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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Although China’s economy has experienced fast growth over the years, it is also characterized by a lack of innovative products and slow development of advanced production technologies. A main reason for this problem is insufficient investments in research and development (R&D) activities by Chinese firms. Because of the potential externality and free-rider effects, the economics literature has long suggested that the private sector tends to underinvest in R&D without governmental interventions. The weak protection of intellectual property rights in China makes the problem of underinvestment in R&D even worse. In this situation, it becomes increasingly important for the government to …

Contributors
Yang, Guisheng, Hwang, Yuhchang, Wang, Tan, et al.
Created Date
2015

The Chinese capital market is characterized by high segmentation due to governmental regulations. In this thesis I investigate both the causes and consequences of this market segmentations. Specifically, I address the following questions: (1) to which degree this capital market segmentation is caused by the fragmented regulations in China, (2) what are the key characteristics of this market segmentation, and (3) what are the impacts of this market segmentation on capital costs and resources allocations. Answers to these questions can have important implications for Chinese policy makers to improve capital market regulatory coordination and efficiency. I organize this thesis as …

Contributors
Jia, Shaojun, Hwang, Yuhchang, Chen, Hong, et al.
Created Date
2015