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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a technology platform which utilizes mass transport in solid or liquid electrolyte coupled with electrochemical (redox) reactions to form or remove nanoscale metallic electrodeposits on or in the electrolyte. The ability to redistribute metal mass and form metallic nanostructure in or on a structure in situ, via the application of a bias on laterally placed electrodes, creates a large number of promising applications. A novel PMC-based lateral microwave switch was fabricated and characterized for use in microwave systems. It has demonstrated low insertion loss, high isolation, low voltage operation, low power and low energy consumption, …

Contributors
Ren, Minghan, Kozicki, Michael, Schroder, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2011

As existing solar cell technologies come closer to their theoretical efficiency, new concepts that overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit and exceed 50% efficiency need to be explored. New materials systems are often investigated to achieve this, but the use of existing solar cell materials in advanced concept approaches is compelling for multiple theoretical and practical reasons. In order to include advanced concept approaches into existing materials, nanostructures are used as they alter the physical properties of these materials. To explore advanced nanostructured concepts with existing materials such as III-V alloys, silicon and/or silicon/germanium and associated alloys, fundamental aspects of using these …

Contributors
Dahal, Som Nath, Honsberg, Christiana, Goodnick, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2011

Photodetectors in the 1.7 to 4.0 μm range are being commercially developed on InP substrates to meet the needs of longer wavelength applications such as thermal and medical sensing. Currently, these devices utilize high indium content metamorphic Ga1-xInxAs (x > 0.53) layers to extend the wavelength range beyond the 1.7 μm achievable using lattice matched GaInAs. The large lattice mismatch required to reach the extended wavelengths results in photodetector materials that contain a large number of misfit dislocations. The low quality of these materials results in a large nonradiative Shockley Read Hall generation/recombination rate that is manifested as an undesirable …

Contributors
Sharma, Ankur Ramesh, Johnson, Shane, Goryll, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2013

As crystalline silicon solar cells continue to get thinner, the recombination of carriers at the surfaces of the cell plays an ever-important role in controlling the cell efficiency. One tool to minimize surface recombination is field effect passivation from the charges present in the thin films applied on the cell surfaces. The focus of this work is to understand the properties of charges present in the SiNx films and then to develop a mechanism to manipulate the polarity of charges to either negative or positive based on the end-application. Specific silicon-nitrogen dangling bonds (·Si-N), known as K center defects, are …

Contributors
Sharma, Vivek, Bowden, Stuart, Schroder, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2013

Increasing the conversion efficiencies of photovoltaic (PV) cells beyond the single junction theoretical limit is the driving force behind much of third generation solar cell research. Over the last half century, the experimental conversion efficiency of both single junction and tandem solar cells has plateaued as manufacturers and researchers have optimized various materials and structures. While existing materials and technologies have remarkably good conversion efficiencies, they are approaching their own limits. For example, tandem solar cells are currently well developed commercially but further improvements through increasing the number of junctions struggle with various issues related to material interfacial defects. Thus, …

Contributors
Lee, Jongwon, Honsberg, Christiana B, Bowden, Stuart, et al.
Created Date
2014

Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is an attractive II-VI compound semiconductor with a direct bandgap of 2.26 eV that is used in many applications in optoelectronic devices. Compared to the two dimensional (2D) thin-film semiconductors, one-dimensional (1D) nanowires can have different electronic properties for potential novel applications. In this work, we present the study of ZnTe nanowires (NWs) that are synthesized through a simple vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. By controlling the presence or the absence of Au catalysts and controlling the growth parameters such as growth temperature, various growth morphologies of ZnTe, such as thin films and nanowires can be obtained. The characterization …

Contributors
Peng, Jhih-Hong, Yu, Hongbin, Roedel, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2017