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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The larger tolerance to lattice mismatch in growth of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) offers much more flexibility for achieving a wide range of compositions and bandgaps via alloying within a single substrate. The bandgap of III-V InGaAsP alloy NWs can be tuned to cover a wide range of (0.4, 2.25) eV, appealing for various optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors, solar cells, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), lasers, etc., given the existing rich knowledge in device fabrication based on these materials. This dissertation explores the growth of InGaAsP alloys using a low-cost method that could be potentially important especially for III-V NW-based solar …

Contributors
Hashemi Amiri, Seyed Ebrahim, Ning, Cun-Zheng, Petuskey, William, et al.
Created Date
2018

The energy band gap of a semiconductor material critically influences the operating wavelength of an optoelectronic device. Realization of any desired band gap, or even spatially graded band gaps, is important for applications such as lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and detectors. Compared to thin films, nanowires offer greater flexibility for achieving a variety of alloy compositions. Furthermore, the nanowire geometry permits simultaneous incorporation of a wide range of compositions on a single substrate. Such controllable alloy composition variation can be realized either within an individual nanowire or between distinct nanowires across a substrate. This dissertation explores the control …

Contributors
Nichols, Patricia, Ning, Cun-Zheng, Carpenter, Ray, et al.
Created Date
2012

This thesis summarizes the research work carried out on design, modeling and simulation of semiconductor nanophotonic devices. The research includes design of nanowire (NW) lasers, modeling of active plasmonic waveguides, design of plasmonic nano-lasers, and design of all-semiconductor plasmonic systems. For the NW part, a comparative study of electrical injection in the longitudinal p-i-n and coaxial p-n core-shell NWs was performed. It is found that high density carriers can be efficiently injected into and confined in the core-shell structure. The required bias voltage and doping concentrations in the core-shell structure are smaller than those in the longitudinal p-i-n structure. A …

Contributors
Li, Debin, Ning, Cun-Zheng, Zhang, Yong-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2012

Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are one dimensional materials and have size quantization effect when the diameter is sufficiently small. They can serve as optical wave guides along the length direction and contain optically active gain at the same time. Due to these unique properties, NWs are now very promising and extensively studied for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. A systematic and comprehensive optical and microstructural study of several important infrared semiconductor NWs is presented in this thesis, which includes InAs, PbS, InGaAs, erbium chloride silicate and erbium silicate. Micro-photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized in conjunction to characterize the optical …

Contributors
Sun, Minghua, Ning, Cun-Zheng, Yu, Hongbin, et al.
Created Date
2011