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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2020


This dissertation examined how anxiety levels and social competence change across the course of early elementary school, as well as how individual differences at the transition to kindergarten may influence these trajectories. Previous research has supported unidirectional relations among anxiety and social competence, but few studies explore how inter- and intra-individual changes in social competence and anxiety may be related across time. From a developmental perspective, studying these trajectories following the transition to kindergarten is important, as cognitive and emotion regulation capacities increase markedly across kindergarten, and the relative success with which children navigate this transition can have a bearing …

Contributors
Parker, Julia Humphrey, Pina, Armando A., Grimm, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2016

Given the major investment young people make in earning and maintaining a peer reputation, our goal in this study was to explore the association between dimensions of negative and positive peer reputation in middle school and adjustment several years later, by the end of high school, among upper middle class youth. Prior research has shown negative reputations such as aggressive-disruptive and sensitive-isolated to be associated with maladjustment later in life, whereas reputations like popular and prosocial-leader have been related to positive future outcomes. However, there are contrary findings that reveal a more complex relationship between peer reputation and adjustment, showing …

Contributors
Curlee, Alexandria, Luthar, Suniya, Aiken, Leona, et al.
Created Date
2016

Perceived heaviness of lifted objects has been shown to scale to a ratio of muscle activity and movement during elbow lifts. This scaling reflects the importance of the forces applied to an object and the resulting kinematics for this perception. The current study determined whether these perceived heaviness dynamics are similar in other lifting conditions. Anatomically sourced context-conditioned variability has implications for motor control. The current study investigated whether these implications also hold for heaviness perception. In two experiments participants lifted objects with knee extension lifts and with several arm lifts and reported perceived heaviness. The resulting psychophysiological functions revealed …

Contributors
Waddell, Morgan Leigh, Amazeen, Eric L, Amazeen, Polemnia G, et al.
Created Date
2016

Proponents of cues-filtered-out approaches to communication suggest that the quality of person-to-person interaction is diminished when that interaction is mediated by technology. This postulation has implications for communication given the surging popularity of text messaging in the United States. It is important to examine the degree to which text messaging may inhibit successful communication due to the detriments of technologically mediated communication. The relation between text messaging and romantic relationship satisfaction in individuals ages 18-45 was investigated because successful communication is widely known by researchers and lay individuals to be an integral aspect of healthy intimate relationships. The Relationship Assessment …

Contributors
Okonowsky, Lindsay, Tracey, Terence, Robinson-Kurpius, Sharon, et al.
Created Date
2016

As methods for measuring the relationship between personality and behavior have become more sophisticated, so too has the interest in better explaining the role that environments play in this relationship. Recent efforts have been made to clarify the hypothesized moderating role of environments on this relationship and Cooper and Withey (2009), in particular, have provided evidence for the paucity of empirical research that explains the ways in which strong and weak situations may differentially affect the relationship between personality and behavior. They contend, through a thorough review of the literature, that the intuitive nature of the theory provides promise and …

Contributors
Primé, Dominic, Tracey, Terence JG, Bernstein, Bianca L, et al.
Created Date
2016

This dissertation research investigates the social implications of computing artifacts that make use of sensor driven self-quantification to implicitly or explicitly direct user behaviors. These technologies are referred to here as self-sensoring prescriptive applications (SSPA’s). This genre of technological application has a strong presence in healthcare as a means to monitor health, modify behavior, improve health outcomes, and reduce medical costs. However, the commercial sector is quickly adopting SSPA’s as a means to monitor and/or modify consumer behaviors as well (Swan, 2013). These wearable devices typically monitor factors such as movement, heartrate, and respiration; ostensibly to guide the users to …

Contributors
Baker, D. A., Schweitzer, Nicholas J, Wise, J. MacGregor, et al.
Created Date
2016

Given the continued increase in obesity rates in the United States, there has been growing research regarding factors related to obesity. Researchers have examined biological factors, such as set point theory, as well as various psychological factors such as motivation, self-efficacy, and eating styles. Taster-type, defined as how an individual experiences the perception of taste (particularly bitterness), is a recent area of research that has explored the potential relationship between this phenomenon and obesity. The current study examined whether taster-type impacted weight loss, along with secondary measures of BMI, waist circumference, and food neophobia, as well as taster-type’s impact on …

Contributors
Wagner, Melissa C., Robinson-Kurpius, Sharon, Capaldi Phillips, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2016

The comparison of between- versus within-person relations addresses a central issue in psychological research regarding whether group-level relations among variables generalize to individual group members. Between- and within-person effects may differ in magnitude as well as direction, and contextual multilevel models can accommodate this difference. Contextual multilevel models have been explicated mostly for cross-sectional data, but they can also be applied to longitudinal data where level-1 effects represent within-person relations and level-2 effects represent between-person relations. With longitudinal data, estimating the contextual effect allows direct evaluation of whether between-person and within-person effects differ. Furthermore, these models, unlike single-level models, permit …

Contributors
Wurpts, Ingrid Carlson, MacKinnon, David P, West, Stephen G, et al.
Created Date
2016

Sociopolitical involvement has been previously shown to be associated with experiences of discrimination. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) racial/ethnic minorities have faced multiple levels of discrimination from the mainstream community, racial/ethnic minority communities, and LGB communities. However, not many studies have investigated the association between intersectional forms of discrimination and sociopolitical involvement. The present study examines differences in perceptions of racism in the LGB community, sociopolitical involvement in racial/ethnic communities, and sociopolitical involvement in LGB communities among LGB racial/ethnic minorities (N = 203, MAge = 27.25). The sample included 107 (52.7%) men and 96 (47.3%) women; 41 (20.2%) lesbians, 89 …

Contributors
VanDaalen, Rachel, Santos, Carlos, Homer, Judith, et al.
Created Date
2016

There is conflicting evidence regarding whether a biasing effect of neuroscientific evidence exists. Early research warned of such bias, but more recent papers dispute such claims, with some suggesting a bias only occurs in situations of relative judgment, but not in situations of absolute judgment. The current studies examined the neuroimage bias within both criminal and civil court case contexts, specifically exploring if a bias is dependent on the context in which the neuroimage evidence is presented (i.e. a single expert vs. opposing experts). In the first experiment 408 participants read a criminal court case summary in which either one …

Contributors
Hafdahl, Riquel J., Schweitzer, Nicholas, Salerno, Jessica, et al.
Created Date
2016

Statistical mediation analysis allows researchers to identify the most important the mediating constructs in the causal process studied. Information about the mediating processes can be used to make interventions more powerful by enhancing successful program components and by not implementing components that did not significantly change the outcome. Identifying mediators is especially relevant when the hypothesized mediating construct consists of multiple related facets. The general definition of the construct and its facets might relate differently to external criteria. However, current methods do not allow researchers to study the relationships between general and specific aspects of a construct to an external …

Contributors
Gonzalez, Oscar, MacKinnon, David P, Grimm, Kevin J, et al.
Created Date
2016

Decades of research and empirical studies support the belief that traumatic life events lead to a multitude of negative outcomes (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996), however, new research suggests that some survivors of trauma experience significant psychological growth, known as posttraumatic growth (PTG) (Tedeschi, Park, & Calhoun, 1998). The current study focused on the trauma of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to the development of PTG. A TBI is both a psychological trauma and a type of acquired brain injury that occurs when physical injury causes damage to the brain (National Institutes of Health [NIH], 2013). Empirical studies …

Contributors
Gildar, Natalie Jane, Bernstein, Bianca L, Lavoie, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2016

Comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic pain create a heavier symptom burden than does chronic pain alone. Individuals with both conditions may exhibit physiological and emotional reactivity that make them susceptible to distressing reactions to negative social-emotional stimuli as well as less able to capitalize on positive social-emotional experiences. The current study examined physiological and emotional reactivity to affective stimuli in a laboratory setting as well as social responses to changes in interpersonal events in daily life among individuals with fibromyalgia (FM) and a history of PTSD symptoms versus those with FM only. The impact of the type of …

Contributors
Wolf, Laurie Dempsey, Davis, Mary C, Arizona State University
Created Date
2016

Although substantial research has examined individual, family, and peer factors that contribute to predicting adolescent alcohol use, limited attention has been devoted to the unique role of romantic partners and little consideration has been given to the potential importance of romantic relationship seriousness. Data from Waves I and II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were used to assess the relation between romantic relationship seriousness and binge drinking and drinking consequences one year later among 14-18 year-olds (n= 928 adolescents; 54.1% female). Main effects of relationship seriousness and moderating effects of adolescent age, partner age, adolescent …

Contributors
Carr, Colleen, Wolchik, Sharlene, Chassin, Laurie, et al.
Created Date
2016

Clinically meaningful emotional and behavioral problems are thought to be present beginning in infancy, and may be reliably assessed in children as young as 12 months old. However, few studies have investigated early correlates of emotional and behavioral problems assessed in infancy. The current study investigates the direct and interactive contributions of early infant and caregiver characteristics thought to play an important role in the ontogeny of behavior problems. Specifically, the study examines: (1) the links between temperamental reactivity across the first year of life and behavior problems at 18 months, (2) whether children high in temperamental reactivity are differentially …

Contributors
Lin, Betty, Crnic, Keith A, Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn S, et al.
Created Date
2016

There is a growing trend among community samples of young, adult women to initiate drug use for weight loss (Boys, Marsden, & Strang, 2001; Mendieta-Tan, Hulbert-Williams, & Nicholls, 2013). Research has suggested that consequential weight loss may maintain drug use (Cohen, et al., 2010; Ersche, Stochl, Woodward, & Fletcher, 2013; Sirles, 2002), which is compounded by women's perception that drugs are convenient and guarantee weight loss (Mendieta-Tan, et al., 2013). Stimulants, including cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and ecstasy, are notable drugs of use among college students (Johnston, et al., 2014; Teter, McCabe, LaGrange, Cranford, & Boyd, 2006). With known appetitive and …

Contributors
Bruening, Amanda, Perez, Marisol, Grimm, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2016

Adolescent substance use carries a considerable public health burden, and early initiation into use is especially problematic. Research has shown that sensation seeking traits increase risk for substance use experimentation, but less is known about individual and contextual factors that can potentially protect against this risk. This study utilized a longitudinal sub sample of youth (N=567) from a larger study of familial alcoholism to examine sensation seeking in early adolescence (ages 10-15) and its relations to later substance use experimentation. Hypotheses tested whether individual executive control, parenting consistency, neighborhood disadvantage, and neighborhood ethnic concentration moderated sensation seeking’s effects on substance …

Contributors
Jensen, Michaeline Rae, Gonzales, Nancy A, Chassin, Laurie, et al.
Created Date
2016

The present study aimed to test the effect of role socialization processes on declines in drinking after marriage. Role socialization as it relates to marriage theorizes that after occupying a role, individuals are likely to change their behaviors to conform to role expectations of marriage, such as reductions in drinking (Yamaguchi & Kandel, 1985). Previous literature has examined declines in drinking behaviors after marriage and inferred that role socialization was the underlying process. This study is the first to directly test whether beliefs that alcohol is harmful to the marital role predicted declines in frequency of drunkenness after marriage. Ordered …

Contributors
Sternberg, Ariel, Chassin, Laurie, Grimm, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2016

The goal of this study was to examine the correlation between the brain's preconscious processing of relationship events and direct observation of couples' behavior during a videotaped discussion task. Although we know about the interaction dynamics within romantic relationships that portend conflict and dissatisfaction, very little is known about how individuals read interpersonal events within their relationship. Romantic partners participated in a dyadic EEG (electroencephalogram) lab session in which they played a gambling task. The gambling task consisted of three conditions: 1) individual gambling 2) watching their partners gamble and 3) gambling with advice from their partners. Following the gambling …

Contributors
Champion, Charlie, Dishion, Thomas, Ha, Thao, et al.
Created Date
2016

Objective: The present study sought to 1) examine the measurement of emotional complexity (EC) by examining the associations among different indicators of EC (i.e., covariation between positive affect and negative affect; overall, negative, and positive granularity; overall, negative, and positive differentiation) derived from the same data set and identifying a latent factor structure; and 2) evaluate the predictive ability of EC on psychological distress, emotional well-being, and physical functioning while accounting for stressful contexts. The utility of assessing emotion diversity (ED) as another aspect of EC was also explored. Methods: 191 middle-aged adults from a community-based study on resilience were …

Contributors
Arewasikporn, Anne, Zautra, Alex J, Davis, Mary C, et al.
Created Date
2016