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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


In my thesis, I characterize multi-nuclear manganese cofactors in modified reaction centers from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. I characterized interactions between a variety of secondary electron donors and modified reaction centers. In Chapter 1, I provide the research aims, background, and a summary of the chapters in my thesis. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, I present my work with artificial four-helix bundles as secondary electron donors to modified bacterial reaction centers. In Chapter 2, I characterize the binding and energetics of the P1 Mn-protein, as a secondary electron donor to modified reaction centers. In Chapter 3, I present the …

Contributors
Espiritu, Eduardo, Allen, James P, Jones, Anne K, et al.
Created Date
2019

Over the last century, X-ray crystallography has been established as the most successful technique for unravelling the structure-function relationship in molecules. For integral membrane proteins, growing well-ordered large crystals is a challenge and hence, there is room for improving current methods of macromolecular crystallography and for exploring complimentary techniques. Since protein function is deeply associated with its structural dynamics, static position of atoms in a macromolecule are insufficient to unlock the mechanism. The availability of X-ray free electron lasers presents an opportunity to study micron-sized crystals that could be triggered (using light, small molecules or physical conditions) to capture macromolecules …

Contributors
Roy Chowdhury, Shatabdi, Fromme, Petra, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2018

Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging method that allows for structural discovery to be performed on biomacromolecules during their dynamic trajectory through a reaction pathway after activation. This is performed by triggering a reaction on an ensemble of molecules in nano- or microcrystals and then using femtosecond X-ray laser pulses produced by an X-ray free electron laser to collect near-instantaneous data on the crystal. A full data set can be collected by merging a sufficient number of these patterns together and multiple data sets can be collected at different points along the reaction pathway by manipulating the delay time …

Contributors
Coe, Jesse, Fromme, Petra, Sayres, Scott, et al.
Created Date
2018

Biomolecules can easily recognize its corresponding partner and get bound to it, resulting in controlling various processes (immune system, inter or intracellular signaling) in biology and physiology. Bonding between two partners can be a result of electrostatic, hydrophobic interactions or shape complementarity. It is of great importance to study these kinds of biomolecular interactions to have a detailed knowledge of above mentioned physiological processes. These studies can also open avenues for other aspects of science such as drug development. Discussed in the first part of Chapter 1 are the biotin-streptavidin biomolecular interaction studies by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface …

Contributors
Biswas, Sudipta, Lindsay, Stuart, Zhang, Peiming, et al.
Created Date
2016

One of the greatest problems facing society today is the development of a sustainable, carbon neutral energy source to curb the reliance on fossil fuel combustion as the primary source of energy. To overcome this challenge, research efforts have turned to biology for inspiration, as nature is adept at inter-converting low molecular weight precursors into complex molecules. A number of inorganic catalysts have been reported that mimic the active sites of energy-relevant enzymes such as hydrogenases and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. However, these inorganic models fail to achieve the high activity of the enzymes, which function in aqueous systems, as they …

Contributors
Sommer, Dayn Joseph, Ghirlanda, Giovanna, Redding, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2016

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the universal chemical energy currency in most living cells, used to power many cellular reactions and generated by an enzyme supercomplex known as the ATP synthase, consisting of a hydrophilic F1 subcomplex and a membrane-bound FO subcomplex. Driven by the electrochemical gradient generated by the respiratory or photosynthetic electron transport chain, the rotation of the FO domain drives movements of the central stalk in response to conformational changes in the F1 domain, in which the physical energy is converted into chemical energy through the condensation of ADP and Pi to ATP. The exact mechanism how ATP …

Contributors
Yang, Jay-How, Fromme, Petra, Redding, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2015

The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 associates noncovalently with the surface subunit (gp120) and together they play essential roles in viral mucosal transmission and infection of target cells. The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683) of gp41 is highly conserved and contains epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies. The transmembrane (TM) domain (residues 684-705) of gp41 not only anchors the envelope glycoprotein complex in the viral membrane but also dynamically affects the interactions of the MPR with the membrane. While high-resolution X-ray structures of some segments of the MPR were solved in the past, they represent the …

Contributors
Gong, Zhen, Fromme, Petra, Mor, Tsafrir, et al.
Created Date
2014

The AAA+ ATPase Rubisco activase (Rca) regulates the activity of Rubisco, the photosynthetic enzyme responsible for catalyzing biological carbon fixation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Rca self-association controls Rubisco reactivation activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we are using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to better characterize the thermodynamics of the assembly process of cotton Rca. We present FCS data for Rca in the presence of Mg*ATPgS and Mg*ADP and for the D173N Walker B motif mutant in the presence of Mg*ATP. Our data are consistent with promotion and stabilization of hexamers by Mg*ATPgS and Mg*ATP, whereas Mg*ADP facilitates …

Contributors
Kuriata, Agnieszka Magdalena, Wachter, Rebekka, Redding, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2014

A vast amount of energy emanates from the sun, and at the distance of Earth, approximately 172,500 TW reaches the atmosphere. Of that, 80,600 TW reaches the surface with 15,600 TW falling on land. Photosynthesis converts 156 TW in the form of biomass, which represents all food/fuel for the biosphere with about 20 TW of the total product used by humans. Additionally, our society uses approximately 20 more TW of energy from ancient photosynthetic products i.e. fossil fuels. In order to mitigate climate problems, the carbon dioxide must be removed from the human energy usage by replacement or recycling as …

Contributors
Vaughn, Michael David, Moore, Thomas, Fromme, Petra, et al.
Created Date
2014

Cyanovirin-N (CVN) is a cyanobacterial lectin with potent anti-HIV activity, mediated by binding to the N-linked oligosaccharide moiety of the envelope protein gp120. CVN offers a scaffold to develop multivalent carbohydrate-binding proteins with tunable specificities and affinities. I present here biophysical calculations completed on a monomeric-stabilized mutant of cyanovirin-N, P51G-m4-CVN, in which domain A binding activity is abolished by four mutations; with comparisons made to CVN<super>mutDB</super>, in which domain B binding activity is abolished. Using Monte Carlo calculations and docking simulations, mutations in CVN<super>mutDB</super> were considered singularly, and the mutations E41A/G and T57A were found to impact the affinity towards …

Contributors
Woodrum, Brian William, Ghirlanda, Giovanna, Redding, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2014