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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Tissue approximation and repair have been performed with sutures and staples for centuries, but these means are inherently traumatic. Tissue repair using laser-responsive nanomaterials can lead to rapid tissue sealing and repair and is an attractive alternative to existing clinical methods. Laser tissue welding is a sutureless technique for sealing incised or wounded tissue, where chromophores convert laser light to heat to induce in tissue sealing. Introducing chromophores that absorb near-infrared light creates differential laser absorption and allows for laser wavelengths that minimizes tissue damage. In this work, plasmonic nanocomposites have been synthesized and used in laser tissue welding for …

Contributors
Urie, Russell Ricks, Rege, Kaushal, Acharya, Abhinav, et al.
Created Date
2019

I examined how competition affects the way animals use thermal resources to control their body temperature. Currently, biologists use a cost benefit analysis to predict how animals should regulate their body temperature. This current theory of thermoregulation does not adequately predict how animals thermoregulate in the wild. While the model works well for animals in low cost habitats, it does not work as well for animals in high cost habitats. For example, animals that are in habitats of low thermal quality thermoregulate more precisely than predicted by the current model. One reason these predictions may be wrong is that they …

Contributors
Borchert, Jason, Angilletta Jr., Michael, Pratt, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Desert environments provide considerable challenges to organisms because of high temperatures and limited food and water resources. Accordingly, desert species have behavioral and physiological traits that enable them to cope with these constraints. However, continuing human activity as well as anticipated further changes to the climate and the vegetative community pose a great challenge to such balance between an organism and its environment. This is especially true in the Arabian Desert, where climate conditions are extreme and environmental disturbances substantial. This study combined laboratory and field components to enhance our understanding of dhub (Uromastyx aegyptius) ecophysiology and determine whether habitat …

Contributors
Al-Sayegh, Mohammed Taher, DeNardo, Dale, Angilletta, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2017

Many animals thermoregulate to maximize performance. However, interactions with other animals, such as competitors or predators, limit access to preferred microclimates. For instance, an animal may thermoregulate poorly when fighting rivals or avoiding predators. However, the distribution of thermal resources should influence how animals perceive and respond to risk. When thermal resources are concentrated in space, individuals compete for access, which presumably reduces the thermoregulatory performance while making their location more predictable to predators. Conversely, when thermal resources are dispersed, several individuals can thermoregulate effectively without occupying the same area. Nevertheless, interactions with competitors or predators impose a potent stress, …

Contributors
Rusch, Travis, Angilletta, Michael, Sears, Mike, et al.
Created Date
2017

In species with highly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the degradation of one of the sex chromosomes can result in unequal gene expression between the sexes (e.g., between XX females and XY males) and between the sex chromosomes and the autosomes. Dosage compensation is a process whereby genes on the sex chromosomes achieve equal gene expression which prevents deleterious side effects from having too much or too little expression of genes on sex chromsomes. The green anole is part of a group of species that recently underwent an adaptive radiation. The green anole has XX/XY sex determination, but the content of the …

Contributors
Rupp, Shawn Michael, Wilson Sayres, Melissa A, Kusumi, Kenro, et al.
Created Date
2016

There is considerable recent interest in the dynamic nature of immune function in the context of an animal’s internal and external environment. An important focus within this field of ecoimmunology is on how availability of resources such as energy can alter immune function. Water is an additional resource that drives animal development, physiology, and behavior, yet the influence hydration has on immunity has received limited attention. In particular, hydration state may have the greatest potential to drive fluctuations in immunity and other physiological functions in species that live in water-limited environments where they may experience periods of dehydration. To shed …

Contributors
Moeller, Karla, DeNardo, Dale, Angilletta, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2016