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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Thousands of high-resolution images are generated each day. Segmenting, classifying, and analyzing the contents of these images are the key steps in image understanding. This thesis focuses on image segmentation and classification and its applications in synthetic, texture, natural, biomedical, and industrial images. A robust level-set-based multi-region and texture image segmentation approach is proposed in this thesis to tackle most of the challenges in the existing multi-region segmentation methods, including computational complexity and sensitivity to initialization. Medical image analysis helps in understanding biological processes and disease pathologies. In this thesis, two cell evolution analysis schemes are proposed for cell cluster …

Contributors
Said, Asaad F., Karam, Lina, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2010

The existing compact models can reproduce the characteristics of MOSFETs in the temperature range of -40oC to 125oC. Some applications require circuits to operate over a wide temperature range consisting of temperatures below the specified range of existing compact models, requiring wide temperature range compact models for the design of such circuits. In order to develop wide temperature range compact models, fourteen different geometries of n-channel and p-channel MOSFETs manufactured in a 0.18μm mixed-signal process were electrically characterized over a temperature range of 40 K to 298 K. Electrical characterization included ID-VG and ID-VD under different drain, body and gate …

Contributors
Kathuria, Achal, Barnaby, Hugh, Schroder, Dieter K, et al.
Created Date
2010

Many methods have been proposed to estimate power system small signal stability, for either analysis or control, through identification of modal frequencies and their damping levels. Generally, estimation methods have been employed to assess small signal stability from collected field measurements. However, the challenge to using these methods in assessing field measurements is their ability to accurately estimate stability in the presence of noise. In this thesis a new method is developed which estimates the modal content of simulated and actual field measurements using orthogonal polynomials and the results are compared to other commonly used estimators. This new method estimates …

Contributors
Kokanos, Barrie Lee, Karady, George G, Heydt, Gerald, et al.
Created Date
2010

To establish reliable wireless communication links it is critical to devise schemes to mitigate the effects of the fading channel. In this regard, this dissertation analyzes two types of systems: point-to-point, and multiuser systems. For point-to-point systems with multiple antennas, switch and stay diversity combining offers a substantial complexity reduction for a modest loss in performance as compared to systems that implement selection diversity. For the first time, the design and performance of space-time coded multiple antenna systems that employ switch and stay combining at the receiver is considered. Novel switching algorithms are proposed and upper bounds on the pairwise …

Contributors
Bangalore Narasimhamurthy, Adarsh, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, Duman, Tolga M, et al.
Created Date
2010

This thesis examines the modeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analysis. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite elementmethods are needed formore precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicles static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicles trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal …

Contributors
Korad, Akshay Shashikumar, Rodriguez, Armando A, Tsakalis, Konstantinos S, et al.
Created Date
2010