Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Tracking a time-varying number of targets is a challenging dynamic state estimation problem whose complexity is intensified under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or high clutter conditions. This is important, for example, when tracking multiple, closely spaced targets moving in the same direction such as a convoy of low observable vehicles moving through a forest or multiple targets moving in a crisscross pattern. The SNR in these applications is usually low as the reflected signals from the targets are weak or the noise level is very high. An effective approach for detecting and tracking a single target under low SNR conditions …

Contributors
Ebenezer, Samuel P., Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2015

Genomic and proteomic sequences, which are in the form of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and amino acids respectively, play a vital role in the structure, function and diversity of every living cell. As a result, various genomic and proteomic sequence processing methods have been proposed from diverse disciplines, including biology, chemistry, physics, computer science and electrical engineering. In particular, signal processing techniques were applied to the problems of sequence querying and alignment, that compare and classify regions of similarity in the sequences based on their composition. However, although current approaches obtain results that can be attributed to key biological properties, they …

Contributors
Ravichandran, Lakshminarayan, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Spanias, Andreas S, et al.
Created Date
2011