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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Electronic devices are gaining an increasing market share in the medical field. Medical devices are becoming more sophisticated, and encompassing more applications. Unlike consumer electronics, medical devices have far more limitations when it comes to area, power and most importantly reliability. The medical devices industry has recently seen the advantages of using Flash memory instead of Read Only Memory (ROM) for firmware storage, and in some cases to replace Electrically Programmable Read Only Memories (EEPROMs) in medical devices for frequent data storage. There are direct advantages to using Flash memory instead of Read Only Memory, most importantly the fact that …

Contributors
Hag, Eslam E., Kozicki, Michael N, Schroder, Dieter K, et al.
Created Date
2010

Chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials have gained wide attention because of their applications in conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM), phase change memories (PC-RAM), optical rewritable disks (CD-RW and DVD-RW), microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), microfluidics, and optical communications. One of the significant properties of ChG materials is the change in the resistivity of the material when a metal such as Ag or Cu is added to it by diffusion. This study demonstrates the potential radiation-sensing capabilities of two metal/chalcogenide glass device configurations. Lateral and vertical device configurations sense the radiation-induced migration of Ag+ ions in germanium selenide glasses via changes in electrical …

Contributors
Dandamudi, Pradeep, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh J, et al.
Created Date
2013

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology employs the mechanisms of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes (SE) and electrochemical redox reactions in order to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias is applied to an anode opposite to a cathode, atoms at the anode are oxidized to ions and dissolve into the SE. Under the influence of the electric field, the ions move to the cathode and become reduced to form the electrodeposits. These electrodeposits are filamentary in nature and persistent, and since they are metallic can alter the physical characteristics of the material on which they are formed. PMCs can …

Contributors
Yu, Weijie, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh, et al.
Created Date
2015

Total dose sensing systems (or radiation detection systems) have many applications, ranging from survey monitors used to supervise the generated radioactive waste at nuclear power plants to personal dosimeters which measure the radiation dose accumulated in individuals. This dissertation work will present two different types of novel devices developed at Arizona State University for total dose sensing applications. The first detector technology is a mechanically flexible metal-chalcogenide glass (ChG) based system which is fabricated on low cost substrates and are intended as disposable total dose sensors. Compared to existing commercial technologies, these thin film radiation sensors are simpler in form …

Contributors
Mahmud, Adnan, Barnaby, Hugh J., Kozicki, Michael N, et al.
Created Date
2017

Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) devices are, in essence, redox-based solid-state resistive switching devices that rely on ion transport through a solid electrolyte (SE) layer from anode to cathode. Analysis and modeling of the effect of different fabrication and processing parameter/conditions on PMC devices are crucial for future electronics. Furthermore, this work is even more significant for devices utilizing back-end- of-line (BEOL) compatible materials such as Cu, W, their oxides and SiOx as these devices offer cost effectiveness thanks to their inherent foundry-ready nature. In this dissertation, effect of annealing conditions and cathode material on the performance of Cu-SiOx vertical devices …

Contributors
Balaban, Mehmet Bugra, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh J, et al.
Created Date
2020