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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




In recent years, the field of nanomedicine has progressed at an astonishing rate, particularly with respect to applications in cancer treatment and molecular imaging. Although organic systems have been the frontrunners, inorganic systems have also begun to show promise, especially those based upon silica and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). Many of these systems are being designed for simultaneous therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities, thus coining the term, theranostics. A unique class of inorganic systems that shows great promise as theranostics is that of layered double hydroxides (LDH). By synthesis of a core/shell structures, e.g. a gold nanoparticle (NP) core and LDH shell, …

Contributors
Rearick, Colton, Dey, Sandwip K, Krause, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2011

High photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields reported from amorphous (a-Si) and crystalline (c-Si) nanoparticles have opened up lots of possibilities for use of silicon in optical applications such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), photonics and solar cells with added processing and cost benefits. However, the PL response and the mechanisms behind it are highly dependent on the matrix in which the nanoparticles are grown and on the growth method. While, the bottom-up approach for deposition of free standing nanoparticles seem to be perfectly suited for large area deposition for LED and solar cell applications, the dominant growth techniques (laser ablation and …

Contributors
Garg, Prateek, Holman, Zachary C, Zhang, Yong H, et al.
Created Date
2015

Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly present in our environment. Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), defined as objects that measure less than 100 nanometers in at least one dimension, are being integrated into commercial products because of their small size, increased surface area, and quantum effects. These special properties have made ENPs antimicrobial agents in clothing and plastics, among other applications in industries such as pharmaceuticals, renewable energy, and prosthetics. This thesis incorporates investigations into both application of nanoparticles into polymers as well as implications of nanoparticle release into the environment. First, the integration of ENPs into polymer fibers via electrospinning was explored. Electrospinning …

Contributors
Hoogesteijn von Reitzenstein, Natalia, Westerhoff, Paul, Herckes, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2015

Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are substantially different from their bulk counterparts. These unique properties have gained recognition and application for various fields and products including sensors, displays, photovoltaics, and energy storage devices. Aerosol Deposition (AD) is a relatively new method for depositing nanomaterials. AD utilizes a nozzle to accelerate the nanomaterial into a deposition chamber under near-vacuum conditions towards a substrate with which the nanomaterial collides and adheres. Traditional methods for designing nozzles at atmospheric conditions are not well suited for nozzle design for AD methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, ANSYS Fluent, is utilized to simulate two-phase flows …

Contributors
Hoffman, Trent, Holman, Zachary C, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2017

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability worldwide with 1.7 million TBIs reported annually in the United States. Broadly, TBI can be classified into focal injury, associated with cerebral contusion, and diffuse injury, a widespread injury pathology. TBI results in a host of pathological alterations and may lead to a transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown. Although the BBB dysfunction after TBI may provide a window for therapeutic delivery, the current drug delivery approaches remains largely inefficient due to rapid clearance, inactivation and degradation. One potential strategy to address the current therapeutic limitations is to employ nanoparticle (NP)-based technology …

Contributors
Bharadwaj, Vimala Nagabhushana, Stabenfeldt, Sarah E, Kodibagkar, Vikram D, et al.
Created Date
2018