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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Automated driving systems are in an intensive research and development stage, and the companies developing these systems are targeting to deploy them on public roads in a very near future. Guaranteeing safe operation of these systems is crucial as they are planned to carry passengers and share the road with other vehicles and pedestrians. Yet, there is no agreed-upon approach on how and in what detail those systems should be tested. Different organizations have different testing approaches, and one common approach is to combine simulation-based testing with real-world driving. One of the expectations from fully-automated vehicles is never to cause …

Contributors
Tuncali, Cumhur Erkan, Fainekos, Georgios, Ben Amor, Heni, et al.
Created Date
2019

Designers employ a variety of modeling theories and methodologies to create functional models of discrete network systems. These dynamical models are evaluated using verification and validation techniques throughout incremental design stages. Models created for these systems should directly represent their growing complexity with respect to composition and heterogeneity. Similar to software engineering practices, incremental model design is required for complex system design. As a result, models at early increments are significantly simpler relative to real systems. While experimenting (verification or validation) on models at early increments are computationally less demanding, the results of these experiments are less trustworthy and less …

Contributors
Gholami, Soroosh, Sarjoughian, Hessam S, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are being used in many safety-critical applications. Due to the important role in virtually every aspect of human life, it is crucial to make sure that a CPS works properly before its deployment. However, formal verification of CPS is a computationally hard problem. Therefore, lightweight verification methods such as testing and monitoring of the CPS are considered in the industry. The formal representation of the CPS requirements is a challenging task. In addition, checking the system outputs with respect to requirements is a computationally complex problem. In this dissertation, these problems for the verification of CPS are …

Contributors
Dokhanchi, Adel, Fainekos, Georgios, Lee, Yann-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2017

User satisfaction is pivotal to the success of mobile applications. At the same time, it is imperative to maximize the energy efficiency of the mobile device to ensure optimal usage of the limited energy source available to mobile devices while maintaining the necessary levels of user satisfaction. However, this is complicated due to user interactions, numerous shared resources, and network conditions that produce substantial uncertainty to the mobile device's performance and power characteristics. In this dissertation, a new approach is presented to characterize and control mobile devices that accurately models these uncertainties. The proposed modeling framework is a completely data-driven …

Contributors
Gaudette, Benjamin David, Vrudhula, Sarma, Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2017

Testing and Verification of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) is a challenging problem. The challenge arises as a result of the complex interactions between the components of these systems: the digital control, and the physical environment. Furthermore, the software complexity that governs the high-level control logic in these systems is increasing day by day. As a result, in recent years, both the academic community and the industry have been heavily invested in developing tools and methodologies for the development of safety-critical systems. One scalable approach in testing and verification of these systems is through guided system simulation using stochastic optimization techniques. The …

Contributors
Hoxha, Bardh, Fainekos, Georgios, Sarjoughian, Hessam, et al.
Created Date
2017

Several physical systems exist in the real world that involve continuous as well as discrete changes. These range from natural dynamic systems like the system of a bouncing ball to robotic dynamic systems such as planning the motion of a robot across obstacles. The key aspects of effectively describing such dynamic systems is to be able to plan and verify the evolution of the continuous components of the system while simultaneously maintaining critical constraints. Developing a framework that can effectively represent and find solutions to such physical systems prove to be highly advantageous. Both hybrid automata and action languages are …

Contributors
Loney, Nikhil, Lee, Joohyung, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2017

To ensure system integrity, robots need to proactively avoid any unwanted physical perturbation that may cause damage to the underlying hardware. In this thesis work, we investigate a machine learning approach that allows robots to anticipate impending physical perturbations from perceptual cues. In contrast to other approaches that require knowledge about sources of perturbation to be encoded before deployment, our method is based on experiential learning. Robots learn to associate visual cues with subsequent physical perturbations and contacts. In turn, these extracted visual cues are then used to predict potential future perturbations acting on the robot. To this end, we …

Contributors
Sur, Indranil, Amor, Heni B, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2017

For autonomous vehicles, intelligent autonomous intersection management will be required for safe and efficient operation. In order to achieve safe operation despite uncertainties in vehicle trajectory, intersection management techniques must consider a safety buffer around the vehicles. For truly safe operation, an extra buffer space should be added to account for the network and computational delay caused by communication with the Intersection Manager (IM). However, modeling the worst-case computation and network delay as additional buffer around the vehicle degrades the throughput of the intersection. To avoid this problem, AIM, a popular state-of-the-art IM, adopts a query-based approach in which the …

Contributors
Andert, Edward, Shrivastava, Aviral, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cyber-physical systems and hard real-time systems have strict timing constraints that specify deadlines until which tasks must finish their execution. Missing a deadline can cause unexpected outcome or endanger human lives in safety-critical applications, such as automotive or aeronautical systems. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to obtain and optimize a safe upper bound of each task’s execution time or the worst-case execution time (WCET), to guarantee the absence of any missed deadline. Unfortunately, conventional microarchitectural components, such as caches and branch predictors, are only optimized for average-case performance and often make WCET analysis complicated and pessimistic. Caches especially have …

Contributors
Kim, Yooseong, Shrivastava, Aviral, Broman, David, et al.
Created Date
2017

Multi-sensor fusion is a fundamental problem in Robot Perception. For a robot to operate in a real world environment, multiple sensors are often needed. Thus, fusing data from various sensors accurately is vital for robot perception. In the first part of this thesis, the problem of fusing information from a LIDAR, a color camera and a thermal camera to build RGB-Depth-Thermal (RGBDT) maps is investigated. An algorithm that solves a non-linear optimization problem to compute the relative pose between the cameras and the LIDAR is presented. The relative pose estimate is then used to find the color and thermal texture …

Contributors
Krishnan, Aravindhan K., Saripalli, Srikanth, Klesh, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2016