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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2018


Most drugs work by binding to receptors on the cell surface. These receptors can then carry the message into the cell and have a wide array of results. However, studying how fast the binding is can be difficult. Current methods involve extracting the receptor and labeling them, but both these steps have issues. Previous works found that binding on the cell surface is accompanied with a small change in cell size, generally an increase. They have also developed an algorithm that can track these small changes without a label using a simple bright field microscope. Here, this relationship is further …

Contributors
Hunt, Ashley, Tao, Nongjian, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2018

Proteins play a central role to human body and biological activities. As powerful tools for protein detections, many surface plasmon resonance based techniques have been developed to enhance the sensitivity. However, sensitivity is not the only final goal. As a biosensor, four things really matter: sensitivity, specificity, resolution (temporal/spatial) and throughput. This dissertation presents several works on developing novel plasmonic based techniques for protein detections on the last two aspects to extend the application field. A fast electrochemically controlled plasmonic detection technique is first developed with the capability of monitoring electrochemical signal with nanosecond response time. The study reveals that …

Contributors
Wang, Yan, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018

Measuring molecular interaction with membrane proteins is critical for understanding cellular functions, validating biomarkers and screening drugs. Despite the importance, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge, especially for small molecules binding to membrane proteins in their native cellular environment. The current mainstream practice is to isolate membrane proteins from the cell membranes, which is difficult and often lead to the loss of their native structures and functions. In this thesis, novel detection methods for in situ quantification of molecular interactions with membrane proteins are described. First, a label-free surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) platform is developed for …

Contributors
Zhang, Fenni, Tao, Nongjian, Chae, Junseok, et al.
Created Date
2018

Antibiotic resistant bacteria are a worldwide epidemic threatening human survival. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests (ASTs) are important for confirming susceptibility to empirical antibiotics and detecting resistance in bacterial isolates. Current ASTs are based on bacterial culturing, which take 2-14 days to complete depending on the microbial growth rate. Considering the high mortality and morbidity rates for most acute infections, such long time frames are clinically impractical and pose a huge risk to a patient's life. A faster AST will reduce morbidity and mortality rates, as well as help healthcare providers, administer narrow spectrum antibiotics at the earliest possible treatment stage. In …

Contributors
Syal, Karan, Tao, Nongjian, Haydel, Shelley, et al.
Created Date
2017

Studying charge transport through single molecules is of great importance for unravelling charge transport mechanisms, investigating fundamentals of chemistry, and developing functional building blocks in molecular electronics. First, a study of the thermoelectric effect in single DNA molecules is reported. By varying the molecular length and sequence, the charge transport in DNA was tuned to either a hopping- or tunneling-dominated regimes. In the hopping regime, the thermoelectric effect is small and insensitive to the molecular length. Meanwhile, in the tunneling regime, the thermoelectric effect is large and sensitive to the length. These findings indicate that by varying its sequence and …

Contributors
Li, Yueqi, Tao, Nongjian, Buttry, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2017

In this thesis, a breadboard Integrated Microarray Printing and Detection System (IMPDS) was proposed to address key limitations of traditional microarrays. IMPDS integrated two core components of a high-resolution surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system and a piezoelectric dispensing system that can print ultra-low volume droplets. To avoid evaporation of droplets in the microarray, a 100 μm thick oil layer (dodecane) was used to cover the chip surface. The interaction between BSA (Bovine serum albumin) and Anti-BSA was used to evaluate the capability of IMPDS. The alignment variability of printing, stability of droplets array and quantification of protein-protein interactions based …

Contributors
Xiao, Feng, Tao, Nongjian, Borges, Chad, et al.
Created Date
2017

Monitoring vital physiological signals, such as heart rate, blood pressure and breathing pattern, are basic requirements in the diagnosis and management of various diseases. Traditionally, these signals are measured only in hospital and clinical settings. An important recent trend is the development of portable devices for tracking these physiological signals non-invasively by using optical methods. These portable devices, when combined with cell phones, tablets or other mobile devices, provide a new opportunity for everyone to monitor one’s vital signs out of clinic. This thesis work develops camera-based systems and algorithms to monitor several physiological waveforms and parameters, without having to …

Contributors
Shao, Dangdang, Tao, Nongjian, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2016

Mechanical properties of cells are important in maintaining physiological functions of biological systems. Quantitative measurement and analysis of mechanical properties can help understand cellular mechanics and its functional relevance and discover physical biomarkers for diseases monitoring and therapeutics. This dissertation presents a work to develop optical methods for studying cell mechanics which encompasses four applications. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy based optical method has been applied to image intracellular motions and cell mechanical motion. This label-free technique enables ultrafast imaging with extremely high sensitivity in detecting cell deformation. The technique was first applied to study intracellular transportation. Organelle transportation process and …

Contributors
Yang, Yunze, Tao, Nongjian, Wang, Shaopeng, et al.
Created Date
2016

Charge transport in molecular systems, including DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid), is involved in many basic chemical and biological processes. Studying their charge transport properties can help developing DNA based electronic devices with many tunable functionalities. This thesis investigates the electric properties of double-stranded DNA, DNA G-quadruplex and dsDNA with modified base. First, double-stranded DNA with alternating GC sequence and stacked GC sequence were measured with respect to length. The resistance of DNA sequences increases linearly with length, indicating a hopping transport mechanism. However, for DNA sequences with stacked GC, a periodic oscillation is superimposed on the linear length dependence, indicating a …

Contributors
Xiang, Limin, Tao, Nongjian, Lindsay, Stuart, et al.
Created Date
2016

Detection of molecular interactions is critical for understanding many biological processes, for detecting disease biomarkers, and for screening drug candidates. Fluorescence-based approach can be problematic, especially when applied to the detection of small molecules. Various label-free techniques, such as surface plasmon resonance technique are sensitive to mass, making it extremely challenging to detect small molecules. In this thesis, novel detection methods for molecular interactions are described. First, a simple detection paradigm based on reflectance interferometry is developed. This method is simple, low cost and can be easily applied for protein array detection. Second, a label-free charge sensitive optical detection (CSOD) …

Contributors
Guan, Yan, Tao, Nongjian, LaBaer, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2015