Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Masters Thesis
Date Range
2011 2019


Generating amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) containing active pharmaceutical ingredients has become a favorable technique of emerging prominence to improve drug solubility and overall bioavailability. Cannabidiol (CBD) has now become a major focus in cannabinoid research due to its ability to serve as an anti-inflammatory agent, showing promising results in treating a wide array of debilitating diseases and pathologies. The following work provides evidence for generating homogenous glass phase amorphous solid dispersions containing 50% (w/w) up to 75% (w/w) CBD concentrations in the domain size of 2 – 5 nm. Concentrations up to 85% (w/w) CBD were concluded homogenous in the …

Contributors
Blass, Brandon Lewis, Yarger, Jeff L, Holland, Greg, et al.
Created Date
2019

Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1) is an enzyme that catalyzes disulfide bond formation by oxidizing two free sulfhydryl groups. QSOX1 consists of a thioredoxin (Trx) and an ERV (essential for respiration and viability)/ALR (augmenter of liver regeneration) domain which each contain CxxC motifs that work to bind to substrates and shuttle electrons to a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor that accepts the electrons and reduces molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Investigation of the role of QSOX1 in cancer progression started when it was found at higher abundance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patient plasma compared to healthy normal donor plasma. …

Contributors
Koelbel, Calvin, Lake, Douglas, Chen, Qiang "Shawn", et al.
Created Date
2019

Most drugs work by binding to receptors on the cell surface. These receptors can then carry the message into the cell and have a wide array of results. However, studying how fast the binding is can be difficult. Current methods involve extracting the receptor and labeling them, but both these steps have issues. Previous works found that binding on the cell surface is accompanied with a small change in cell size, generally an increase. They have also developed an algorithm that can track these small changes without a label using a simple bright field microscope. Here, this relationship is further …

Contributors
Hunt, Ashley, Tao, Nongjian, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2018

To mimic the membrane environment for the photosynthetic reaction center of the photoheterotrophic Heliobacterium modesticaldum, a proteoliposome system was developed using the lipids found in native membranes, as well as a lipid possessing a Ni(II)-NTA head group. The liposomes were also saturated with menaquinone-9 to provide further native conditions, given that menaquinone is active within the heliobacterial reaction center in some way. Purified heliobacterial reaction center was reconstituted into the liposomes and a recombinant cytochrome c553 was decorated onto the liposome surface. The native lipid-attachment sequence of cytochrome c553 was truncated and replaced with a hexahistidine tag. Thus, the membrane-anchoring …

Contributors
Johnson, William Alexander, Redding, Kevin E, Van Horn, Wade D, et al.
Created Date
2018

Alzheimer’s disease is a major problem affecting over 5.7 million Americans. Although much is known about the effects of this neurogenerative disease, the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. One very important characteristic of Alzheimer’s is the accumulation of beta amyloid protein which often results in plaques. To understand these beta amyloid proteins better, antibody fragments may be used to bind to these oligomers and potentially reduce the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. This thesis focused on the expression and crystallization the fragment antigen binding antibody fragment A4. A fragment antigen binding fragment was chosen to be worked with as it is …

Contributors
Colasurd, Paige, Nannenga, Brent, Mills, Jeremy, et al.
Created Date
2018

Measles is a contagious, vaccine-preventable disease that continues to be the leading cause of death in children younger than the age of 5 years. While the introduction of the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella vaccine (MMR) has significantly decreased morbidity and mortality rates worldwide, vaccine coverage is highly variable across global regions. Current diagnostic methods rely on enzyme immunoassays (EIA) to detect IgM or IgG Abs in serum. Commercially available Diamedix Immunosimplicity® Measles IgG test kit has been shown to have 91.1% sensitivity and 93.8% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 88.7% and a negative predictive value of 90.9% on …

Contributors
Mushtaq, Zuena, Anderson, Karen, Blattman, Joseph, et al.
Created Date
2016

Biomass synthesis is a competing factor in biological systems geared towards generation of commodity and specialty chemicals, ultimately limiting maximum titer and yield; in this thesis, a widely generalizable, modular approach focused on decoupling biomass synthesis from the production of the phenylalanine in a genetically modified strain of E. coli BW25113 was explored with the use of synthetic trans-encoded small RNA (sRNA) to achieve greater efficiency. The naturally occurring sRNA MicC was used as a scaffold, and combined on a plasmid with a promoter for anhydrous tetracycline (aTc) and a T1/TE terminator. The coding sequence corresponding to the target binding …

Contributors
Herschel, Daniel Jordan, Nielsen, David R, Torres, Cesar I, et al.
Created Date
2016

Protein affinity reagents have aptly gained profound importance as capture reagents and drugs in basic research, biotechnology, diagnostics and therapeutics. However, due to the cost, labor and time associated with production of antibodies focus has recently changed towards potential of peptides to act as protein affinity reagents. Affinity peptides are easy to work with, non-immunogenic, cost effective and amenable to scale up. Even though researchers have developed several affinity peptides, we are far from compiling library of peptides that encompasses entire human proteome. My thesis describes high throughput pipeline that can be used to develop and characterize affinity peptides that …

Contributors
Shah, Pankti, Chaput, John, Hecht, Sidney, et al.
Created Date
2014

Specificity and affinity towards a given ligand/epitope limit target-specific delivery. Companies can spend between $500 million to $2 billion attempting to discover a new drug or therapy; a significant portion of this expense funds high-throughput screening to find the most successful target-specific compound available. A more recent addition to discovering highly specific targets is the application of phage display utilizing single chain variable fragment antibodies (scFv). The aim of this research was to employ phage display to identify pathologies related to traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly astrogliosis. A unique biopanning method against viable astrocyte cultures activated with TGF-β achieved this …

Contributors
Marsh, William, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, Caplan, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2013

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the most common form of dementia. Its cause remains unknown, but it is known to involve two hallmark pathologies: Amyloid Beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Several proteins have been implicated in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, including Tau and S100B. S100B is a dimeric protein that is typically found bound to Ca(II) or Zn(II). These experiments relate to the involvement of S100B in Alzheimer's Disease-related processes and the results suggest that future research of S100B is warranted. Zn(II)-S100B was found to increase the rate …

Contributors
Naegele, Hayley Golek, Mcgregor, Wade C, Baluch, Debra, et al.
Created Date
2013