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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2019


This dissertation aims at developing novel materials and processing routes using alkali activated aluminosilicate binders for porous (lightweight) geopolymer matrices and 3D-printing concrete applications. The major research objectives are executed in different stages. Stage 1 includes developing synthesis routes, microstructural characterization, and performance characterization of a family of economical, multifunctional porous ceramics developed through geopolymerization of an abundant volcanic tuff (aluminosilicate mineral) as the primary source material. Metakaolin, silica fume, alumina powder, and pure silicon powder are also used as additional ingredients when necessary and activated by potassium-based alkaline agents. In Stage 2, a processing route was developed to synthesize …

Contributors
ALGHAMDI, HUSSAM SUHAIL, Neithalath, Narayanan, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2019

An orthotropic elasto-plastic damage material model (OEPDMM) suitable for impact simulations has been developed through a joint research project funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Development of the model includes derivation of the theoretical details, implementation of the theory into LS-DYNA®, a commercially available nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, as material model MAT 213, and verification and validation of the model. The material model is comprised of three major components: deformation, damage, and failure. The deformation sub-model is used to capture both linear and nonlinear deformations through a classical plasticity …

Contributors
Khaled, Bilal Marwan, Rajan, Subramaniam D, Mobasher, Barzin, et al.
Created Date
2019

A comprehensive study was performed on non-proprietary ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) material and several design methods were suggested based on numerous experimental results. Several sets of compression tests, direct tensile tests, and flexural tests were performed on UHPC to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical behavior of the fiber reinforced material. In addition to compressive tests, flexural tests, based on ASTM C1609 and EN 14651, were performed. The effect of the strain rate on the UHPC material was also investigated through the high-speed tensile tests at different strain rates. Alongside the usual measurement tools such as …

Contributors
Kianmofrad, Farrokh, Mobasher, Barzin, Rajan, Subramaniam Dharma, et al.
Created Date
2018

With the growth of global population, the demand for sustainable infrastructure is significantly increasing. Substructures with appropriate materials are required to be built in or above soil that can support the massive volume of construction demand. However, increased structural requirements often require ground improvement to increase the soil capacity. Moreover, certain soils are prone to liquefaction during an earthquake, which results in significant structural damage and loss of lives. While various soil treatment methods have been developed in the past to improve the soil’s load carrying ability, most of these traditional treatment methods have been found either hazardous and may …

Contributors
Yang, Pu, Neithalath, Narayanan, Kavazanjian, Edward, et al.
Created Date
2018

Being a remarkably versatile and inexpensive building material, concrete has found tremendous use in development of modern infrastructure and is the most widely used material in the world. Extensive research in the field of concrete has led to the development of a wide array of concretes with applications ranging from building of skyscrapers to paving of highways. These varied applications require special cementitious composites which can satisfy the demand for enhanced functionalities such as high strength, high durability and improved thermal characteristics among others. The current study focuses on the fundamental understanding of such functional composites, from their microstructural design …

Contributors
Arora, Aashay, Neithalath, Narayanan, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2018

Phase change materials (PCMs) are combined sensible-and-latent thermal energy storage materials that can be used to store and dissipate energy in the form of heat. PCMs incorporated into wall-element systems have been well-studied with respect to energy efficiency of building envelopes. New applications of PCMs in infrastructural concrete, e.g., for mitigating early-age cracking and freeze-and-thaw induced damage, have also been proposed. Hence, the focus of this dissertation is to develop a detailed understanding of the physic-chemical and thermo-mechanical characteristics of cementitious systems and novel coating systems for wall-elements containing PCM. The initial phase of this work assesses the influence of …

Contributors
Aguayo, Matthew Joseph, Neithalath, Narayanan, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2018

This research summarizes the validation testing completed for the material model MAT213, currently implemented in the LS-DYNA finite element program. Testing was carried out using a carbon fiber composite material, T800-F3900. Stacked-ply tension and compression tests were performed for open-hole and full coupons. Comparisons of experimental and simulation results showed a good agreement between the two for metrics including, stress-strain response and displacements. Strains and displacements in the direction of loading were better predicted by the simulations than for that of the transverse direction. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed experimentally and through simulations to determine …

Contributors
Holt, Nathan T, Rajan, Subramaniam, Mobasher, Barzin, et al.
Created Date
2018

Concrete is relatively brittle, and its tensile strength is typically only about one-tenth of its compressive strength. Regular concrete is therefore normally uses reinforcement steel bars to increase the tensile strength. It is becoming increasingly popular to use random distributed fibers as reinforcement and polymeric fibers is once such kind. In the case of polymeric fibers, due to hydrophobicity and lack of any chemical bond between the fiber and matrix, the weak interface zone limits the ability of the fibers to effectively carry the load that is on the matrix phase. Depending on the fiber’s surface asperity, shape, chemical nature, …

Contributors
Tiwari, Sanchay Sushil, Mobasher, Barzin, Neithalath, Narayanan, et al.
Created Date
2018

The concept of Creep is a term used to define the tendency of stressed materials to develop an increasing strain through time under a sustained load, thus having an increase in deflection or having an elongation with time in relation to the short term strain. While the subject of compression creep of concrete is well developed, use of concrete under tension loads has been limited at best due to brittleness of concrete. However with the advent of using fiber reinforced concrete, more and more applications where concrete is expected to carry tensile loads due to incorporation of fibers is gaining …

Contributors
Gohel, Megha Rajendrakumar, Mobasher, Barzin, Dharmarajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2017

Pultrusion manufacturing technique stands at the forefront for efficient production of continuous, uniform concrete composites for use in large scale structural applications. High volume and low labor, among other benefits such as improved impregnation and better sample consistency, stand as some of the crucial advances found in automated pultrusion. These advantages introduce textile reinforced concrete (TRC) composites as a potential surrogate for wood, light gauge steel, and other common structural materials into an ever changing and broadening market of industrial grade structural sections. With the potential modifications of textile geometry, textile type, section geometry, and connection type, the options presented …

Contributors
Bauchmoyer, Jacob MacGregor, Mobasher, Barzin, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2017