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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2019


Composite materials are widely used in various structural applications, including within the automotive and aerospace industries. Unidirectional composite layups have replaced other materials such as metals due to composites’ high strength-to-weight ratio and durability. Finite-element (FE) models are actively being developed to model response of composite systems subjected to a variety of loads including impact loads. These FE models rely on an array of measured material properties as input for accuracy. This work focuses on an orthotropic plasticity constitutive model that has three components – deformation, damage and failure. The model relies on the material properties of the composite such …

Contributors
Schmidt, Nathan William, Rajan, Subramaniam, Neithalath, Narayanan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Composite materials are now beginning to provide uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems such as airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. These structural systems are often subjected to impact loads and there is a pressing need for accurate prediction of deformation, damage and failure. There are numerous material models that have been developed to analyze the dynamic impact response of polymer matrix composites. However, there are key features that are missing in those models that prevent them from providing accurate predictive capabilities. In this dissertation, a general purpose orthotropic elasto-plastic …

Contributors
Hoffarth, Canio, Rajan, Subramaniam, Goldberg, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2016

As the demand of sustainable construction materials increases, use of fibers and textiles as partial or full reinforcement in concrete members present a tremendous opportunity. Proper characterization techniques and design guides for hybrid materials are therefore needed. This dissertation presents a comprehensive study on serviceability-based design of strain softening and strain hardening materials. Multiple experimental procedures are developed to document the nature of single crack localization and multiple cracking mechanisms in various fiber and fabric reinforced cement-based composites. In addition, strain rate effects on the mechanical properties are examined using a high speed servo-hydraulic tension test equipment. Significant hardening and …

Contributors
Yao, Yiming, Mobasher, Barzin, Underwood, Benjamin, et al.
Created Date
2016

The concept of Creep is a term used to define the tendency of stressed materials to develop an increasing strain through time under a sustained load, thus having an increase in deflection or having an elongation with time in relation to the short term strain. While the subject of compression creep of concrete is well developed, use of concrete under tension loads has been limited at best due to brittleness of concrete. However with the advent of using fiber reinforced concrete, more and more applications where concrete is expected to carry tensile loads due to incorporation of fibers is gaining …

Contributors
Gohel, Megha Rajendrakumar, Mobasher, Barzin, Dharmarajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2017

Pultrusion manufacturing technique stands at the forefront for efficient production of continuous, uniform concrete composites for use in large scale structural applications. High volume and low labor, among other benefits such as improved impregnation and better sample consistency, stand as some of the crucial advances found in automated pultrusion. These advantages introduce textile reinforced concrete (TRC) composites as a potential surrogate for wood, light gauge steel, and other common structural materials into an ever changing and broadening market of industrial grade structural sections. With the potential modifications of textile geometry, textile type, section geometry, and connection type, the options presented …

Contributors
Bauchmoyer, Jacob MacGregor, Mobasher, Barzin, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2017

The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of polypropylene fiber morphology on the tensile response of cementitious composites. Two proprietary polypropylene fibers manufactured by BASF – MAC 2200CB, a crimped monofilament macro fiber and MF40, a bundled multi filament polypropylene made up of 500 filaments,40-micron diameter each were compared. The stiff structure and crimped geometry of MAC 2200 CB was studied in comparison with the multifilament MF40, which provide a higher surface area and a bundled fiber effect. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on individual fibers to study fiber strength and failure pattern at three different …

Contributors
Mehere, Himai Ashok, Mobasher, Barzin, Dharmarajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2017

Concrete is relatively brittle, and its tensile strength is typically only about one-tenth of its compressive strength. Regular concrete is therefore normally uses reinforcement steel bars to increase the tensile strength. It is becoming increasingly popular to use random distributed fibers as reinforcement and polymeric fibers is once such kind. In the case of polymeric fibers, due to hydrophobicity and lack of any chemical bond between the fiber and matrix, the weak interface zone limits the ability of the fibers to effectively carry the load that is on the matrix phase. Depending on the fiber’s surface asperity, shape, chemical nature, …

Contributors
Tiwari, Sanchay Sushil, Mobasher, Barzin, Neithalath, Narayanan, et al.
Created Date
2018

This research summarizes the validation testing completed for the material model MAT213, currently implemented in the LS-DYNA finite element program. Testing was carried out using a carbon fiber composite material, T800-F3900. Stacked-ply tension and compression tests were performed for open-hole and full coupons. Comparisons of experimental and simulation results showed a good agreement between the two for metrics including, stress-strain response and displacements. Strains and displacements in the direction of loading were better predicted by the simulations than for that of the transverse direction. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed experimentally and through simulations to determine …

Contributors
Holt, Nathan T, Rajan, Subramaniam, Mobasher, Barzin, et al.
Created Date
2018

Phase change materials (PCMs) are combined sensible-and-latent thermal energy storage materials that can be used to store and dissipate energy in the form of heat. PCMs incorporated into wall-element systems have been well-studied with respect to energy efficiency of building envelopes. New applications of PCMs in infrastructural concrete, e.g., for mitigating early-age cracking and freeze-and-thaw induced damage, have also been proposed. Hence, the focus of this dissertation is to develop a detailed understanding of the physic-chemical and thermo-mechanical characteristics of cementitious systems and novel coating systems for wall-elements containing PCM. The initial phase of this work assesses the influence of …

Contributors
Aguayo, Matthew Joseph, Neithalath, Narayanan, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2018

With the growth of global population, the demand for sustainable infrastructure is significantly increasing. Substructures with appropriate materials are required to be built in or above soil that can support the massive volume of construction demand. However, increased structural requirements often require ground improvement to increase the soil capacity. Moreover, certain soils are prone to liquefaction during an earthquake, which results in significant structural damage and loss of lives. While various soil treatment methods have been developed in the past to improve the soil’s load carrying ability, most of these traditional treatment methods have been found either hazardous and may …

Contributors
Yang, Pu, Neithalath, Narayanan, Kavazanjian, Edward, et al.
Created Date
2018