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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Phenotypic and molecular profiling demonstrates a high degree of heterogeneity in the breast tumors. TP53 tumor suppressor is mutated in 30% of all breast tumors and the mutation frequency in basal-like subtype is as high as 80% and co-exists with several other somatic mutations in different genes. It was hypothesized that tumor heterogeneity is a result of a combination of neo-morphic functions of specific TP53 driver mutations and distinct co-mutations or the co-drivers for each type of TP53 mutation. The 10 most common p53 missense mutant proteins found in breast cancer patients were ectopically expressed in normal-like mammary epithelial cells …

Contributors
Pal, Anasuya, LaBaer, Joshua, Roberson, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

Continuing and increasing reliance on fossil fuels to satisfy our population’s energy demands has encouraged the search for renewable carbon-free and carbon-neutral sources, such as hydrogen gas or CO2 reduction products. Inspired by nature, one of the objectives of this dissertation was to develop protein-based strategies that can be applied in the production of green fuels. The first project of this dissertation aimed at developing a controllable strategy to incorporate domains with different functions (e. g. catalytic sites, electron transfer modules, light absorbing subunits) into a single multicomponent system. This was accomplished through the rational design of 2,2’-bipyridine modified dimeric …

Contributors
Alcala-Torano, Rafael de Jesus, Ghirlanda, Giovanna, Moore, Ana L, et al.
Created Date
2019

Redox enzymes represent a big group of proteins and they serve as catalysts for biological processes that involve electron transfer. These proteins contain a redox center that determines their functional properties, and hence, altering this center or incorporating non-biological redox cofactor to proteins has been used as a means to generate redox proteins with desirable activities for biological and chemical applications. Porphyrins and Fe-S clusters are among the most common cofactors that biology employs for electron transfer processes and there have been many studies on potential activities that they offer in redox reactions. In this dissertation, redox activity of Fe-S …

Contributors
Bahrami Dizicheh, Zahra, Ghirlanda, Giovanna, Allen, James P, et al.
Created Date
2019

The fundamental building blocks for constructing complex synthetic gene networks are effective biological parts with wide dynamic range, low crosstalk, and modularity. RNA-based components are promising sources of such parts since they can provide regulation at the level of transcription and translation and their predictable base pairing properties enable large libraries to be generated through in silico design. This dissertation studies two different approaches for initiating interactions between RNA molecules to implement RNA-based components that achieve translational regulation. First, single-stranded domains known as toeholds were employed for detection of the highly prevalent foodborne pathogen norovirus. Toehold switch riboregulators activated by …

Contributors
MA, DUO, Green, Alexander, Mangone, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2019

This study aims to address the deficiencies of the Marcus model of electron transfer (ET) and then provide modifications to the model. A confirmation of the inverted energy gap law, which is the cleanest verification so far, is presented for donor-acceptor complexes. In addition to the macroscopic properties of the solvent, the physical properties of the solvent are incorporated in the model via the microscopic solvation model. For the molecules studied in this dissertation, the rate constant first increases with cooling, in contrast to the prediction of the Arrhenius law, and then decreases at lower temperatures. Additionally, the polarizability of …

Contributors
Waskasi, Morteza, Matyushov, Dmitry, Richert, Ranko, et al.
Created Date
2019

Generating amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) containing active pharmaceutical ingredients has become a favorable technique of emerging prominence to improve drug solubility and overall bioavailability. Cannabidiol (CBD) has now become a major focus in cannabinoid research due to its ability to serve as an anti-inflammatory agent, showing promising results in treating a wide array of debilitating diseases and pathologies. The following work provides evidence for generating homogenous glass phase amorphous solid dispersions containing 50% (w/w) up to 75% (w/w) CBD concentrations in the domain size of 2 – 5 nm. Concentrations up to 85% (w/w) CBD were concluded homogenous in the …

Contributors
Blass, Brandon Lewis, Yarger, Jeff L, Holland, Greg, et al.
Created Date
2019

Microscopic algae have been investigated extensively by researchers for decades for their ability to bioremediate wastewater and flue gas while producing valuable biomass for use as feed, fuel, fertilizer, nutraceutical, and other specialty products. Reports of the exciting commercial potential of this diverse group of organisms started appearing in the literature as early as the 1940’s. However, nearly 80 years later, relatively few successful commercial microalgae installations exist and algae have not yet reached agricultural commodity status. This dissertation examines three major bottlenecks to commercial microalgae production including lack of an efficient and economical cultivation strategy, poor management of volatile …

Contributors
Wray, Joshua, Dempster, Thomas, Roberson, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

In my thesis, I characterize multi-nuclear manganese cofactors in modified reaction centers from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. I characterized interactions between a variety of secondary electron donors and modified reaction centers. In Chapter 1, I provide the research aims, background, and a summary of the chapters in my thesis. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, I present my work with artificial four-helix bundles as secondary electron donors to modified bacterial reaction centers. In Chapter 2, I characterize the binding and energetics of the P1 Mn-protein, as a secondary electron donor to modified reaction centers. In Chapter 3, I present the …

Contributors
Espiritu, Eduardo, Allen, James P, Jones, Anne K, et al.
Created Date
2019

Cancer is a major public health challenge and the second leading cause of death in the United States. Large amount of effort has been made to achieve sensitive and specific detection of cancer, and to predict the course of cancer. Glycans are promising avenues toward the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, because aberrant glycosylation is a prevalent hallmark of diverse types of cancer. A bottom-up “glycan node analysis” approach was employed as a useful tool, which captures most essential glycan features from blood plasma or serum (P/S) specimens and quantifies them as single analytical signals, to a lung cancer set …

Contributors
Hu, Yueming, Borges, Chad R, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2019

Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1) is an enzyme that catalyzes disulfide bond formation by oxidizing two free sulfhydryl groups. QSOX1 consists of a thioredoxin (Trx) and an ERV (essential for respiration and viability)/ALR (augmenter of liver regeneration) domain which each contain CxxC motifs that work to bind to substrates and shuttle electrons to a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor that accepts the electrons and reduces molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Investigation of the role of QSOX1 in cancer progression started when it was found at higher abundance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patient plasma compared to healthy normal donor plasma. …

Contributors
Koelbel, Calvin, Lake, Douglas, Chen, Qiang "Shawn", et al.
Created Date
2019