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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Language
  • English
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Background: Exercise is Medicine (EIM) is a health promotion strategy for addressing physical inactivity in healthcare. However, it is unknown how to successfully implement the processes. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand how implementing EIM influenced provider behaviors in a university-based healthcare system, using a process evaluation. Methods: A multiple baseline, time series design was used. Providers were allocated to three groups. Group 1 (n=11) was exposed to an electronic medical record (EMR) systems change, EIM-related resources, and EIM training session. Group 2 (n=5) received the EMR change and resources but no training. Group 3 (n=6) was …

Contributors
Birchfield, Natasha R, Der Ananian, Cheryl, Krasnow, Aaron, et al.
Created Date
2019

More underrepresented minority (URM) healthcare professionals are needed to improve health equity. Although holistic review in admissions has the potential to increase URM participation in health professions, recent data suggest that its impact varies substantially. The purpose of the dissertation research described here was to identify interventions to increase diversity among healthcare professionals and explore holistic review use in physician assistant (PA) program admissions to advance understanding of effective practices. PA programs were selected as an important prototype for exploratory studies since the extent of holistic review use in PA programs was unknown; at the same time, URM representation among …

Contributors
Coplan, Bettie, Lamb, Gerri, Evans, Bronwynne, et al.
Created Date
2019

Most studies that explored the health benefits of interrupting sitting time focused on using different modalities (i.e., comparing walking vs standing breaks)33,36,59. However, experimental studies that directly compare patterns of interrupting sitting time through standing only are needed to advance the field. This study aimed to (i) determine if there is a difference in glucose response between continuous sitting (CS) and two intermittent standing regimes (high frequency, low duration breaks (HFLD) and low frequency, high duration breaks (LFHD)) and (ii) to determine if there is a difference in glucose response between the two strategies (HFLD vs. LFHD). Ten sedentary employees …

Contributors
Toledo, Meynard John Lapore, Buman, Matthew P, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2019

Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine how vocabulary size and inhibitory control affect word learning in bilingual (English-Spanish) children with hearing loss. Experiment 1 examined whether children with larger vocabularies learn and retain more words than children with smaller vocabularies. Experiment 2 examined whether children with better inhibitory control learn and remember more words than children with poorer inhibitory control. In addition, monolingual and bilingual children with and without hearing loss were compared on word learning and inhibitory control tasks. Method: Seventy-three children between 8 and 12 years of age participated in the study. Forty children had …

Contributors
de Diego Lazaro, Beatriz, Pittman, Andrea L, Restrepo, María A, et al.
Created Date
2019

Obesity and arthritis are risk factors for falls. Little is known about the effects of weight loss on balance in people with arthritis. The Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB) ProgramTM is an evidence-based, lifestyle change program for weight loss in individuals with prediabetes but it hasn’t been evaluated in people with arthritis. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an adapted version of the GLB on balance outcomes among overweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) >27) individuals with arthritis. A single-group, quasi- experimental design was used to examine the effects of the adapted GLB program on measures …

Contributors
Merkel, Aubry, DerAnanian, Cheryl, Swan, Pamela, et al.
Created Date
2019

Objective: Parents play a critical role in their child's diets, yet there is lack of research in the US comparing parental perception of their child’s diet with quantitatively assessed diet quality. We examined the association between parent perception of their child’s overall diet and the child’s diet quality, as measured by frequency of consumption of key food categories. Methods: Secondary analysis was conducted using data from two independent cross- sectional panels of surveys with parents of a 3-18 year old child. Data collection took place in 2009-2010 and 2014, the random sample was drawn from low-income cities. Well-established survey questions …

Contributors
Eliason, Jessica, Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, DeWeese, Robin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Female college veterans face a host of struggles both personally and academically. Research that focuses primarily on female veterans’ wellness needs as they transition into civilian life is limited and this population is woefully understudied in comparison to male veterans. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore some of the wellness needs of female college veterans making the transition from military service to college/civilian life. Twelve hundred and thirty female veterans from a University Veterans Center were sent a recruitment email where 125 successfully completed a life satisfaction (Frisch, 1994), physical activity (Craig et al., 2003), resilience …

Contributors
Yu, Gladys Marie Tiu Lim, Swan, Pamela, Sebren, Ann, et al.
Created Date
2019

Exercise serves as a powerful stimulus to induce skeletal muscle adaptation. For instance, it is well understood that aerobic exercise (AE) elicits an adaptive response ultimately leading to increased fatigue resistance and capillarization, whereas resistance exercise (RE) is known to elicit an adaptive response leading to increased muscle strength and size. However, the precise molecular mechanisms mediating these unique adaptations to different forms of exercise remain to be completely resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the adaptive cellular response of skeletal muscle following acute AE and RE. Specifically, this study focused on two molecular processes: 1) mammalian/mechanistic …

Contributors
Mazo, Corey, Dickinson, Jared M, Carroll, Chad C, et al.
Created Date
2019

Many individual-level behavioral interventions improve health and well-being. However, most interventions exhibit considerable heterogeneity in response. Put differently, what might be effective on average might not be effective for specific individuals. From an individual’s perspective, many healthy behaviors exist that seem to have a positive impact. However, few existing tools support people in identifying interventions that work for them, personally. One approach to support such personalization is via self-experimentation using single-case designs. ‘Hack Your Health’ is a tool that guides individuals through an 18-day self-experiment to test if an intervention they choose (e.g., meditation, gratitude journaling) improves their own psychological …

Contributors
Phatak, Sayali Shekhar, Buman, Matthew P, Hekler, Eric B, et al.
Created Date
2019

Exposure to sun radiation (SUR) with ambient temperature may be an influencer on athletes’ sweat loss in different environments, but the results are not currently known. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of SUR on fluid balance (FB) and hydration status (HS) in athletes exercising indoors and outdoors. Initial FB and HS were assessed in NCAA-DI female soccer athletes (n=10) of a single team in temperate, dry conditions (55-68°F, 18-48% humidity) who were monitored during 3 practices of equal estimated energy expenditure (EE): two outdoors in direct SUR (cold/moderate temperatures) and one indoors without SUR (moderate …

Contributors
Olzinski, Stephanie, Wardenaar, Floris, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2019