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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Doctoral Dissertation
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


In this thesis I introduce a new direction to computing using nonlinear chaotic dynamics. The main idea is rich dynamics of a chaotic system enables us to (1) build better computers that have a flexible instruction set, and (2) carry out computation that conventional computers are not good at it. Here I start from the theory, explaining how one can build a computing logic block using a chaotic system, and then I introduce a new theoretical analysis for chaos computing. Specifically, I demonstrate how unstable periodic orbits and a model based on them explains and predicts how and how well …

Contributors
Kia, Behnam, Ditto, William, Huang, Liang, et al.
Created Date
2011

Situations of sensory overload are steadily becoming more frequent as the ubiquity of technology approaches reality--particularly with the advent of socio-communicative smartphone applications, and pervasive, high speed wireless networks. Although the ease of accessing information has improved our communication effectiveness and efficiency, our visual and auditory modalities--those modalities that today's computerized devices and displays largely engage--have become overloaded, creating possibilities for distractions, delays and high cognitive load; which in turn can lead to a loss of situational awareness, increasing chances for life threatening situations such as texting while driving. Surprisingly, alternative modalities for information delivery have seen little exploration. Touch, …

Contributors
Mcdaniel, Troy Lee, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2012

Multicore processors have proliferated in nearly all forms of computing, from servers, desktop, to smartphones. The primary reason for this large adoption of multicore processors is due to its ability to overcome the power-wall by providing higher performance at a lower power consumption rate. With multi-cores, there is increased need for dynamic energy management (DEM), much more than for single-core processors, as DEM for multi-cores is no more a mechanism just to ensure that a processor is kept under specified temperature limits, but also a set of techniques that manage various processor controls like dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS), …

Contributors
Hanumaiah, Vinay, Vrudhula, Sarma, Chatha, Karamvir, et al.
Created Date
2013

Feature representations for raw data is one of the most important component in a machine learning system. Traditionally, features are \textit{hand crafted} by domain experts which can often be a time consuming process. Furthermore, they do not generalize well to unseen data and novel tasks. Recently, there have been many efforts to generate data-driven representations using clustering and sparse models. This dissertation focuses on building data-driven unsupervised models for analyzing raw data and developing efficient feature representations. Simultaneous segmentation and feature extraction approaches for silicon-pores sensor data are considered. Aggregating data into a matrix and performing low rank and sparse …

Contributors
Sattigeri, Prasanna, Spanias, Andreas, Thornton, Trevor, et al.
Created Date
2014

Stream processing has emerged as an important model of computation especially in the context of multimedia and communication sub-systems of embedded System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures. The dataflow nature of streaming applications allows them to be most naturally expressed as a set of kernels iteratively operating on continuous streams of data. The kernels are computationally intensive and are mainly characterized by real-time constraints that demand high throughput and data bandwidth with limited global data reuse. Conventional architectures fail to meet these demands due to their poorly matched execution models and the overheads associated with instruction and data movements. This work presents StreamWorks, …

Contributors
Panda, Amrit Kumar, Chatha, Karam S., Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2014

Increasing computational demands in data centers require facilities to operate at higher ambient temperatures and at higher power densities. Conventionally, data centers are cooled with electrically-driven vapor-compressor equipment. This paper proposes an alternative data center cooling architecture that is heat-driven. The source is heat produced by the computer equipment. This dissertation details experiments investigating the quantity and quality of heat that can be captured from a liquid-cooled microprocessor on a computer server blade from a data center. The experiments involve four liquid-cooling setups and associated heat-extraction, including a radical approach using mineral oil. The trials examine the feasibility of using …

Contributors
Haywood, Anna, Phelan, Patrick E, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2014

Access Networks provide the backbone to the Internet connecting the end-users to the core network thus forming the most important segment for connectivity. Access Networks have multiple physical layer medium ranging from fiber cables, to DSL links and Wireless nodes, creating practically-used hybrid access networks. We explore the hybrid access network at the Medium ACcess (MAC) Layer which receives packets segregated as data and control packets, thus providing the needed decoupling of data and control plane. We utilize the Software Defined Networking (SDN) principle of centralized processing with segregated data and control plane to further extend the usability of our …

Contributors
Mercian, Anu, Reisslein, Martin, McGarry, Michael P, et al.
Created Date
2015

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) has received significant attention in recent years as major computer companies such as Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Salesforce are adopting this new approach to develop software and systems. Cloud computing is a computing infrastructure to enable rapid delivery of computing resources as a utility in a dynamic, scalable, and virtualized manner. Computer Simulations are widely utilized to analyze the behaviors of software and test them before fully implementations. Simulation can further benefit SaaS application in a cost-effective way taking the advantages of cloud such as customizability, configurability and multi-tendency. This research introduces Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Software-as-Service …

Contributors
Li, Wu, Tsai, Wei-Tek, Sarjoughian, Hessam, et al.
Created Date
2015

Three dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is safe, inexpensive, and has been shown to drastically improve system ease-of-use, diagnostic efficiency, and patient throughput. However, its high computational complexity and resulting high power consumption has precluded its use in hand-held applications. In this dissertation, algorithm-architecture co-design techniques that aim to make hand-held 3-D ultrasound a reality are presented. First, image enhancement methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are proposed. These include virtual source firing techniques and a low overhead digital front-end architecture using orthogonal chirps and orthogonal Golay codes. Second, algorithm-architecture co-design techniques to reduce the power consumption of 3-D SAU imaging systems …

Contributors
Yang, Ming, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2015

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts. The first part studies socially-aware mobile networking and computing. First, it studies random access control and power control under a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework. The socially-aware Nash equilibria (SNEs) are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies mobile crowdsensing under an incentive mechanism that exploits social trust assisted reciprocity (STAR). The efficacy of …

Contributors
Gong, Xiaowen, Zhang, Junshan, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015