparticles in geotechnical engineering. Specific studies were conducted by utilizing high-pressure devices, axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA), microfluidics, time-lapse technology, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to develop experiments. The effects of nanoparticle on modifying interfacial tension, wettability, viscosity, sweep efficiency and surface attraction forces were investigated. The results show that nanoparticles mixed in water can significantly …

Contributors
Zheng, Xianglei, Jang, Jaewon, Zapata, Claudia, et al.
Created Date
2016

A numerical model for design of the geomembrane elements of waste containment systems has been validated by laboratory testing. Due to the absence of any instrumented case histories of seismic performance of geomembrane liner systems, a large scale centrifuge test of a model geomembrane-lined landfill subject to seismic loading was conducted at the University of California at Davis Centrifuge Test facility as part of National Science Foundation Network for Earthquake the Engineering Simulation Research (NEESR) program. Data collected in the large scale centrifuge test included waste settlement, liner strains and earthquake accelerations at various locations throughout the model. This data …

Contributors
Wu, Xuan, Kavazanjian, Edward, Zapata, Claudia, et al.
Created Date
2017

Recent research efforts have been directed to improve the quality of pavement design procedures by considering the transient nature of soil properties due to environmental and aging effects on pavement performance. The main purpose of this research study was to investigate the existence of subgrade soil moisture changes that may have arisen due to thermal and hydraulic gradients at the Atlantic City NAPTF and to evaluate their effect on the material stiffness and the California Bearing Ratio (CBR) strength parameter of the clay subgrade materials. Laboratory data showed that at the same water content, matric suction decreases with increasing temperature; …

Contributors
Thirthar Palanivelu, Pugazhvel, Zapata, Claudia E, Kavazanjian, Edward, et al.
Created Date
2017