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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


The overall goal of this research project was to assess the feasibility of investigating the effects of microgravity on mineralization systems in unit gravity environments. If possible to perform these studies in unit gravity earth environments, such as earth, such systems can offer markedly less costly and more concerted research efforts to study these vitally important systems. Expected outcomes from easily accessible test environments and more tractable studies include the development of more advanced and adaptive material systems, including biological systems, particularly as humans ponder human exploration in deep space. The specific focus of the research was the design and …

Contributors
Seyedmadani, Kimia, Pizziconi, Vincent, Towe, Bruce, et al.
Created Date
2013

Cancer is a serious health concern. Current treatments are limited due to certain subpopulations of cancer cells being resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. These subpopulations have been qualitatively identified but much work remains to quantify the abnormalities they exhibit such as irregular nuclear shape. This dissertation seeks to determine physical science methods which can identify and quantify the biological characteristics of cancer and non-cancer cells. For the first project, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and chromatin of cancer and non-cancer esophageal cells were quantified using spectrophotometry and atomic force microscopy. Then the cellular nucleus shape, chromocenters, nucleoli, and nuclear speckles were …

Contributors
ARIYASINGHE, NETHMI KANCHANA, Ros, Robert, Arizona State University
Created Date
2019

Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a technique that influences the motion of polarizable particles in an electric field gradient. DEP can be combined with other effects that influence the motion of a particle in a microchannel, such as electrophoresis and electroosmosis. Together, these three can be used to probe properties of an analyte, including charge, conductivity, and zeta potential. DEP shows promise as a high-resolution differentiation and separation method, with the ability to distinguish between subtly-different populations. This, combined with the fast (on the order of minutes) analysis times offered by the technique, lend it many of the features necessary to be …

Contributors
Hilton, Shannon, Hayes, Mark A, Borges, Chad, et al.
Created Date
2019

All organisms need to be able to sense and respond to their environment. Much of this process takes place via proteins embedded in the cell membrane, the border between a living thing and the external world. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are a superfamily of membrane proteins that play diverse roles in physiology. Among the 27 TRP channels found in humans and other animals, TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are the primary sensors of cold and hot temperatures, respectively. They underlie the molecular basis of somatic temperature sensation, but beyond this are also known to …

Contributors
Hilton, Jacob, Van Horn, Wade D, Levitus, Marcia, et al.
Created Date
2019

In this work, I present a Bayesian inference computational framework for the analysis of widefield microscopy data that addresses three challenges: (1) counting and localizing stationary fluorescent molecules; (2) inferring a spatially-dependent effective fluorescence profile that describes the spatially-varying rate at which fluorescent molecules emit subsequently-detected photons (due to different illumination intensities or different local environments); and (3) inferring the camera gain. My general theoretical framework utilizes the Bayesian nonparametric Gaussian and beta-Bernoulli processes with a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, which I further specify and implement for Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy data, benchmarking the method on …

Contributors
Wallgren, Ross Tod, Presse, Steve, Armbruster, Hans, et al.
Created Date
2019

Bio-molecules and proteins are building blocks of life as is known, and understanding their dynamics and functions are necessary to better understand life and improve its quality. While ergodicity and fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT) are fundamental and crucial concepts regarding study of dynamics of systems in equilibrium, biological function is not possible in equilibrium. In this work, dynamical and orientational structural crossovers in low-temperature glycerol are investigated. A sudden and notable increase in the orientational Kirk- wood factor and the dielectric constant is observed, which appears in the same range of temperatures that dynamic crossover of translational and rotational dynamics …

Contributors
Seyedi, seyed salman, Matyushov, Dmitry V, Beckstein, Oliver, et al.
Created Date
2018

In a typical living cell, millions to billions of proteins—nanomachines that fluctuate and cycle among many conformational states—convert available free energy into mechanochemical work. A fundamental goal of biophysics is to ascertain how 3D protein structures encode specific functions, such as catalyzing chemical reactions or transporting nutrients into a cell. Protein dynamics span femtosecond timescales (i.e., covalent bond oscillations) to large conformational transition timescales in, and beyond, the millisecond regime (e.g., glucose transport across a phospholipid bilayer). Actual transition events are fast but rare, occurring orders of magnitude faster than typical metastable equilibrium waiting times. Equilibrium molecular dynamics (EqMD) can …

Contributors
Seyler, Sean Lee, Beckstein, Oliver, Chamberlin, Ralph, et al.
Created Date
2017

The evolution of photosynthesis caused the oxygen-rich atmosphere in which we thrive today. Although the reaction centers involved in oxygenic photosynthesis probably evolved from a protein like the reaction centers in modern anoxygenic photosynthesis, modern anoxygenic reaction centers are poorly understood. One such anaerobic reaction center is found in Heliobacterium modesticaldum. Here, the photosynthetic properties of H. modesticaldum are investigated, especially as they pertain to its unique photochemical reaction center. The first part of this dissertation describes the optimization of the previously established protocol for the H. modesticaldum reaction center isolation. Subsequently, electron transfer is characterized by ultrafast spectroscopy; the …

Contributors
Gisriel, Christopher James, Redding, Kevin E, Jones, Anne K, et al.
Created Date
2017

Synthetic gene networks have evolved from simple proof-of-concept circuits to complex therapy-oriented networks over the past fifteen years. This advancement has greatly facilitated expansion of the emerging field of synthetic biology. Multistability is a mechanism that cells use to achieve a discrete number of mutually exclusive states in response to environmental inputs. However, complex contextual connections of gene regulatory networks in natural settings often impede the experimental establishment of the function and dynamics of each specific gene network. In this work, diverse synthetic gene networks are rationally designed and constructed using well-characterized biological components to approach the cell fate determination …

Contributors
Wu, Fuqing, Wang, Xiao, Haynes, Karmella, et al.
Created Date
2017

Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biophysical studies due to its high sensitivity and broad availability. It is possible to detect fluorescence from single molecules allowing researchers to see the behavior of subpopulations whose presence is obscured by “bulk” collection methods. The fluorescent probes used in these experiments are affected by the solution and macromolecular environments they are in. A misunderstanding of a probe’s photophysics can lead researchers to assign observed behavior to biomolecules, when in fact the probe is responsible. On the other hand, a probe’s photophysical behavior is a signature of the environment surrounding it; it can …

Contributors
Ciuba, Monika A, Levitus, Marcia, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2017