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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This study was designed to influence consumer habits, specifically those relating to purchases of fruits, vegetables, and junk food. Previous studies have clearly shown the ineffectiveness of simply describing the health benefits of eating more fruits and vegetables (F/V). In contrast, this study aimed to change the result by changing the message: providing participants with insight into the hidden agendas of food companies and grocery stores, provide useful tips on how to include children when selecting F/V, and emphasizing the importance of parental modeling in regard to food purchases. Participants of this study were separated into two groups, the tour …

Contributors
Kinsfather, Diana Llelven, Johnston, Carol, Hekler, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2013

Many scholars agree that heritage tourism has grown in recent years. It has become a unique way for communities to diversify their economies while preserving local culture and heritage. One unique way communities are doing this is through heritage festivals. These festivals have a significant impact on local communities and are multifaceted as they do not just provide economic impact to host communities, but also positive or potentially negative social and environmental impacts. In recent years, a more sustainable approach integrating economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts has been suggested when analyzing short term event such as festivals. It is important …

Contributors
Scott, Karla, Chhabra, Deepak, Timothy, Dallen, et al.
Created Date
2015

Denver, Colorado is experiencing an unprecedented growth spurt, particularly in the downtown neighborhoods. As such, the city has proposed a multitude of urban revitalization projects in its urban core. This pattern of revitalization has unintended consequences including changes in residents’ meanings assigned to their neighborhoods and subsequently changes in residents’ attachment to those neighborhoods. Given this, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to use a symbolic interactionist perspective to uncover resident meanings of their neighborhoods and discover how redevelopment efforts are affecting those assigned meanings. Participants, recruited through the snowball sampling method in the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea neighborhoods in …

Contributors
Humberger, Olivia, Budruk, Megha, Knopf, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2018