Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


The dynamics of a fluid flow inside 2D square and 3D cubic cavities under various configurations were simulated and analyzed using a spectral code I developed. This code was validated against known studies in the 3D lid-driven cavity. It was then used to explore the various dynamical behaviors close to the onset of instability of the steady-state flow, and explain in the process the mechanism underlying an intermittent bursting previously observed. A fairly complete bifurcation picture emerged, using a combination of computational tools such as selective frequency damping, edge-state tracking and subspace restriction. The code was then used to investigate …

Contributors
Wu, Ke, Lopez, Juan, Welfert, Bruno, et al.
Created Date
2019

A continuously and stably stratified fluid contained in a square cavity subjected to harmonic body forcing is studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. Complex dynamics are observed near the onset of instability of the basic state, which is a flow configuration that is always an exact analytical solution of the governing equations. The instability of the basic state to perturbations is first studied with linear stability analysis (Floquet analysis), revealing a multitude of intersecting synchronous and subharmonic resonance tongues in parameter space. A modal reduction method for determining the locus of basic state instability is …

Contributors
Yalim, Jason, Welfert, Bruno D., Lopez, Juan M., et al.
Created Date
2019

Earth-system models describe the interacting components of the climate system and technological systems that affect society, such as communication infrastructures. Data assimilation addresses the challenge of state specification by incorporating system observations into the model estimates. In this research, a particular data assimilation technique called the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) is applied to the ionosphere, which is a domain of practical interest due to its effects on infrastructures that depend on satellite communication and remote sensing. This dissertation consists of three main studies that propose strategies to improve space- weather specification during ionospheric extreme events, but are generally …

Contributors
Durazo, Juan Alberto, Kostelich, Eric J., Mahalov, Alex, et al.
Created Date
2018

Inverse problems model real world phenomena from data, where the data are often noisy and models contain errors. This leads to instabilities, multiple solution vectors and thus ill-posedness. To solve ill-posed inverse problems, regularization is typically used as a penalty function to induce stability and allow for the incorporation of a priori information about the desired solution. In this thesis, high order regularization techniques are developed for image and function reconstruction from noisy or misleading data. Specifically the incorporation of the Polynomial Annihilation operator allows for the accurate exploitation of the sparse representation of each function in the edge domain. …

Contributors
Scarnati, Theresa Ann, Gelb, Anne, Platte, Rodrigo, et al.
Created Date
2018

The tools developed for the use of investigating dynamical systems have provided critical understanding to a wide range of physical phenomena. Here these tools are used to gain further insight into scalar transport, and how it is affected by mixing. The aim of this research is to investigate the efficiency of several different partitioning methods which demarcate flow fields into dynamically distinct regions, and the correlation of finite-time statistics from the advection-diffusion equation to these regions. For autonomous systems, invariant manifold theory can be used to separate the system into dynamically distinct regions. Despite there being no equivalent method for …

Contributors
Walker, Phillip, Tang, Wenbo, Kostelich, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2018

The three-dimensional flow contained in a rapidly rotating circular split cylinder is studied numerically solving the Navier--Stokes equations. The cylinder is completely filled with fluid and is split at the midplane. Three different types of boundary conditions were imposed, leading to a variety of instabilities and complex flow dynamics. The first configuration has a strong background rotation and a small differential rotation between the two halves. The axisymmetric flow was first studied identifying boundary layer instabilities which produce inertial waves under some conditions. Limit cycle states and quasiperiodic states were found, including some period doubling bifurcations. Then, a three-dimensional study …

Contributors
Gutierrez Castillo, Paloma, Lopez, Juan M., Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2017

Finite element simulations modeling the hydrodynamic impact loads subjected to an elastomeric coating were performed to develop an understanding of the performance and failure mechanisms of protective coatings for cavitating environments. In this work, two major accomplishments were achieved: 1) scaling laws were developed from hydrodynamic principles and numerical simulations to allow conversion of measured distributions of pressure peaks in a cavitating flow to distributions of microscopic impact loadings modeling individual bubble collapse events, and 2) a finite strain, thermo-mechanical material model for polyurea-based elastomers was developed using a logarithmic rate formulation and implemented into an explicit finite element code. …

Contributors
Liao, Xiao, Oswald, Jay, Liu, Yongming, et al.
Created Date
2016

Chapter 1 introduces some key elements of important topics such as; quantum mechanics, representation theory of the Lorentz and Poincare groups, and a review of some basic rela- ´ tivistic wave equations that will play an important role in the work to follow. In Chapter 2, a complex covariant form of the classical Maxwell’s equations in a moving medium or at rest is introduced. In addition, a compact, Lorentz invariant, form of the energy-momentum tensor is derived. In chapter 3, the concept of photon helicity is critically analyzed and its connection with the Pauli-Lubanski vector from the viewpoint of the …

Contributors
Lanfear, Nathan A., Suslov, Sergei, Kotschwar, Brett, et al.
Created Date
2016

Divergence-free vector field interpolants properties are explored on uniform and scattered nodes, and also their application to fluid flow problems. These interpolants may be applied to physical problems that require the approximant to have zero divergence, such as the velocity field in the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the magnetic and electric fields in the Maxwell's equations. In addition, the methods studied here are meshfree, and are suitable for problems defined on complex domains, where mesh generation is computationally expensive or inaccurate, or for problems where the data is only available at scattered locations. The contributions of this work include a …

Contributors
Araujo Mitrano, Arthur, Platte, Rodrigo, Wright, Grady, et al.
Created Date
2016

High-order methods are known for their accuracy and computational performance when applied to solving partial differential equations and have widespread use in representing images compactly. Nonetheless, high-order methods have difficulty representing functions containing discontinuities or functions having slow spectral decay in the chosen basis. Certain sensing techniques such as MRI and SAR provide data in terms of Fourier coefficients, and thus prescribe a natural high-order basis. The field of compressed sensing has introduced a set of techniques based on $\ell^1$ regularization that promote sparsity and facilitate working with functions having discontinuities. In this dissertation, high-order methods and $\ell^1$ regularization are …

Contributors
Denker, Dennis, Gelb, Anne, Archibald, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2016