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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Silicon carbide (SiC), long touted as a material that can satisfy the specific property requirements for high temperature and high power applications, was studied quantitatively using various techniques. The electronic band structure of 4H SiC is examined in the first half of this dissertation. A brief introduction to band structure calculations, with particular emphasis on the empirical pseudopotential method, is given as a foundation for the subsequent work. Next, the crystal pseudopotential for 4H SiC is derived in detail, and a novel approach using a genetic algorithm search routine is employed to find the fitting parameters needed to generate the …

Contributors
Ng, Garrick, Schroder, Dieter K, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2010

Implantable medical device technology is commonly used by doctors for disease management, aiding to improve patient quality of life. However, it is possible for these devices to be exposed to ionizing radiation during various medical therapeutic and diagnostic activities while implanted. This commands that these devices remain fully operational during, and long after, radiation exposure. Many implantable medical devices employ standard commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes for integrated circuit (IC) development, which have been shown to degrade with radiation exposure. This necessitates that device manufacturers study the effects of ionizing radiation on their products, and work to mitigate those effects …

Contributors
Schlenvogt, Garrett James, Barnaby, Hugh J, Goodnick, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2010

ABSTRACT An Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) computer code has been developed to simulate, semi-classically, spin-dependent electron transport in quasi two-dimensional (2D) III-V semiconductors. The code accounts for both three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-2D transport, utilizing either 3D or 2D scattering mechanisms, as appropriate. Phonon, alloy, interface roughness, and impurity scattering mechanisms are included, accounting for the Pauli Exclusion Principle via a rejection algorithm. The 2D carrier states are calculated via a self-consistent 1D Schrödinger-3D-Poisson solution in which the charge distribution of the 2D carriers in the quantization direction is taken as the spatial distribution of the squared envelope functions within the …

Contributors
Tierney, Brian David, Goodnick, Stephen, Ferry, David, et al.
Created Date
2011

Radiation-induced gain degradation in bipolar devices is considered to be the primary threat to linear bipolar circuits operating in the space environment. The damage is primarily caused by charged particles trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere, the solar wind, and cosmic rays. This constant radiation exposure leads to early end-of-life expectancies for many electronic parts. Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the density of oxide and interfacial defects in bipolar oxides leading to an increase in base current in bipolar junction transistors. Radiation-induced excess base current is the primary cause of current gain degradation. Analysis of base current response can enable the …

Contributors
Campola, Michael Joseph, Barnaby, Hugh J, Holbert, Keith E, et al.
Created Date
2011

Semiconductor devices are generally analyzed with relatively simple equations or with detailed computer simulations. Most text-books use these simple equations and show device diagrams that are frequently very simplified and occasionally incorrect. For example, the carrier densities near the pinch-off point in MOSFETs and JFETs and the minority carrier density in the base near the reverse-biased base-collector junction are frequently assumed to be zero or near zero. Also the channel thickness at the pinch-off point is often shown to approach zero. None of these assumptions can be correct. The research in thesis addresses these points. I simulated the carrier densities, …

Contributors
Yang, Xuan, Schroder, Dieter K, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2011

A primary motivation of research in photovoltaic technology is to obtain higher efficiency photovoltaic devices at reduced cost of production so that solar electricity can be cost competitive. The majority of photovoltaic technologies are based on p-n junction, with efficiency potential being much lower than the thermodynamic limits of individual technologies and thereby providing substantial scope for further improvements in efficiency. The thesis explores photovoltaic devices using new physical processes that rely on thin layers and are capable of attaining the thermodynamic limit of photovoltaic technology. Silicon heterostructure is one of the candidate technologies in which thin films induce a …

Contributors
Ghosh, Kunal, Bowden, Stuart, Honsberg, Christiana, et al.
Created Date
2011

In very small electronic devices the alternate capture and emission of carriers at an individual defect site located at the interface of Si:SiO2 of a MOSFET generates discrete switching in the device conductance referred to as a random telegraph signal (RTS) or random telegraph noise (RTN). In this research work, the integration of random defects positioned across the channel at the Si:SiO2 interface from source end to the drain end in the presence of different random dopant distributions are used to conduct Ensemble Monte-Carlo ( EMC ) based numerical simulation of key device performance metrics for 45 nm gate length …

Contributors
Ashraf, Nabil Shovon, Vasileska, Dragica, Schroder, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2011

One of the challenges in future semiconductor device design is excessive rise of power dissipation and device temperatures. With the introduction of new geometrically confined device structures like SOI, FinFET, nanowires and continuous incorporation of new materials with poor thermal conductivities in the device active region, the device thermal problem is expected to become more challenging in coming years. This work examines the degradation in the ON-current due to self-heating effects in 10 nm channel length silicon nanowire transistors. As part of this dissertation, a 3D electrothermal device simulator is developed that self-consistently solves electron Boltzmann transport equation with 3D …

Contributors
Hossain, Arif, Vasileska, Dragica, Ahmed, Shaikh, et al.
Created Date
2011

There will always be a need for high current/voltage transistors. A transistor that has the ability to be both or either of these things is the silicon metal-silicon field effect transistor (MESFET). An additional perk that silicon MESFET transistors have is the ability to be integrated into the standard silicon on insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process flow. This makes a silicon MESFET transistor a very valuable device for use in any standard CMOS circuit that may usually need a separate integrated circuit (IC) in order to switch power on or from a high current/voltage because it allows …

Contributors
Sochacki, John J., Thornton, Trevor J, Schroder, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2011

The long wavelength infrared region (LWIR) and mid wavelength infrared region (MWIR) are of great interest as detection in this region offers a wide range of real time applications. Optoelectronic devices operating in the LWIR and MWIR region offer potential applications such as; optical gas sensing, free-space optical communications, infrared counter-measures, biomedical and thermal imaging etc. HgCdTe is a prominent narrow bandgap material that operates in the LWIR region. The focus of this research work is to simulate and analyze the characteristics of a Hg1-xCdxTe photodetector. To achieve this, the tool `OPTODET' has been developed, where various device parameters can …

Contributors
Muralidharan, Pradyumna, Vasileska, Dragica, Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S, et al.
Created Date
2011