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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2017 2019


Synthetic manipulation of chromatin dynamics has applications for medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. However, progress in this area requires the identification of design rules for engineering chromatin systems. In this thesis, I discuss research that has elucidated the intrinsic properties of histone binding proteins (HBP), and apply this knowledge to engineer novel chromatin binding effectors. Results from the experiments described herein demonstrate that the histone binding domain from chromobox protein homolog 8 (CBX8) is portable and can be customized to alter its endogenous function. First, I developed an assay to identify engineered fusion proteins that bind histone post translational modifications (PTMs) …

Contributors
Tekel, Stefan, Haynes, Karmella, Mills, Jeremy, et al.
Created Date
2019

The research question explored in this thesis is how CRISPR mediated editing is influenced by artificially opened chromatin in cells. Closed chromatin poses a barrier to Cas9 binding and editing at target genes. Synthetic pioneer factors (PFs) are a promising new approach to artificially open condensed heterochromatin allowing greater access of target DNA to Cas9. The Haynes lab has constructed fusions of enzymatic chromatin-modifying domains designed to remodel chromatin and increase Cas9 editing efficiency. With a library of PFs available, this research focuses on analyzing the behavior of Cas9 in chromatin that has been artificially opened by PFs. The types …

Contributors
Hamna, Syeda Fatima, Haynes, Karmella A, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, et al.
Created Date
2019

Calcium imaging is a well-established, non-invasive or minimally technique designed to study the electrical signaling neurons. Calcium regulates the release of gliotransmitters in astrocytes. Analyzing astrocytic calcium transients can provide significant insights into mechanisms such as neuroplasticity and neural signal modulation. In the past decade, numerous methods have been developed to analyze in-vivo calcium imaging data that involves complex techniques such as overlapping signals segregation and motion artifact correction. The hypothesis used to detect calcium signal is the spatiotemporal sparsity of calcium signal, and these methods are unable to identify the passive cells that are not actively firing during the …

Contributors
Bhandarkar, Siddhi Umesh, Brafman, David, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, et al.
Created Date
2019

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are defined by the loss of several types of neurons and glial cells within the central nervous system (CNS). Combatting these diseases requires a robust population of relevant cell types that can be employed in cell therapies, drug screening, or patient specific disease modeling. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have the ability to self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into the various neuronal and glial cell types of the CNS. In order to realize the potential of hNPCs, it is necessary to develop a xeno-free …

Contributors
Morgan, Daylin, Brafman, David, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, et al.
Created Date
2018

Alzheimer’s disease is a major problem affecting over 5.7 million Americans. Although much is known about the effects of this neurogenerative disease, the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. One very important characteristic of Alzheimer’s is the accumulation of beta amyloid protein which often results in plaques. To understand these beta amyloid proteins better, antibody fragments may be used to bind to these oligomers and potentially reduce the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. This thesis focused on the expression and crystallization the fragment antigen binding antibody fragment A4. A fragment antigen binding fragment was chosen to be worked with as it is …

Contributors
Colasurd, Paige, Nannenga, Brent, Mills, Jeremy, et al.
Created Date
2018

Muscular weakness is a common manifestation for Stroke survivors and for patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction leading to reduced functional independence, especially mobility. Several rigid orthotic devices are being designed to assist mobility. However, limitations in majority of these devices are: 1) that they are constrained only to level walking applications, 2) are mostly bulky and rigid lacking user comfort. For these reasons, rehabilitation using soft-robotics can serve as a powerful modality in gait assistance and potentially accelerate functional recovery. The characteristics of soft robotic exosuit is that it’s more flexible, delivers high power to weight ratio, and conforms …

Contributors
Muthukrishnan, Niveditha, Polygerinos, Panagiotis, Lockhart, Thurmon, et al.
Created Date
2018

Early detection and treatment of disease is paramount for improving human health and wellness. Micro-scale devices promote new opportunities for the rapid, cost-effective, and accurate identification of altered biological states indicative of disease early-onset; these devices function at a scale more sensitive to numerous biological processes. The application of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in biomedical settings has recently emerged and flourished over course of the last two decades, requiring a deep understanding of material biocompatibility, biosensing sensitively/selectively, biological constraints for artificial tissue/organ replacement, and the regulations in place to ensure device safety. Capitalizing on the inherent physical differences between cancerous and …

Contributors
Podlevsky, Jennie Hewitt Appel, Chae, Junseok, Goryll, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2018

Glucose sensors have had many paradigm shifts, beginning with using urine, to point of care blood, now being approved for implant. This review covers various aspects of the sensors, ranging from the types of surface chemistry, and electron transduction. All the way to the algorithms, and filters used to alter and understand the signal being transduced. Focus is given to Dr. Hellerâ’s work using redox mediators, as well as Dr. Sode in his advances for direct electron transfer. Simple process of designing sensors are described, as well as the possible errors that may come with glucose sensor use. Finally, a …

Contributors
Probst, David L, LaBelle, Jeffery, Caplan, Micheal, et al.
Created Date
2018

The ultimate goal of human movement control research is to understand how natural movements performed in daily reaching activities, are controlled. Natural movements require coordination of multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) of the arm. Patterns of arm joint control were studied during daily functional tasks, which were performed through the rotation of seven DOF in the arm. Analyzed movements which imitated the following 3 activities of daily living: moving an empty soda can from a table and placing it on a further position; placing the empty soda can from initial position at table to a position at shoulder level on …

Contributors
Sansgiri, Dattaraj, Dounskaia, Natalia, Schaefer, Sydney, et al.
Created Date
2018

Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the U.S., accounting for nearly 140,000 deaths per year. Heart transplantation and implantation of mechanical assist devices are the options of last resort for intractable heart failure, but these are limited by lack of organ donors and potential surgical complications. In this regard, there is an urgent need for developing new effective therapeutic strategies to induce regeneration and restore the loss contractility of infarcted myocardium. Over the past decades, regenerative medicine has emerged as a promising strategy to develop scaffold-free cell therapies and scaffold-based cardiac patches as potential …

Contributors
Navaei, Ali, Nikkhah, Mehdi, Brafman, David, et al.
Created Date
2018