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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Although the issue of factorial invariance has received increasing attention in the literature, the focus is typically on differences in factor structure across groups that are directly observed, such as those denoted by sex or ethnicity. While establishing factorial invariance across observed groups is a requisite step in making meaningful cross-group comparisons, failure to attend to possible sources of latent class heterogeneity in the form of class-based differences in factor structure has the potential to compromise conclusions with respect to observed groups and may result in misguided attempts at instrument development and theory refinement. The present studies examined the sensitivity …

Contributors
Blackwell, Kimberly Carol, Millsap, Roger E, Aiken, Leona S, et al.
Created Date
2011

The present study examined the association of pain intensity and goal progress in a community sample of 132 adults with chronic pain who participated in a 21 day diary study. Multilevel modeling was employed to investigate the effect of morning pain intensity on evening goal progress as mediated by pain's interference with afternoon goal pursuit. Moderation effects of pain acceptance and pain catastrophizing on the associations between pain and interference with both work and lifestyle goal pursuit were also tested. The results showed that the relationship between morning pain and pain's interference with work goal pursuit in the afternoon was …

Contributors
Mun, Chung Jung, Karoly, Paul, Okun, Morris A, et al.
Created Date
2014

Missing data are common in psychology research and can lead to bias and reduced power if not properly handled. Multiple imputation is a state-of-the-art missing data method recommended by methodologists. Multiple imputation methods can generally be divided into two broad categories: joint model (JM) imputation and fully conditional specification (FCS) imputation. JM draws missing values simultaneously for all incomplete variables using a multivariate distribution (e.g., multivariate normal). FCS, on the other hand, imputes variables one at a time, drawing missing values from a series of univariate distributions. In the single-level context, these two approaches have been shown to be equivalent …

Contributors
Mistler, Stephen Andrew, Enders, Craig K, Aiken, Leona, et al.
Created Date
2015