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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Swarms of animals, fish, birds, locusts etc. are a common occurrence but their coherence and method of organization poses a major question for mathematics and biology.The Vicsek and the Attraction-Repulsion are two models that have been proposed to explain the emergence of collective motion. A major issue for the Vicsek Model is that its particles are not attracted to each other, leaving the swarm with alignment in velocity but without spatial coherence. Restricting the particles to a bounded domain generates global spatial coherence of swarms while maintaining velocity alignment. While individual particles are specularly reflected at the boundary, the swarm …

Contributors
Thatcher, Andrea, Armbruster, Hans, Motsch, Sebastien, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation investigates the dynamics of evolutionary games based on the framework of interacting particle systems in which individuals are discrete, space is explicit, and dynamics are stochastic. Its focus is on 2-strategy games played on a d-dimensional integer lattice with a range of interaction M. An overview of related past work is given along with a summary of the dynamics in the mean-field model, which is described by the replicator equation. Then the dynamics of the interacting particle system is considered, first when individuals are updated according to the best-response update process and then the death-birth update process. Several …

Contributors
Evilsizor, Stephen, Lanchier, Nicolas, Kang, Yun, et al.
Created Date
2016

Need-based transfers (NBTs) are a form of risk-pooling in which binary welfare exchanges occur to preserve the viable participation of individuals in an economy, e.g. reciprocal gifting of cattle among East African herders or food sharing among vampire bats. With the broad goal of better understanding the mathematics of such binary welfare and risk pooling, agent-based simulations are conducted to explore socially optimal transfer policies and sharing network structures, kinetic exchange models that utilize tools from the kinetic theory of gas dynamics are utilized to characterize the wealth distribution of an NBT economy, and a variant of repeated prisoner’s dilemma …

Contributors
Kayser, Kirk, Armbruster, Dieter, Lampert, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2018

I investigate two models interacting agent systems: the first is motivated by the flocking and swarming behaviors in biological systems, while the second models opinion formation in social networks. In each setting, I define natural notions of convergence (to a ``flock" and to a ``consensus'', respectively), and study the convergence properties of each in the limit as $t \rightarrow \infty$. Specifically, I provide sufficient conditions for the convergence of both of the models, and conduct numerical experiments to study the resulting solutions. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Theisen, Ryan, Motsch, Sebastien, Lanchier, Nicholas, et al.
Created Date
2018

This dissertation examines six different models in the field of econophysics using interacting particle systems as the basis of exploration. In each model examined, the underlying structure is a graph G = (V , E ), where each x ∈ V represents an individual who is characterized by the number of coins in her possession at time t. At each time step t, an edge (x, y) ∈ E is chosen at random, resulting in an exchange of coins between individuals x and y according to the rules of the model. Random variables ξt, and ξt(x) keep track of the …

Contributors
Reed, Stephanie J, Lanchier, Nicolas, Smith, Hal, et al.
Created Date
2019

I focus on algorithms that generate good sampling points for function approximation. In 1D, it is well known that polynomial interpolation using equispaced points is unstable. On the other hand, using Chebyshev nodes provides both stable and highly accurate points for polynomial interpolation. In higher dimensional complex regions, optimal sampling points are not known explicitly. This work presents robust algorithms that find good sampling points in complex regions for polynomial interpolation, least-squares, and radial basis function (RBF) methods. The quality of these nodes is measured using the Lebesgue constant. I will also consider optimal sampling for constrained optimization, used to …

Contributors
Liu, Tony, Platte, Rodrigo B, Renaut, Rosemary, et al.
Created Date
2019

The main objective of mathematical modeling is to connect mathematics with other scientific fields. Developing predictable models help to understand the behavior of biological systems. By testing models, one can relate mathematics and real-world experiments. To validate predictions numerically, one has to compare them with experimental data sets. Mathematical modeling can be split into two groups: microscopic and macroscopic models. Microscopic models described the motion of so-called agents (e.g. cells, ants) that interact with their surrounding neighbors. The interactions among these agents form at a large scale some special structures such as flocking and swarming. One of the key questions …

Contributors
Jamous, Sara Sami, Motsch, Sebastien, Armbruster, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2019