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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Scientific evidence strongly indicates that there are significant health benefits of breastfeeding. Lower breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity rates are found in vulnerable populations particularly among women of low socioeconomic status, and racial minorities such as immigrant, racial, and minority cultural groups. Breastfeeding disparities can contribute to negative health outcomes for the mothers, and their infants, and families. Muslim Arab immigrants are a fast-growing, under-studied, and underserved minority population in the United States. Little is known about breastfeeding practices and challenges facing this vulnerable population. Immigrant Muslim Arab mothers encounter breastfeeding challenges related to religion, language, different cultural beliefs, levels …

Contributors
Khasawneh, Wafa, Komnenich, Pauline, Petrov, Megan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cancer survivors engaged in either six-week Internet-delivered mindfulness training or a usual-care control and were compared on the following outcome battery: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Profile of Mood States, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Assessments were conducted before and after treatment and intervention compliance was monitored. Mindfulness treatments were delivered at a time and on a computer of the participants’ choosing. Multivariate analysis indicated that mindfulness training produced significant benefits on all measures (p < .05). Online mindfulness instruction represents a widely-accessible, cost-effective intervention for reducing psychological distress and its behavioral manifestations …

Contributors
Messer, David Elias, Horan, John J, Homer, Judith, et al.
Created Date
2017

ABSTRACT The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of the U.S. population, and is expected to grow to 21% by 2040. As the adults age, they are at risk for developing chronic illness and disability. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, and almost 80% of these are 65 years and older. The prevalence of heart failure will increase with the increase in aging population, thus increasing the costs associated …

Contributors
Thakur, Ramesh Devi, Fleury, Julie, Shearer, Nelma, et al.
Created Date
2017

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most common chronic diseases in youth and it has been shown that adolescents have the worst glycemic control of any age group. The objective of this study was to develop, test and evaluate the feasibility of an online intervention (Can-Do-Tude) that uses the principles of motivational interviewing (MI) to deliver tailored diabetes self-management education to adolescents with T1D. Bandura’s efficacy belief system was used to guide the design of this study. The study used a multi-phase, multi-method approach. The first phase (alpha) of this study was a qualitative descriptive design to examine …

Contributors
Paul, Linda Louise, Komnenich, Pauline, Spezia Faulkner, Melissa, et al.
Created Date
2017

The physical environment influences the physiology, psychology, and the societal interactions of those who experience it. The environment can also influence human behavior. Critical care nurses are in constant interaction with the physical environment surrounding their patients. High acuity ICU patients are vulnerable and at risk for harm, infection, and poor outcomes while the physical and cognitive workload of nurses presents a demanding and continuous challenge. The goal of this qualitative study was to explore and understand the way critical care nurses navigate within the patient room and interact with its features. The study of critical care nurses interacting with …

Contributors
Hamilton, D. Kirk, Lamb, Gerri, Fleury, Julie, et al.
Created Date
2017

This body of research sought to explore relationships between parenting practices, physical activity resources, and Hispanic children’s physical activity. Guided by the Family Ecological Model (FEM) and the Ecological Model of Physical Activity (EMPA) this study examined the influence of parents on children’s physical activity through an integrative review. A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate potential relationships between parental perception safety at school, gender, and children’s physical activity. A cross sectional study was also utilized to examine potential correlations between parenting practices, physical activity resources, and children’s physical activity. Parental role modeling of physical activity and parental support …

Contributors
Hutchens, Amy, Lee, Rebecca E, Todd, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2017

ABSTRACT This qualitative descriptive study described caregiver recognition of personal and social contextual resources guiding purposeful participation in self-care and well-being. This research builds on health empowerment theory, which conceptualizes health empowerment as an inherent, relational and ongoing process, expressive of health patterning of well-being (Shearer, 2009). By 2060, Americans 65 years and older will number nearly 98 million, more than double that in 2013. The number of older adults aged 85 and older will double from 6 million in 2003, to 14.6 million by 2040 (Health & Human Services, 2014). Sixty-five million adults serve as informal caregivers, many themselves …

Contributors
Blank, Laura Jeanne, Fleury, Julie, Kommenich, Pauline, et al.
Created Date
2018

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. While physical activity can reduce CVD risk, most adults do not engage in adequate physical activity to maintain or improve health. Older adults are less likely to participate in physical activity and experience a greater burden of CVD compared to younger adults. Despite knowledge of motivators and barriers to physical activity, the challenge to reduce cardiovascular risk in the older adult population remains unmet. Older adults face unique and complex barriers to physical activity, including limited social contextual resources and behavioral change processes. Interventions to enhance wellness motivation …

Contributors
Barrows, Jennifer, Fleury, Julie, Komnenich, Pauline, et al.
Created Date
2018

Sedentary behavior has recently been recognized as a widespread, independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality from chronic conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Midlife women (age 40-64) are known to have high levels of sedentary behavior and corresponding cardiovascular disease risk. Currently, little is known about mechanisms involved in reducing and maintaining reductions to sedentary behavior in midlife women. Theory-based nursing interventions are needed which reflect process, personal meaning, person-environment interaction, and incorporate a strength-based perspective. Wellness Motivation Theory guided the research, conceptualizing behavioral change processes within culturally and environmentally relevant contexts, while recognizing bidirectional influences of …

Contributors
Sherman, Tanie Maurine, Fleury, Julie, Belyea, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2018

Nurses are ideally positioned to lead the transformation of healthcare delivery in the United States, however they must be prepared to do so. The Institute of Medicine has called for nurses to become change agents and assume leadership positions across all levels in order to become full partners with physicians and other health care providers. While clinical leadership is a responsibility for all nurses, expectations for new nurse clinical leadership have not been well studied. This study sought to determine the nursing leadership competencies clinical managers expect of new nurses in an acute care setting and to identify gaps between …

Contributors
Miehl, Nickolaus James, Komnenich, Pauline, Hagler, Debra, et al.
Created Date
2018